Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Technical, Bike forums > Other Bikes Tech
Other Bikes Tech For Technical Questions on bikes not listed in the other forums.
Photo by Igor Djokovic, camping above San Juan river, Arizona USA

I haven't been everywhere...
but it's on my list!


Photo by Igor Djokovic,
camping above San Juan river,
Arizona USA



Like Tree94Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #91  
Old 2 Apr 2015
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Calgary AB
Posts: 1,028
Just to add to that. the DRZ E and S are 90% the same bike. The WRF and WRR are 0% the same bike. Pretty much the only thing they share is the first 2 letters. Both are road legal in Australia as well. The WRF is an enduro bike with maintenance intervals in the hours and not at all a travel rig. Both DR's are good travel rigs if you do your homework. I'd take the DR-E over the S personally and put up with the ali subframe, but prefer the WRR over all of these mentioned.

Europe doesn't see many of these bikes because there are simply no riding areas for them. There is a massive difference on what Adv riding means between the different continents. Which shows a lot on this forum.

Quote:
Originally Posted by duibhceK View Post
In most of Europe the WR250F and DRZ400E are road-legal bikes, and a lot cheaper and lighter than their -R and -S counterparts. Which is probably why not a lot of WR250R-s or DRZ400S-es were sold where I live.

DRZ400 hasn't been sold new in most of Europe for at least 6 years. Same for the DR650: hasn't been sold new ever since the EURO3-regulations were introduced in January 2006.

I agree that the WR-R is a good platform for making an adventure bike. And if you throw some extra money at it you could probably get it on par with the CCM in terms of range, comfort and weather protection. Probably still coming in at under the price of the CCM. You'd also still be about 25% down on HP and 45% on torque. But if you can live with that it is an excellent option. I know a guy that happily rode his 250R all around Europe on a 3 month trip.
__________________
Tacos Tyring Travels.com
Reply With Quote
  #92  
Old 2 Apr 2015
mollydog's Avatar
R.I.P.
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: california
Posts: 3,822
Quote:
Originally Posted by tmotten View Post
Just to add to that. the DRZ E and S are 90% the same bike.
This is the misperception most have regards these bikes. In fact they are quite different ... and in major important areas.
I was lucky enough to attend the original DRZ400S press introduction in around 2001 or 2002. The DRZ400Z and DRZ400E had already been out since 1999. Lots different according to Suzuki, who did an hour long tech intro to the new bike, citing all the specific changes made to the new, road legal "S" model. Note: USA model, perhaps EU/OZ bikes are different?

I don't have the Press packet they passed out but off the top of my head:

1. different cylinder head, piston, cam, valve sizes, cam timing, compression ratio.
2. substantially different charging and elec. system. (all DOT electrics)
3. Different Carb : standard CV carb on S vs. Pumper FCR carb on E.
4. Sub frame .. none on E.
5. Pillion additions, and lots of EPA/DOT smog additions to "S" model.
6. suspension. totally different.
7. Internal gearing.

Those are the basic differences, but there are more.

But I DO agree that either one would make a good travel bike and I too prefer E model (owned one) over the S model. But in the end ... if really doing it, I'd take the S model for practical considerations even though the E is MUCH better off road ... and much closer to a CCM if one were comparing them straight up.
Reply With Quote
  #93  
Old 2 Apr 2015
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Calgary AB
Posts: 1,028
Fair call. I was aware of most of those, but tried to point it out relative to the Yammy comparison who share next to no parts. Thanks for clarifying though.
__________________
Tacos Tyring Travels.com
Reply With Quote
  #94  
Old 2 Jun 2015
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 4,343
Getting back on the topic of the thread, sales of the GP450 continue, in the UK at least:-
http://www.adventurebikerider.com/fo...at-bolton.html

The earlier thread from ABR (it's a Brit website so naturally they talk about this bike) -- linked earlier in here -- also contains updates about the bike from those who have now put in a few 1000 miles since purchasing these bikes a few months ago.

Apparently, a niche manufacturer can still "make a go of it" in the UK.
__________________
Dave
Reply With Quote
  #95  
Old 4 Jun 2015
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 65
One shouldn't forget, that CCM is probably sourcing most of it's income from adapting vehicles for military and police use. Only the income from the 450 sales would probably never refinance the development costs.

My own CCM 450 will be back in the garage tomorrow, after some modifications and improvements have been done by the Swedish dealer NCCR. I am now really looking forward to take the bike on the mountain trails in Norway during my upcoming three week vacation, which starts in just a bit more than a week.
Reply With Quote
  #96  
Old 4 Jun 2015
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Oslo, Norway
Posts: 521
I think it will be perfect for Norway
Reply With Quote
  #97  
Old 27 Aug 2015
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 277
I was able to test the CCM in Italy, I really liked the bike, here is a little video I made about it for my blog (facebook.com/zimiontheloose)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UPijA8CJnIs
Reply With Quote
  #98  
Old 27 Aug 2015
mollydog's Avatar
R.I.P.
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: california
Posts: 3,822
Very nicely done video and a GREAT review as well!
Thanks for sharing!

What about riding this CCM fully loaded with luggage and all accessories on board? Have you tried the bike off road with full luggage?

I'm sure it's a great trail bike with no load on board but some will be taking the bike on long, extended RTW type rides and probably carrying TOO MUCH stuff.

And what about fast highway cruising (like at 70 mph all day) Can it do it OK?
(vibration? engine revving too high??)

What are your thoughts about the CCM as a long distance travel bike?

Reply With Quote
  #99  
Old 27 Aug 2015
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 277
Hi,

thanks!!! No I didn't have the change to ride the bike on highway neither with luggages...

I just had the opportunity to try it for 1 day, only off road.

waiting for somebody else to share some experience...
Reply With Quote
  #100  
Old 10 Oct 2015
Lowrider1263's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Sunderland
Posts: 254
I've had only one ccm that was the 404ds that I really enjoyed and the thought of ccm fetching out the ccm 450 made me think about my next purchase, with it been English that was even better till I seen the price, I still made contact twice to have a test ride as I thought if it's bril I pay the price, unfortunately they didn't even bother to get back to me on both occasions, not very good start, I was in Italy doing the hard alp tour last year when I tried to speak to ccm sales guy regarding the bike and very rudely he walked away when I was speaking to him,
I would not buy one of these bikes now if they were halve price, I'm sorry I can't tell you what they handle like but can tell you what the people are like that sell them,,,,,,shit,,,,,,
That's my experience people, other people have had better,,,,,I hope because in this industry you can not afford to do this that often.
Reply With Quote
  #101  
Old 11 Oct 2015
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: BC, sometimes
Posts: 578
Why anyone would buy one of these when they could have a Honda CB500X with the Rally Raid 3 kit for less money is beyond me.
Reply With Quote
  #102  
Old 11 Oct 2015
Tim Cullis's Avatar
Super Moderator
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: London and Granada Altiplano
Posts: 3,079
With those mods the CB500x ends up somewhat like the BMW 700GS, similar suspension travel and similar 19/17" wheel diameter. Personally I'd rather have the GP450's 21" front wheel and longer travel suspension.

Also not keen on DIY jobs to massively change a bike's characteristics, it raises eyebrows with insurance companies and you never get the secondhand resale value of all the extras from a standard bike.
__________________
"For sheer delight there is nothing like altitude; it gives one the thrill of adventure
and enlarges the world in which you live,"
Irving Mather (1892-1966)
Reply With Quote
  #103  
Old 11 Oct 2015
mollydog's Avatar
R.I.P.
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: california
Posts: 3,822
These are great points ... and ones I was not aware of.

At first I thought you were crackers regards weight and suspension travel similarities between the 700GS and kitted CB500X. Lo and behold you are spot on ... they end up very close in most every category. (BMW being a bit top heavy if I remember my test riding) BMW has more power, still returns great economy.
CB500 may have the edge in long term reliability .. Dunno for sure.

The Rally kitted CB500X still has about a $2000 USD price advantage over the BMW 700GS ($10K USD) ... but I'm thinking the BMW is the better road bike, packs up better for travel, will have better re-sale and better warranty. Trade offs.

But I agree, neither are (IMHO) great for technical trail use unless you are long legged, strong and an expert rider. Here the CCM wins the day every time. But a well kitted/modded DRZ400S is nearly as good for half the price ... not to mention ...

Current KTM and Husqvarna dual sport bikes are also in the $10K USD area. (I think the CCM is about 12K USD?) Much as I'd appreciate them ALL in tough off road situations, I don't consider any of them as ideal travel bikes. But HORSES for COURSES ... what works for Walter Colebatch may not work for everyone.
I don't need a race bike for travel.

I like cheap, cheerful, indestructible and ... EXPENDABLE!
Reply With Quote
  #104  
Old 11 Oct 2015
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: BC, sometimes
Posts: 578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Cullis View Post
With those mods the CB500x ends up somewhat like the BMW 700GS, similar suspension travel and similar 19/17" wheel diameter. Personally I'd rather have the GP450's 21" front wheel and longer travel suspension.

Also not keen on DIY jobs to massively change a bike's characteristics, it raises eyebrows with insurance companies and you never get the secondhand resale value of all the extras from a standard bike.
Compared to the BMW F700GS, the Honda will have far better fuel economy, better reliability and is cheaper even with the conversion kit; insurance here (N America) is not an issue and resale is higher due to the conversion.

Total no-brainer in my book, but you pays your money and you makes your choice.
Reply With Quote
  #105  
Old 12 Oct 2015
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 4,343
Cash isn't always king

Quote:
Originally Posted by docsherlock View Post
Why anyone would buy one of these when they could have a Honda CB500X with the Rally Raid 3 kit for less money is beyond me.
Maybe they actually like the GP450; maybe after taking a test ride even?
__________________
Dave
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Finally, a single cylinder adventure bike colebatch Which Bike? 305 27 Aug 2015 16:04
Europe Adventure johnnington Travellers Seeking Travellers 15 1 May 2013 21:44
Moto Adventure Nights - London - Second event july1 Motorcycle Events around the world 0 21 Mar 2013 19:29
The Meaning of Adventure WarthogARJ HU Travellers Meetings - UK 3 17 Jul 2012 23:31
DR650 SE or KTM Adventure? Zimi Which Bike? 31 16 Feb 2012 19:07

 
 

Announcements

Thinking about traveling? Not sure about the whole thing? Watch the HU Achievable Dream Video Trailers and then get ALL the information you need to get inspired and learn how to travel anywhere in the world!

Have YOU ever wondered who has ridden around the world? We did too - and now here's the list of Circumnavigators!
Check it out now
, and add your information if we didn't find you.

Next HU Eventscalendar

HU Event and other updates on the HUBB Forum "Traveller's Advisories" thread.
ALL Dates subject to change.

2024:

Add yourself to the Updates List for each event!

Questions about an event? Ask here

HUBBUK: info

See all event details

 
World's most listened to Adventure Motorbike Show!
Check the RAW segments; Grant, your HU host is on every month!
Episodes below to listen to while you, err, pretend to do something or other...

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

"Ultimate global guide for red-blooded bikers planning overseas exploration. Covers choice & preparation of best bike, shipping overseas, baggage design, riding techniques, travel health, visas, documentation, safety and useful addresses." Recommended. (Grant)



Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance.

Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance™ combines into a single integrated program the best evacuation and rescue with the premier travel insurance coverages designed for adventurers.

Led by special operations veterans, Stanford Medicine affiliated physicians, paramedics and other travel experts, Ripcord is perfect for adventure seekers, climbers, skiers, sports enthusiasts, hunters, international travelers, humanitarian efforts, expeditions and more.

Ripcord travel protection is now available for ALL nationalities, and travel is covered on motorcycles of all sizes!


 

What others say about HU...

"This site is the BIBLE for international bike travelers." Greg, Australia

"Thank you! The web site, The travels, The insight, The inspiration, Everything, just thanks." Colin, UK

"My friend and I are planning a trip from Singapore to England... We found (the HU) site invaluable as an aid to planning and have based a lot of our purchases (bikes, riding gear, etc.) on what we have learned from this site." Phil, Australia

"I for one always had an adventurous spirit, but you and Susan lit the fire for my trip and I'll be forever grateful for what you two do to inspire others to just do it." Brent, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the (video) series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring!" Jennifer, Canada

"Your worldwide organisation and events are the Go To places to for all serious touring and aspiring touring bikers." Trevor, South Africa

"This is the answer to all my questions." Haydn, Australia

"Keep going the excellent work you are doing for Horizons Unlimited - I love it!" Thomas, Germany

Lots more comments here!



Five books by Graham Field!

Diaries of a compulsive traveller
by Graham Field
Book, eBook, Audiobook

"A compelling, honest, inspiring and entertaining writing style with a built-in feel-good factor" Get them NOW from the authors' website and Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, Amazon.co.uk.



Back Road Map Books and Backroad GPS Maps for all of Canada - a must have!

New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80G/S.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events all over the world with the help of volunteers; we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, or ask questions on the HUBB. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:39.