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Which Bike? Comments and Questions on what is the best bike for YOU, for YOUR trip. Note that we believe that ANY bike will do, so please remember that it's all down to PERSONAL OPINION. Technical Questions for all brands go in their own forum.
Photo by George Guille, It's going to be a long 300km... Bolivian Amazon

I haven't been everywhere...
but it's on my list!


Photo by George Guille
It's going to be a long 300km...
Bolivian Amazon



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  #31  
Old 30 Dec 2021
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Originally Posted by Flipflop View Post
Perhaps it is because I’m tall - a high peg puts me way up in the air and must transfer a lot of weight up there.
I had a WR250R for green laning, which was great due to it’s lightness but I honestly found my GS better on easy tracks due to the low CoG.
I'm also fairly tall, and I used to ride a WR250F. It's a great green lane bike, perhaps a bit more sports inclined that I needed, but narrow, light and well balanced. Of course none of the big adventure bikes are remotely comparable. On my 790 I've fitted lower pegs and handlebar risers, which for me makes a big difference in the standing riding position. It also gives the bike a bit more of an "armchair" feel on the road. The pegs on the Tenere are quite high and I'd want to look for similar mods if I bought one of them.
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  #32  
Old 30 Dec 2021
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Well we sell loads of T7 s and they dont come back for issues either......that pretty much goes for yamahas full stop , their cp2/ cp3 engines are pretty much bulletproof if our workshops are anything to go by . Unfortunately the same cant b said for a certain Austrian make ......
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  #33  
Old 30 Dec 2021
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I test rode one and decided to not buy it. Like others have mentioned the COG is very high, it made trivial things like U-turns feel difficult.

Other than that it's almost a perfect bike.
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  #34  
Old 30 Dec 2021
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Originally Posted by chris gale View Post
Unfortunately the same cant b said for a certain Austrian make ......
I could put up with the problems if only KTM didn't try to wriggle out of warranty claims. I can't see me buying another, partly because of this, but mostly because as an adventure biker I totally disassociate myself from the 'ready to race' mentality.
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  #35  
Old 30 Dec 2021
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Tim that's one of the issues , another is their electronics . The brand is known as keeps taking money or keeps traumatizing mechanics .
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  #36  
Old 31 Dec 2021
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Originally Posted by Tim Cullis View Post
I could put up with the problems if only KTM didn't try to wriggle out of warranty claims. I can't see me buying another, partly because of this, but mostly because as an adventure biker I totally disassociate myself from the 'ready to race' mentality.
I agree with much of this, and the way KTM treat warranty claims also makes me unlikely to buy another. The bikes do attract more than their fair share of gobshites, unfortunately, and seem to have supplanted a certain other marque in the "must-have" stakes for hardcore mudplugging (and cafe/forum posing). But the 7/890 is a seriously competent adventure tourer and I don't regret buying mine. Time and mileage will tell if it's the machine to do the central Asian loop, god knows when that will be at current rates, but I'm still hopeful
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  #37  
Old 31 Dec 2021
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Toyark....have hopefully replied to ur PM re how far you can lower a T7 .
In case I havent and for others benefit....using the gen Yamaha lowering links and lower seat kit its 38mm in total. Dropping the forks is only really poss up to about 5mm max .
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  #38  
Old 31 Dec 2021
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t7

I would buy a t7 in a heartbeat if I had the money a proven Japanese engine yes
Parts yes on road capability yes off road the same yes No fuel tank wrapped around the engine yes where do these guys come up with these ideas Humm power and weight ratio perfect you dont need more than 70 horses to have a well balanced moto, derating the power curve is reliability. I have put all the power down on my f700gs in first gear in the sand and when it started to get traction it was a Whoa Nelly to control I almost flipped her over it scared the shit out of me
The t7 will be a moto that's going to be around for a long time with the weight well just get used to it The height is probably a turn off for many but I wish I would of bought a f800 to make it easier to go over obstacles but that is only when you are committed on your chosen line my F700gs will bounce over and its not a problem my skid plate takes the impact just fine
I think it is the best bike out there you can haul ass on the pavement and be nimble in the technical off road This is not a motocross bike or cross country enduro and you would probably wreck it if you treated it like one or the other
I live in a place that has unlimited back roads there are so many roads that are not on the map and its a paradise for back country I can spend 10 hours on a loop trip and never get higher than 3rd gear but it takes pavement to get to these locations then It is Off Road Colombia Pure enjoyment
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  #39  
Old 2 Jan 2022
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Long adventure on a T7 anyone?

All the YouTube clips of T7s being ridden on incredible terrain and doing magic jumps is impressive. However, has anyone any experience of riding a T7 on a long transcontinental adventure? Nick Sanders is one but that was sponsored. Experience from someone on this forum would be very reassuring. Cheers
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  #40  
Old 3 Jan 2022
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Cullis View Post
I could put up with the problems if only KTM didn't try to wriggle out of warranty claims. I can't see me buying another, partly because of this, but mostly because as an adventure biker I totally disassociate myself from the 'ready to race' mentality.
We are totally offtopic now - I just wanted to say I totally agree with you in that KTMs slogan thing. When Im doing a long or short trip Im definetively not thinking og pretending in or participating in a race or rally. I wake up late and start even later and travel slowly and Im not at all «Ready to race»
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  #41  
Old 3 Jan 2022
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Originally Posted by Flipflop View Post
The CoG is one of the most important factors for me, not for picking it up but for riding off road.
I tried the T7 on road and thought it excellent but yet to try off road - perhaps I will look at the Yamaha experience.
Perhaps it is because I’m tall - a high peg puts me way up in the air and must transfer a lot of weight up there.
I had a WR250R for green laning, which was great due to it’s lightness but I honestly found my GS better on easy tracks due to the low CoG.
I’ve tried big KTMs and F800gs on big bike trails and preferred my GS. I’m not sure that there is any trail I would ride on a T7 that I wouldn’t on my GS ie dry big bike trails.

IMO CoG is not discussed enough when I look at bike reviews so thanks for bringing it up.
I could not agree more. I like the T7 but I really feel the high CoG. Maybe it is a mental thing. I also did the T7 Yamaha Experience two days and loved it. I did not drop the bike once so I probably was not trying hard enough... I have ridden my GSA (TC) to Tibet, China, Thailand, etc, three months with some pretty awful trails and I felt very comfortable on the BMW. Plus I didn't even get a puncture. I did have help the few times I dropped the bike though so that peace if mind was there. I like the T7 but I am unsure about it for our next long adventure ride.
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  #42  
Old 3 Jan 2022
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Originally Posted by hugues View Post
I could not agree more. I like the T7 but I really feel the high CoG. Maybe it is a mental thing. I also did the T7 Yamaha Experience two days and loved it. I did not drop the bike once so I probably was not trying hard enough... I have ridden my GSA (TC) to Tibet, China, Thailand, etc, three months with some pretty awful trails and I felt very comfortable on the BMW. Plus I didn't even get a puncture. I did have help the few times I dropped the bike though so that peace if mind was there. I like the T7 but I am unsure about it for our next long adventure ride.
Pretty much where I am at the moment, hopefully doing a long trip later in the year.
Bosley’s Pegs are up to 50mm lower which would be great for lowering the CoG when I’m standing.
One consideration, for me, is that if I buy a T7 then I’d have to set it up for me - pegs, seat, suspension, luggage. My GS (TC) is ready to go.
If I still avoid those difficult routes then it’s good money after bad.
As always, I suspect, I’m overthinking it. I’ll book the T7 adventure day and take it from there.
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  #43  
Old 3 Jan 2022
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Originally Posted by hugues View Post
All the YouTube clips of T7s being ridden on incredible terrain and doing magic jumps is impressive. However, has anyone any experience of riding a T7 on a long transcontinental adventure? Nick Sanders is one but that was sponsored. Experience from someone on this forum would be very reassuring. Cheers
https://www.madornomad.com/yamaha-tenere-700-review/
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  #44  
Old 21 Jan 2022
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I have a T7 Rally with a few mods, and have had the time to put it through some paces.

I simply cannot explain how awesome this bike is. There is no other bike in this class that I would rather own, except for the far more expensive KTM 890, and even then I would be in doubt.

Instead of telling you why you should buy it, I'll list all the reasons I can think of for considering something else:

Why you would not buy a T7
  • Money truely is no object, so buying the KTM 890 is like nothing
  • You want a much, much, much lighter bike
  • Money is a huge concern, with even the thought of splurging out for the friendly priced T7 giving you nightmares
  • You plan to ride two up
  • You only plan to ride well paved roads
  • You have a particular fettish that this bike doesn't tickle
  • You are really truly vertically challenged
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  #45  
Old 21 Jan 2022
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheelie View Post
I have a T7 Rally with a few mods, and have had the time to put it through some paces.

I simply cannot explain how awesome this bike is. There is no other bike in this class that I would rather own, except for the far more expensive KTM 890, and even then I would be in doubt.

Instead of telling you why you should buy it, I'll list all the reasons I can think of for considering something else:

Why you would not buy a T7
  • Money truely is no object, so buying the KTM 890 is like nothing
  • You want a much, much, much lighter bike
  • Money is a huge concern, with even the thought of splurging out for the friendly priced T7 giving you nightmares
  • You plan to ride two up
  • You only plan to ride well paved roads
  • You have a particular fettish that this bike doesn't tickle
  • You are really truly vertically challenged
It sounds like you are still undecided about it. NOT (as they would say on Waynes World).
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