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Which Bike? Comments and Questions on what is the best bike for YOU, for YOUR trip. Note that we believe that ANY bike will do, so please remember that it's all down to PERSONAL OPINION. Technical Questions for all brands go in their own forum.
Photo by George Guille, It's going to be a long 300km... Bolivian Amazon

I haven't been everywhere...
but it's on my list!


Photo by George Guille
It's going to be a long 300km...
Bolivian Amazon



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  #1  
Old 8 Nov 2022
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New Suzuki V-Strom 800

And so we also have a new V-Strom from Suzuki too!

But its a not a V-engine, its a 776 ccm paralell twin. And its made to be more suited for uneven ground with a 21’ front wheel and a 17’ rear. Claimed power is 83 HO and wet weight is said to be 230 kilos. Gas tank is 20 liters and claimed range almost + 450 kms.

https://www.bennetts.co.uk/bikesocia...de-2023-review

Do we like it?
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  #2  
Old 9 Nov 2022
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I like it. An honest effort to compete with the T7 (may not be quite as capable, but close enough for most people's skill level).

The change from a V to an L2 may get some fanboys mad, but I owned a Gladius (loved the engine) and then rented a V-Strom 650 for a week on holiday - the engine was perfectly capable but not remarkable in sound or performance. I don't think anyone will be realistically able to tell the difference with an L2 hidden deep in there.
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  #3  
Old 9 Nov 2022
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Seems like a great overlanding bike. I like that the tanks is big enough! Stock suspension also seems very good. Might be a great two up bike?
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  #4  
Old 9 Nov 2022
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Pity it's tubed tyres. One of the main reasons for buying the KTM 790 was the tubeless tyres.
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  #5  
Old 10 Nov 2022
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Originally Posted by Tim Cullis View Post
Pity it's tubed tyres.
On suzuki website, it's written :

Pneu avant (front tyre) : 90/90-21M/C 54H tubeless
Pneu arrière (rear tyre) : 150/70R17M/C 69H tubeless

https://moto.suzuki.fr/gamme/trails/v-strom-800de/
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  #6  
Old 10 Nov 2022
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As they say in the writeup, it's a segment that's popular and becoming crowded. That'll make it difficult for any new entrant to make a mark unless it brings something really unique, and I don't see anything particularly unique here. A bit heavy, with the sector-standard power output. 20L of fuel carried high above the tank, vast amounts of electronic bells and whistles, lots of fragile bodywork and a low-slung exhaust. If I was looking for a bike to ride long distances through the middle of nowhere I'd buy the T7, but I'm sure the Suzuki will exude adventure cred outside the local café alongside the row of GS's.
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  #7  
Old 11 Nov 2022
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Personally I would hang on for the new transalp tbh . Am going to assume it will be up a k over the hornet so circa 8k.......I think honda will sell those and the hornet by the bucket load world wide . I like the V strom.....but it has an image problem.........or so our customers say .
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  #8  
Old 12 Nov 2022
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I've seen one in the flesh. And even sat on one. I was impressed.

Fully adjustable showa long travel suspension. (unlike the new Transalp which has no adjustment. Just basic preload adjustment forks. Booooo)

Removable rear subframe (so you won't write-off the bike if you drop it with luggage on and bend the subframe)

Very comfortable seat

Nice TFT screen. But not overwhelmed with gadgets and gimmicks like a BMW etc

The build quality looks fantastic.

You KNOW it will be fantastically reliable like all modern Suzuki bikes.

The real jewel is the 776cc cross plane motor. And more importantly, Suzuki have engineered a lovely balancer system into the motor. Which is what many of the other 270 degree parrallel twins get a bit of grief for.

I didn't check the wheels out. But they might be the same wheels as the 1050 V-strom which has tubeless Gold spoked wheels. Nice

Looking at it side to side with the new Transalp, I think it is a better Overlanders bike. The transalp looks better. But you can tell it's aimed at the Sunday School crowd with the spec.
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  #9  
Old 13 Nov 2022
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I was curious about the tubeless / tube type spec difference. Looked at a whole lot of photos, to see if I could see the tire valve and determine what type it is. I was impressed with Suzuki photographers attention to detail - in all but ONE photograph, both tire valves were hidden by body work - for a cleaner wheel look.

The ONE was a "parked out in the country shot" at a bit of a distance, and even blowing it up couldn't be sure - but I THINK it's a tubeless valve.


On the balancer question, saw a great photo of the system where it explains that the balancer is at 90 degrees to the crank - er no it's not. Looks pretty conventional to me, although it's possible that what they mean is that the balance weight for the right cylinder is in front of the left cylinder and vice versa. And that's just a guess, it's hard to tell without the engine turning over. Sounds good from the techno-bafflegab though!
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  #10  
Old 13 Nov 2022
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Originally Posted by Grant Johnson View Post
I was curious about the tubeless / tube type spec difference. Looked at a whole lot of photos, to see if I could see the tire valve and determine what type it is. I was impressed with Suzuki photographers attention to detail - in all but ONE photograph, both tire valves were hidden by body work - for a cleaner wheel look.

The ONE was a "parked out in the country shot" at a bit of a distance, and even blowing it up couldn't be sure - but I THINK it's a tubeless valve.


On the balancer question, saw a great photo of the system where it explains that the balancer is at 90 degrees to the crank - er no it's not. Looks pretty conventional to me, although it's possible that what they mean is that the balance weight for the right cylinder is in front of the left cylinder and vice versa. And that's just a guess, it's hard to tell without the engine turning over. Sounds good from the techno-bafflegab though!

Many of the big manufacturers are selling a similar size 750-800cc parrallel twin motor with a 270 crank to replicate a V-twin without the cost and chassis limitations to actually make one.

However, Suzuki are unique with their cross-balancer design. I suspect it maybe even patented. If you look at the released images, the balancers sit below the crank. There is A LOT of balancing going on in that motor. Far cleverer than anything else out there. It should be super creamy smooth but lovely and grunty too. Perfect Overland motor ?? We'll see...




The 1050 V-strom has gold tubleless wheels. Although is you compare wheels, they look quite different.

The 1050 rims have a spine for the spokes. I can't see that on the 800DE.

So I'm pretty certain they're Tube-type rims. Not a deal breaker for me. But I know the Transalp has Tubeless wheels. Although that is looking very much like a road bike in pretend Adv. clothing with it's basic suspension and single piece welded frame. From what I've read and heard from Suzuki press, they've designed the 800 to carry serious weight and being able to remove the subframe is a real bonus.









It's very much a "Suzuki thing" to let all the other manufactuers bring out new engines and ideas and then just see what does and doesn't work before bringing their own variant out a few years later after some serious thought.

They get stick for this. Being called "behind the times" etc. I think it's just good engineering.

I've been working at a Suzuki/Kawasaki workshop for the last few years. And prior to that I was with BMW for eight years.

I had more BMW's back for warranty problems, breakdowns and recalls in a month. Than I've had Suzukis back for problems in three years.

And that is no exageration. When it comes to flat out reliabilty. You simply can't beat the Japanese big four. And I would hazard that Suzuki are probably topping out on the others at the moment. Probably because they haven't really brought anything new out for a while. There have been more than a few problems with recent Hondas and Yamaha can be a little hit at miss. Kawasaki are bloody brilliant too.
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  #11  
Old 13 Nov 2022
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looks like a giant wasp !

I still think yamaha t7 is the one to beat , but we will see ?
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Old 13 Nov 2022
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looks like a giant wasp !

I still think yamaha t7 is the one to beat , but we will see ?
Other colours are available

The T7 is a nice bike. It is vibey though. And the seat is more 'offroad focussed'

I think the Strom will be more road orientated bike. And lets be honest. Even a gnarly RTW trip is 90% on tarmac. If not more.
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Old 13 Nov 2022
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Ted you made me laugh with the Sunday school crowd For fear of instant abuse I won't mention what manufacturer would supply those sort of bikes.......fully loaded from the catalogue etc.......despite owning one
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Old 13 Nov 2022
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Ted you made me laugh with the Sunday school crowd For fear of instant abuse I won't mention what manufacturer would supply those sort of bikes.......fully loaded from the catalogue etc.......despite owning one

I've owned more than my fair share. Of all ages and capacities. They're very good bikes. But they certainly have their anoyances. Which are often "fixable" for the enthusiant but a can ruin the trip of someone who can't tinker.
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  #15  
Old 22 Nov 2022
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I like it.
It seems very capable and well equipped bike in stock form. My experience with Suzuki quality has always been good. Power and weight specs are near identical to BMW F850GS.
But the market is crowded, and it's on the heavy side. My biggest complaint is that it's missing Cruise Control, which the F850 (and Aprilia Tuareg 660) has available.
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