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Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else This is an opportunity to ask any question, and post any notice you wish that doesn't fit into one of the other sections.
Photo by Igor Djokovic, camping above San Juan river, Arizona USA

I haven't been everywhere...
but it's on my list!


Photo by Igor Djokovic,
camping above San Juan river,
Arizona USA



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  #16  
Old 5 Jun 2014
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brendanhall View Post
I use HELD for gloves and have found them to be well made, a little warm but my preference is for sweaty hands not shredded ones!
Thanks. had a look but can't get them here except by mail order from touratech or motosport.com. Both deliver to SA. Most of their range is street/race oriented and or too heavy for out climate. The Namib and samba look suitable. Touratech doesn't offer the namib. They are expensive. Quite a bit more than BMW gloves, but I don't mind paying for quality. Since I have never seen one or tried it on, that is hard to judge. It is also difficult to buy online a product you have never tried before in terms of fit. Like so some long fingers and some short, even if you get size right.

Recently I've had GSII and GSIIIs, alpine stars, different types of Five gloves, Fox bombers. The GSII were the best but fingers a bit long.

Its really difficult to tell from catalogues. Touratech is the only one with an agent in SA so it is a local purchase. But their range of Held gloves here is only road gloves

http://shop.touratech.co.za/riding-g...nufacturer=700

I searched around the net and seems to be the quality of Held gloves has fallen since they moved production of the entry and mid range gloves to China. Apparently all of their kangaroo gloves and top of the range gloves are made in Germany and Hungary - like the Phantom gloves. The gloves made of more traditional material are made in China and Pakistan. Quite a few complaints about the recent gloves on ducati and such forums.

Last edited by Kradmelder; 5 Jun 2014 at 10:50.
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  #17  
Old 5 Jun 2014
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I mostly buy gloves in person, after trying them on. Fit is so important and nothing like using your OWN EYES to asses quality. This especially true on EXPENSIVE gloves. I hate sending things back.

Helimot, the long time San Jose, CA leather craftsman I spoke of earlier, used to be a dealer for Held. He was their biggest booster. But he howled when they pulled his dealership and now says Held gloves are crap.

IMHO, not true. I have too Kangaroo pairs of Held gloves ... one made in Germany, the other China. Both are great, well made, lasting well.
Actually, the Chinese ones fit me better ... the German ones the fingers are just a bit too long for me. (a common problem with gloves) But that's just ONE experience. At least now Held gloves are more affordable ... but of course we ALL pay the price for that ... either now or later.

So, for glove shopping, most online stores are out ... unless I know the product beforehand and have tried it on. Naturally, buying at a brick & mortar store you pay more than online.

But still, no where near the Tourtech or BMW price ... which are typically 30% to 40% above average for sometimes questionable quality.

What you guys need in S. Africa is a store like Chaparral motors. This place has several HUGE warehouses ... 4500 sq. ft. devoted just to helmets. They carry nearly every brand of Motorcycle (NOT BMW) and have HUGE stocks of everything on site. Most of their business is Mail Order on line. HUGE. The place is like two or three Costco Stores. Check out a few pics below.

When I head South to Mexico, I always like to stop in and shop around. Or, if on the road, you can always get ANY tire in half an hour ... installed. Prices are pretty good but since I live in California, I pay sales tax (9%) unlike at other out of state online business's like Rocky Mountain, Motorcycle Superstore, Bike Bandit or Motorcycle Gear. NON of those are even 1/2 the size of Chaparral. So if you want variety and CHOICE ... that is the place.

4,500 Square Foot Helmet Showroom with over 20 brands of motorcycle helmets | Yelp
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  #18  
Old 6 Jun 2014
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A couple comments:

Gloves

I can't say that I am overly impressed with Held gloves. I tried to do my research and they seemed to be the best around - stuff I could try and buy in - Toronto, Canada. I did read that many people felt that the quality has started to go down hill. I am presently on tour and have two pairs that are failing.

The Sambia gloves have ripped on on hand down the seam, as well as the rubber is de-laminating. I expected much more from this set and I haven't worn them that much as I save them for real heat.

The other pair is Held Sensato, my general use glove, and the clutching index finger has split at the seam.

My partner has Held Desert gloves and she has had to sew up a seam on the finger - again hot use only. Her simple Joe Rocket gloves are lasting much longer.

Gear

Having previously toured Mexico, Central and South America with Olympia X-Moto gear, basically textile gear with large mesh panels which can be covered with zip-over flaps, I found this gear too hot. I said to myself that if I ever do this sort of trip again, it would be using a mesh base layer and then use a layering system.

We bought the bullet and purchased two Motoport suits made with Kevlar mesh. (Search ADVrider for a lot of opinions, good and bad, about Motoport stuff). For the most part we have been quite happy with this gear. (Our personal exception is we don't believe that our build quality is up to snuff as we have had split seems and the manufacturer has somewhat admitted fault). The gear has served us well from slightly above freezing to +/- 40 degrees Celsius. I have also used the gear well below freezing in an urban environment.

We are using a layering system involving simple synthetic boxers and t-shirts for hot days (think think, athletic, quick dry - but not LD Comfort for multiple reasons), adding merino long bottoms and tops for less warm days, then a Warm N Safe heated jacket for cooler days, and Rev'it rain jacket and pants as necessary, not only for rain, but as a wind breaking shell, sometimes with the heated liner, sometimes without. You get the drift. The negative is that we some planning to do with regards to weather and spending some time dealing with layers. The positive is that we have a "one system for all climates" - so far.

We did also purchase the waterproof-breathable liners for these suits but have long since sent them home. They are heavy, bulky, hard to use, take to long to put on during sudden rain, etc. I think that we will continue to use them for back home for fall/winter/spring when we can basically leave them in. Had the timing been right, LD Comfort stuff would have been sent home (smelly, sweaty, hot, hard to dry).

If you really want to stay warm with this mesh gear, you need to put an layer over the mesh at which point the mesh starts to act as an insulator. At this point, the electrically heated jacket is really, really effective and we found ourselves booming down interstates somewhere between 0 and 10 degrees Celsius. I have tested the mesh jacket with the heated jacket below zero (Celsius), and at full temperature and while I was not I was not exactly comfortable, mainly due to hot and cold pockets. The mesh simply breathes too much and too much heat is lost.

What else to mention here? Motoport stuff is a little bulkier than some other gear meaning that it is a little harder to deal with when off the bike. Is it super-cool in super hot and/or humid conditions? I think it does a fine job at cooling at the temperatures we have taken it to. This excludes the Sudan and Death Valley. Standing still? Nope. That said, sitting at a road block in northern Colombian when the ambient temperature according to the bike thermometer, especially around the pants right above the engine is 50+ degrees, it is going to get hot - even in jeans or shorts(?). Humid Panama city? Not too bad. Hucking moderate off-road in Guatemala - starting to get hot. Not too much one can do here except the hard armour scenario.

Ah yes. My gear is all black. Her's is almost all black. Why? Mostly fashion but hides dirt. Hi-viz (we do sometimes use hi-viz vests) argument aside, my black Motoport gear is vastly cooler than my gray/tan Olympia stuff, and almost as cool as my old hi-viz mesh jacket (Motoport having much superior mesh in terms of crash protection).

Cheers.

Adam
(Writing from Potosí, Boliva)
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  #19  
Old 6 Jun 2014
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Excellent write up Adam!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Farkles View Post
I can't say that I am overly impressed with Held gloves. I tried to do my research and they seemed to be the best around - stuff I could try and buy in - Toronto, Canada. I did read that many people felt that the quality has started to go down hill. I am presently on tour and have two pairs that are failing.
Interesting! My Held gloves are probably older than yours ... one pair I have is China made (I think?). Sorry your's are crapping out!

Mine are Kangaroo, not textile. They've been good but never traveled LONG trips, they are sport touring gloves. I got both pair to test when working at the magazine. 1st pair ... around 2002, 2nd pair, 2009. Haven't followed HELD since ... so your info is more valid and up to date.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Farkles View Post
Gear
Having previously toured Mexico, Central and South America with Olympia X-Moto gear, basically textile gear with large mesh panels which can be covered with zip-over flaps, I found this gear too hot. I said to myself that if I ever do this sort of trip again, it would be using a mesh base layer and then use a layering system.
Good analysis. I've only tried on Olympia gear. Other staff did testing. It's decent to good gear but not suited for Cent. America heat. (as you know)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Farkles View Post
We bought the bullet and purchased two Motoport suits made with Kevlar mesh. (Search ADVrider for a lot of opinions, good and bad, about Motoport stuff).
Motoport stuff is clearly well made. Nothing like it in the market, except perhaps Aerostich. "Expensive but worth it", according to friends who bought it. But once again ... too thick & heavy duty, IMO, for severe heat/humidity. Vents well, but not enough.

I've followed Motoport since the 80's, met Wayne Boyer (Motoport CEO) when the "original" Motoport was part of German company DIFI. Wayne re-designed everything after the split and after a few generational upgrades, he finally came up with really good gear. BUT ... IMHO, not designed as super hot weather gear, but very versatile considering how THICK and HEAVY the Motoport gear is. GREAT crash protection. (BEST)

Seems from your excellent write up, you've had more problems with COLD than HEAT. As you've outlined ... layering and using a simple rain jacket/pants helps a lot with cold. But in super heat I keep heavy stuff packed away, using only FULL Mesh & quick-dry, high tech fabrics as base layers. Socks, underwear, T's, all quick dry too.

I lived in Guatemala & El Salvador years ago ...spent time in HOT season riding around, Thailand, Vietnam as well. Dry heat is easier than heat and humidity. Mojave and Baja are dry .. Cent. America is HUMID and HOT. Same for Asia.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Farkles View Post
Ah yes. My gear is all black. Her's is almost all black. Why? Mostly fashion but hides dirt. Hi-viz (we do sometimes use hi-viz vests) argument aside, my black Motoport gear is vastly cooler than my gray/tan Olympia stuff, and almost as cool as my old hi-viz mesh jacket (Motoport having much superior mesh in terms of crash protection).
Cheers.
Adam
(Writing from Potosí, Boliva)
No question the Motoport gear has excellent crash protection. It vents well for what it is. I'm not a fan of black ... even though my Joe Rocket Alter Ego Mesh is black (if was FREE). But it's so OPEN, it still works once moving even 10 mph.

I have 4 or 5 pair of Moto pants. Latest ones are the Klim Mojave. Well made but expensive. In cold, add base layer and rain pants over. Or switch to my leather pants ... which I carry along too. Take up space but covers ALL bases weather wise, hot/cold and in between.



Try one of the hundreds of Moto pants shown here ... most around
$100 usd, mas o menos. Don't forget to wear armor under!

Enjoy Potosi, possibly one of the most depressing towns I visited in S. America! You will LOVE Argentina!
Motocross Pants | Rocky Mountain ATV/MC
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  #20  
Old 16 Dec 2018
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bike trousers yes or no

Cooling Vests?

Sorry about hooking onto the trousers link but cool bits is important
Does anyone have any experience with Cooling Vests. Do they work? Would be a godsend in Australia at this time of year. Please see attached link for example. Any help appreciated.

https://www.adventuremoto.com.au/mac...-dry-evo~54756


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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  #21  
Old 17 Dec 2018
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That $245 will get you a LOT of wet T-shirts.
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  #22  
Old 18 Dec 2018
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Never ride without bike pants and jacket and have no problem with hot weather. Look at the locals, they never uncover body in heat, just the opposite.
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  #23  
Old 18 Dec 2018
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tremens View Post
Never ride without bike pants and jacket and have no problem with hot weather. Look at the locals, they never uncover body in heat, just the opposite.
I've ridden round town in shirtsleeves, even helmetless. But I would never ride without a reasonable degree of protection on a long journey, however hot it got. Just not worth it. Gravel rash in central Asia or Africa? No thanks...
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  #24  
Old 14 Jan 2024
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Holy thread resurrection, Batman
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  #25  
Old 14 Jan 2024
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Originally Posted by Flipflop View Post
Holy thread resurrection, Batman
More like ‘Holy thread resurrection, Spamman’
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  #26  
Old 14 Jan 2024
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I deleted the spam post and banned the new member posting it. It's helpful if obvious or suspected spam is reported at first glimpse using the little red and white exclamation point button on the upper right of every post.

Thanks!
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