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Photo by Ellen Delis, Lagunas Ojos del Campo, Antofalla, Catamarca

I haven't been everywhere...
but it's on my list!


Photo by Ellen Delis,
Lagunas Ojos del Campo,
Antofalla, Catamarca



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  #1  
Old 13 Jun 2013
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Buying a bike in Arg or Uru for travel to Colombia

My too-often delayed SA trip looks now to be a GO! The new route is B.A. to TdF and then up to Colombia, starting March 1 2014.

I'm looking for advice regarding the feasibility of buying a ~250 cc bike in B.A. (or Montevideo) for the trip. Any and all advice that will lead to the purchase of an economical bike that can be taken out of the country hassle-free will be appreciated!

Jim
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  #2  
Old 15 Jun 2013
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Hi Jim,

You can easily, and legally, buy a motorcycle in Argentina as a tourist, but, as far as I know, you cannot legally take it out of the country. Sorry for the bad news...
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  #3  
Old 15 Jun 2013
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More bad news. Bikes in Uruguay are very expensive.
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  #4  
Old 16 Jun 2013
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What about ...

... buying a U.S. titled bike from a traveler in Argentina or Uruguay?

Help! Need some hope here!
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  #5  
Old 16 Jun 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimAiken View Post
... buying a U.S. titled bike from a traveler in Argentina or Uruguay?

Help! Need some hope here!
... I would say that is the most cumbersome route you could choose...

First, how would you get your new title? The transfer of the title is done in the States, and I imagine there would have to be some back and forth documentation between you both (the seller and the buyer) and Motor Vehicle Division in the States.

Second, the Temporary Import Permit of the bike would be on the previous owner's name. I wonder if that would be a problem when you try to cross the Argentine border.

One uncomplicated thing to do is to buy an Argentine motorcycle and "just" tour Argentina. Argentina is such a huge and beautiful country! Then when you are done, sell the bike and fly back home. To buy an Argentine bike as a foreign tourist is an easy process. You can check my website, where I give detailed step by step instructions on how to do this.
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  #6  
Old 16 Jun 2013
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Thanks, everybody....

Having read that purchasing a bike in Chile is relatively easy, I'm thinking that the best thing to do is to explore options there, route down to TdF, up to Uruguay, and then across northern Argentina before heading up to Colombia.

Your advice, even though it's not what I wanted to hear, is appreciated!

Jim
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  #7  
Old 1 Jul 2013
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I would like to know as well...
Because from what I have been reading it seems like in almost every country its an expensive hassle and then you still can't get out of the country sometimes =(

Seems like the best way is to bring your own bike, or buy one under the table and make up fake EVERYTHING flying by the seat of your pants and lining the pockets of anyone who gives you hassle (just DONT CRASH cuz you wont have insurance)

*to buy a bike in chili is a 3week ordeal, to get all your paperwork, and after people are turned away at the peru border and such....ugh*
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  #8  
Old 1 Jul 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nickdcook View Post
I would like to know as well...
Because from what I have been reading it seems like in almost every country its an expensive hassle and then you still can't get out of the country sometimes =(

Seems like the best way is to bring your own bike, or buy one under the table and make up fake EVERYTHING flying by the seat of your pants and lining the pockets of anyone who gives you hassle (just DONT CRASH cuz you wont have insurance)

*to buy a bike in chili is a 3week ordeal, to get all your paperwork, and after people are turned away at the peru border and such....ugh*
Yes i agree, which is why i turned up with my own bike.

In hindsight plenty of people buy in Chile and ride out, so i would recommend doing this and it is what i would do myself if i did it again. I read those reports of being turned back at the Peru border, and don't doubt it is true, but it is not the norm at most borders. Chile has many borders so you will get out at one of them for sure. I Don't know the details, but at worst expect a problem or two up there into Peru, and expect to go out into Argentina or Bolivia without problem. I met many that have done so. At worst you need to try a few border crossing and pick the smaller remote ones to suceed. Just suggesting stuff.

Once you are out of Chile (after having a good look around because it is beautiful) then every other border crossing will be between two countries of which neither is Chilean... so you will be fine.

3 weeks to buy a bike might seem like a lot, but If you imported your bike you might expect a bit of down time anyway - some imports by boat and air go perfect and happen exactly as hoped... sometimes they get delayed a bit.

All the best
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  #9  
Old 6 Jul 2013
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We bought an English bike in Buenos Aires, got a registration on a friends´adress there and did a little trick at the border Uruguay-Argentina to get the bike into the country under our name. We´ve been travelling to Chile, Bolivia and Peru since then and haven´t experienced any problems. The bike is also legally insured. So buying a foreign bike in BA is definately possible, you´ll just have to find a solution for the registration! Good luck!
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  #10  
Old 7 Jul 2013
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A legal question or two

Suzpot, when you say "got a registration on a friend's address there" I assume you mean an address a friend's address in England... and thus the bike might be legally registered in your name in England. If this is correct, could you please enlighten us as to where you purchased the insurance???

In all but perhaps one State of the United States the new owner must not only present an address in the State of registration, but the bike itself for inspection. Does England not require an examination of the bike before legal transfer of title? Is there not inspection requirement?

Let me assure you, whatever insurance company that sold you insurance will in the event of an accident with personal injury and/or major property damage will be investigating all aspects of the bike's historical registrations, inspections , etc in an effort to avoid payouts for damages.

Look, this is not my first rodeo , I have been an advocate for more than one foreigner who really believed he was "legally insured," only to discover that not only was he not legally insured, but he did not legally own the bike. And, because more often than not the foreigner was in jail, could not just walk away from it all.

None of this has anything to do with the ability to cross borders with legal or illegal documents. Once an accident occurs the wheels of justice begin to grind slowly, but very, very finely, examining each and every aspect of the bike, the owner(s) and the rider.

Please, give a little more detail when advising others... thanks

xfiltrate

PS: an afterthought: if asked by the judge "where was the bike when you purchased it?" and you respond " It was in Argentina" the very first document that your insurance company will present will be the TVIP i(Temporary Vehicle Import Permit) issued to the former owner that clearly indicates the bike cannot be sold in Argentina. After that it will be all downhill for you..... why? Figure that out on your own....
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  #11  
Old 7 Jul 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xfiltrate View Post
In all but perhaps one State of the United States the new owner must not only present an address in the State of registration, but the bike itself for inspection.
I'm just here to point out that this particular part of xfiltrate's post is nonsense, and that it has always been nonsense in the past when he's posted the same misinformation.

What implications this might or might not have for transferring bikes in Argentina or elsewhere I'll leave alone this time. But it's worth knowing that the topic has been repeatedly done to death on the HUBB, and a search might therefore prove informative.

Good luck.

Mark
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  #12  
Old 7 Jul 2013
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Time to walk the talk

Mark , I know for a fact that 49 of the 50 United States require inspection of vehicles prior to registration of out of State vehicles. If you want to label my post "misinformation" please post the Motor Vehicle regulations for at least two States of the United States that do not require vehicle inspection. I have visited each of the motor vehicle department web sites for each of the fifty States. Have you, if so just post the States that do not require inspections or personal appearance of the buyer and we can put this to rest.

I notice you have avoided the subject of TVIP bikes transfers in Argentina, I suppose you also believe that that is possible legally?

I am not looking for a dispute with you , I admire most of your contributions to the HUBB, I am only providing legal information for those who might base important decisions on this thread.

xfiltrate

PS If you did not know, the new regulations have been in effect for years.....
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  #13  
Old 7 Jul 2013
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We've been through this before, and I don't like talking to cement walls.

You can check motorbike registration in Washington, Arizona and California; you'll find that in-state transfers of ownership require no inspections (except in a few smog-prone Arizona counties). It ain't rocket science. I've got better things to do than to run down the other 47 states, but I do know that many require inspections, while others do not. Many require proof of residency (utility bills in your name, leases, even in-state licenses) while others do not. Etc.

"I notice you have avoided the subject of TVIP bikes transfers in Argentina, I suppose you also believe that that is possible legally?"

Take your feeble straw man arguments elsewhere.

Mark
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  #14  
Old 7 Jul 2013
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State of Washington Title Transfer

Mark, here are the vehicle transfer regualations for the Dept of Motor Vehicles State of Washington..... please note bold print emission inspection required.....

I will next post Arizona and California title transfer reulations.
Let's keep it real here OK xfiltrate

Transferring ownership when buying from a private party
If you buy from a private party or receive a vehicle as a gift, you’re responsible for transferring ownership of the vehicle into your name within 15 days.

What you’ll need
When you buy a car, motorcycle, or other vehicle from a private party, make sure you receive all the documents required to transfer the title. These documents may include the following:
Vehicle Certificate of Ownership (title) — The seller must release ownership by signing in the appropriate place on the title. Everyone listed on the title must sign it.
Affidavit of Loss/Release of Interest — If the title is lost, the seller must complete an Affidavit of Loss/Release of Interest and sign it in the presence of a notary public, county auditor, or licensing agent. Everyone listed on the vehicle record must sign it.
Bill of sale — Both you and the seller must provide information about the sale on a Vehicle/Vessel Bill of Sale. This information includes the sale price, which is used to calculate the use tax you must pay.
Emissions testing report — Emissions testing is required in urban areas of Clark, King, Pierce, Snohomish, and Spokane counties.
Vehicle Title Application — If you mail your documents to us, you must include a notarized Vehicle Certificate of Ownership Application.
Odometer Disclosure Statement — If the vehicle is less than 10 years old, both you and seller must state the mileage and sign, either on the title itself or on an Odometer Disclosure Statement.

Note: Because the Odometer Disclosure Statement form is printed on tamperproof paper, it’s not available online and we can’t fax or email one to you.
If you need a copy of the form, there are 3 ways to get it:
Pick one up at any vehicle licensing office.
Send a request with your name and mailing address to titles@dol.wa.gov. We’ll mail it to you within 2 business days.
Call 360.902.3770. We’ll mail it to you within 2 business days.
If you’re a vehicle dealer and need multiple copies of the form, please call the Washington State Dealers Association at 800.998.9723.
How to transfer ownership into your name
At an office
Bring all the documents listed above that apply to you, and cash or a check for the fee. The licensing agent will help you through the process.
Visit any vehicle licensing office to get your new title in 8–10 weeks.
Visit a Quick Title office and request a Quick Title if you need your new title immediately. There’s an additional $50 fee to get a Quick Title.
Note: Quick titles aren’t available for snowmobiles, vehicles or boats reported as stolen, insurance or wrecker-destroyed vehicles and boats, or vehicles with ”WA rebuilt“ on the title.

By mail
Mail us your completed, notarized Vehicle Certificate of Ownership Application with the required supporting documents and a check or money order for the fee (payable to the Department of Licensing).
To get your new title mailed to you in 8–10 weeks, mail your application, supporting documents, and fees to:
Any vehicle licensing office
or
Refunds and Title Services
Department of Licensing
PO Box 9909
Olympia, WA 98507-8500
To get a your new title mailed to you immediately, request a Quick Title for an additional $50 fee and mail your application, supporting documents, and fees to:
A Quick Title office
or
Refunds and Title Services
Department of Licensing
PO Box 9909
Olympia, WA 98507-8500
Note: Quick titles aren’t available for snowmobiles, vehicles or boats reported as stolen, insurance or wrecker-destroyed vehicles and boats, or vehicles with ”WA rebuilt“ on the title.

Fees
Please contact a vehicle licensing office to find out exactly how much it will cost to transfer ownership of the vehicle into your name.

Deadlines and penalties
You must transfer ownership into your name within 15 calendar days from the date of purchase, or pay the following penalties:
$50 on the 16th day.
$2 per day for each day after the 16th day, up to a maximum of $125.
See also:

Replace a lost title
Get a title if the lienholder is out of business
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  #15  
Old 7 Jul 2013
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Xfiltrate you're a weird one. Yes there are four (4) counties in Washington which require emissions tests. There are thirty nine (39) counties in the state of Washington. What on god's green earth are you hoping to prove here?

I live in Washington. I know how it works. I buy motorbikes and cars here. Sheesh. Go somewhere else and wrestle with your imaginary demons.
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