Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Technical, Bike forums > Other Bikes Tech
Other Bikes Tech For Technical Questions on bikes not listed in the other forums.
Photo by Igor Djokovic, camping above San Juan river, Arizona USA

I haven't been everywhere...
but it's on my list!


Photo by Igor Djokovic,
camping above San Juan river,
Arizona USA



Like Tree7Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 29 Aug 2022
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Chapala, Jalisco, Mexico
Posts: 8
KLR650 vs Himilayan

In 2009 I rode from the Canada/USA border to the north shore of Alaska, then proceeded to ride every hwy in Alaska and then over the Top of the World Highway into Dawson City and then returned via the Alaskan Hwy. Going up I took the Stewart Cassiar. 14,000kms in total over a 22 day span of time. When I got back home again to southern BC, it was almost 3 months to the day that I finally gained all feeling back in my finger tips. Numbness and pins and needles feelings preceding that - all from the vibration of the KLR and of course the road surfaces over the northern 600kms or so of dirt. Shortly thereafter I bought a 650 Vstrom and never felt any numbness again.

So for those who actually have ridden both the KLR650 and the Himilayan - how does the Himilayan compare with the KLR650 in regards to vibration felt through the bars into the hands? Tnx

Ian
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 30 Aug 2022
*Touring Ted*'s Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Wirral, England.
Posts: 5,660
Being a smaller single cylinder, it may vibrate less. But not much. It's not known as being the smoothest bike out there.

Even if it did vibrate less, it will irritate you in other ways.

Dropping down from the reliabilty and robustness of a KLR to a cheap and unreliable Indian bike with terrbile brakes and suspension with barely enough power to get down the road may have you craving your KLR650 back. No matter how much it vibrates.

On your KLR, did you have rubber footpegs ? Thick grips ? There are lots of reasons a bike vibrates. And a few ways to address it.

However, the only way to find out if a bike is better for you than the one you have is to find a way to get a ride on one.

No point asking here. Everyone feels things differently and has different tollerances. Get a test ride.
__________________
Did some trips.
Rode some bikes.
Fix them for a living.
Can't say anymore.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 28 Sep 2022
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: midlands uk
Posts: 224
Vibrations on a motor bike are a killer if you have to ride most days !
You will feel you have travelled 500 miles per day ............ but only done 150 !
I have been to morocco a few times on a yamaha xtz and allways came back a bit shattered ! . but went back on a bmw gs 800 and felt fine !

Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 28 Sep 2022
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Belper, uk, EUROPE
Posts: 540
I listened to this podcast on Adventure Rider Radio - it is about vibration on bikes and ways to eliminate / reduce the effects so food for thought and pointers as to what can be done.
__________________
You will have to do without pocket handkerchiefs, and a great many other things, before we reach our journey's end, Bilbo Baggins. You were born to the rolling hills and little rivers of the Shire, but home is now behind you. The world is ahead.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 28 Sep 2022
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Oxford UK
Posts: 2,105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay_Benson View Post
I listened to this podcast on Adventure Rider Radio - it is about vibration on bikes and ways to eliminate / reduce the effects so food for thought and pointers as to what can be done.
Thanks for the pointer - I listened to most of that (skipped the adverts and a few other bits) but it didn't tell me much I hadn't worked out for myself (that bikes vibrate, and some bikes vibrate more than others and that for most of us vibration is so far down the 'wish list' as to come as a surprise when we ride something for the first time).

What I found depressing about it was that most of their 'fixes' - change the gearing, fill your handlebars with lead shot etc - have been around since the year dot, and were well known to British bike riders in the 50's / 60's. That we're still talking about doing the same now is a pretty depressing indictment of the bike industry (either that or those two old codgers they interviewed still live in the 50's / 60's ) Yes, a lot of bikes now have it engineered out one way or another but put enough miles on any bike and you'll feel the effects of vibration. Even my GoldWing 1800 will leave you with tingles after a long day. You can zone a lot of it out if you ride any bike regularly, but put a non rider on as a pillion and they'll notice it straight away.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 30 Nov 2022
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: midlands uk
Posts: 224
All single engine bikes will vibrate or zing a bit through the foot pegs ./ tank.
Great for a bit of charecter , but a nighmare after 2 / 3 days .
Worst 2 bikes that come to mind are...............
1 yamaha xt 600 e
2 Ktm 640 lc

There are proably a few more
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11 Dec 2022
Snakeboy's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Back into the hamster wheel again, in Oslo - Norway. Did a 5 year RTW trip/250 k kms, 2014-2019
Posts: 1,480
I have owned 3 big single cylindred bikes, a Honda Dominator NX650, Yamaha XT660Z and a Suzuki Dr650 and I also rode a rented Himalayan in the mountains of northern Thailand earlier this year and btw I have also ridden Royal Enfield Bullet 500s in Nepal, India and Bhutan - but I have never ridden a KLR.
All of these single cylindree bikes do vibrate a littlebit, and the RE Bullet most and the Tenere second most. But to be honest I have never been really bothered about it. After a 10-12 hour day on the Tenere my hands was a bit numb but 20-30 minutes after jumping off the bike my hands was ok again. So that KLR must have vibrated a lot…LOL
__________________
In the end everything will be fine. If its not fine its not the end....
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11 Dec 2022
Super Moderator
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Bellingham, WA, USA
Posts: 3,911
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snakeboy View Post
So that KLR must have vibrated a lot…LOL
Damage to nerve function doesn't work that way--it's more like hearing damage, in which when you go to a loud concert or use a loud tool your hearing may suffer for a bit, then recover. But in the longer term, if you do this repeatedly you're likely to suffer permanent damage which never gets better. Furthermore, people are different, and what happens to you doesn't necessarily correspond to what happens to the next person.

I am no expert, but I do have various kinds of permanent nerve damage (for which I've now had multiple major surgeries), and my advice would be to be sure never to do stuff which has longstanding neurological effects--numbness which lasts 3 months certainly qualifies--and to refrain from thinking that your experience so far in life can predict how it's going to work in the future--for you or for anyone else.

Just another perspective to consider. It's difficult to learn important life lessons from the experiences of other people, but by the time it happens to you personally it may be too late. How this might apply to vibrating handlebars and what steps may therefore be worth taking in response is an open--but worthwhile IMHO--question.

Mark
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11 Dec 2022
Snakeboy's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Back into the hamster wheel again, in Oslo - Norway. Did a 5 year RTW trip/250 k kms, 2014-2019
Posts: 1,480
Quote:
Originally Posted by markharf View Post
Damage to nerve function doesn't work that way--it's more like hearing damage, in which when you go to a loud concert or use a loud tool your hearing may suffer for a bit, then recover. But in the longer term, if you do this repeatedly you're likely to suffer permanent damage which never gets better. Furthermore, people are different, and what happens to you doesn't necessarily correspond to what happens to the next person.

I am no expert, but I do have various kinds of permanent nerve damage (for which I've now had multiple major surgeries), and my advice would be to be sure never to do stuff which has longstanding neurological effects--numbness which lasts 3 months certainly qualifies--and to refrain from thinking that your experience so far in life can predict how it's going to work in the future--for you or for anyone else.

Just another perspective to consider. It's difficult to learn important life lessons from the experiences of other people, but by the time it happens to you personally it may be too late. How this might apply to vibrating handlebars and what steps may therefore be worth taking in response is an open--but worthwhile IMHO--question.

Mark
By all means - I have never said anything about how nerve damage develops, I just mentioned that I have ridden several big single cylindred bikes several hundred thousand kms with having any nerve damage so I presumed your experiences and following health problems was because of your KLR had more vibrations than other similar bikes. It can be or not be because of the bike specific characteristics, or handlebars and weights added to handlebars, or other factors. I also said it in a jokingly way. I acknowledge your problems and hope your doing
well nowadays despite the health problems you mentioned.
__________________
In the end everything will be fine. If its not fine its not the end....
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 13 Dec 2022
*Touring Ted*'s Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Wirral, England.
Posts: 5,660
The bike I have ridden which vibrates and buzzes the most is BMW's highly refined and luxurious S1000XR.

And I think I've ridden and owned all the popular singles out there.

The S1000XR buzzes and vibrates at such a frequency that your fillings rattle loose and your corneas detach from your eyeballs.

So bad was the problem, BMW released a free campaign to add rubber dampers to the steering clamps. Which didn't do a lot.

So to say "Singles vibrate" is a little ambiguous.

Some singles do. Some don't. It depends on how the motor is tuned. If the motor has a large flywheel or balance weight etc. And simple things like if you have rubber footpegs and thick rubber grips.
__________________
Did some trips.
Rode some bikes.
Fix them for a living.
Can't say anymore.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 13 Dec 2022
Turbofurball's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: Catalunya
Posts: 278
Yeah, gotta make your own decisions there. Two anecdotes in that regard:

I had a 2010 XT660Z Ténéré that vibrated at over 60mph so badly I couldn't focus on the road because my eyeballs were shaking ... the dealership I bought it from said there was nothing wrong with it and I just didn't have experience riding big singles. I went back to my old and beaten XR400 after and it felt silky smooth by comparison.

While doing a road tour in France on my ER6f (2 cylinder 650) I got sick and the small vibration was enough that I was in excruciating pain trying to ride it. I swapped to my other half's CBR600F for the remainder and the amount of pain went down to a quarter of what it had been.

Long story short, vibration makes a big difference, people's experiences may vary, and bikes of the same model can vary greatly, it's worth resolving these issues if you're going to clock up the miles.
__________________
FreeBSD fan since before it was cool ...
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 14 Dec 2022
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 272
Good gel gloves make big difference. Also how bars set up, bar ends, vibration damping rubber mounts, etc.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 18 Dec 2022
*Touring Ted*'s Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Wirral, England.
Posts: 5,660
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclopathic View Post
Good gel gloves make big difference. Also how bars set up, bar ends, vibration damping rubber mounts, etc.
Gel gloves ? I haven't seen those.
__________________
Did some trips.
Rode some bikes.
Fix them for a living.
Can't say anymore.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 19 Dec 2022
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Colorado
Posts: 310
Yes , gloves with gel palms are very effective at isolating your hands from moto vibration. I've happily used gloves made by Olympia for years.

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=olympia+g...l_13ficvvwpk_e


.........shu
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 19 Dec 2022
Toyark's Avatar
-
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: WWW
Posts: 2,341
Cool Ahem...

Quote:
Originally Posted by *Touring Ted* View Post
I haven't seen those.
Strangely enough, just like all the s you've promised me over the last 15 years eh?.... but who's counting?
Merry Xmas anyways!
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help for RTW on KLR650 - spare parts? availability? Gotan Kawasaki Tech 13 16 Jul 2014 23:06

 
 

Announcements

Thinking about traveling? Not sure about the whole thing? Watch the HU Achievable Dream Video Trailers and then get ALL the information you need to get inspired and learn how to travel anywhere in the world!

Have YOU ever wondered who has ridden around the world? We did too - and now here's the list of Circumnavigators!
Check it out now
, and add your information if we didn't find you.

Next HU Eventscalendar

HU Event and other updates on the HUBB Forum "Traveller's Advisories" thread.
ALL Dates subject to change.

2024:

Add yourself to the Updates List for each event!

Questions about an event? Ask here

HUBBUK: info

See all event details

 
World's most listened to Adventure Motorbike Show!
Check the RAW segments; Grant, your HU host is on every month!
Episodes below to listen to while you, err, pretend to do something or other...

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

"Ultimate global guide for red-blooded bikers planning overseas exploration. Covers choice & preparation of best bike, shipping overseas, baggage design, riding techniques, travel health, visas, documentation, safety and useful addresses." Recommended. (Grant)



Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance.

Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance™ combines into a single integrated program the best evacuation and rescue with the premier travel insurance coverages designed for adventurers.

Led by special operations veterans, Stanford Medicine affiliated physicians, paramedics and other travel experts, Ripcord is perfect for adventure seekers, climbers, skiers, sports enthusiasts, hunters, international travelers, humanitarian efforts, expeditions and more.

Ripcord travel protection is now available for ALL nationalities, and travel is covered on motorcycles of all sizes!


 

What others say about HU...

"This site is the BIBLE for international bike travelers." Greg, Australia

"Thank you! The web site, The travels, The insight, The inspiration, Everything, just thanks." Colin, UK

"My friend and I are planning a trip from Singapore to England... We found (the HU) site invaluable as an aid to planning and have based a lot of our purchases (bikes, riding gear, etc.) on what we have learned from this site." Phil, Australia

"I for one always had an adventurous spirit, but you and Susan lit the fire for my trip and I'll be forever grateful for what you two do to inspire others to just do it." Brent, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the (video) series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring!" Jennifer, Canada

"Your worldwide organisation and events are the Go To places to for all serious touring and aspiring touring bikers." Trevor, South Africa

"This is the answer to all my questions." Haydn, Australia

"Keep going the excellent work you are doing for Horizons Unlimited - I love it!" Thomas, Germany

Lots more comments here!



Five books by Graham Field!

Diaries of a compulsive traveller
by Graham Field
Book, eBook, Audiobook

"A compelling, honest, inspiring and entertaining writing style with a built-in feel-good factor" Get them NOW from the authors' website and Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, Amazon.co.uk.



Back Road Map Books and Backroad GPS Maps for all of Canada - a must have!

New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80G/S.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events all over the world with the help of volunteers; we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, or ask questions on the HUBB. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:51.