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  #1  
Old 8 Feb 2014
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Help for RTW on KLR650 - spare parts? availability?

Hello to everybody!

My girlfriend and I (both Chilean) are going to make a Round The World trip on one klr650 2014, starting around march... Starting in Chile we are going to Europe, Russia, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, and South East Asia (and China on foot, too expensive to get the bike there). Then ship the bike to somewhere in Latin America, I'm not worried about this last part...and Iran (if I get the carne)

Do you know if the KLR650 2008+ is sold in those places?
well, I have been told that not in Russia

I already modified the passenger pegs so they are more comfortable

I'm equipping the bike: Corbin seat, safary tank, aluminium skid plate, head light protection, aluminium panniers.

I have seen an upgrade for the subframe bolts... has anyone had a problem with the factory ones?
Drill through subframe upgrade kit

Do you think a scottoiler is worth the money? should I buy one?
I was thinking on buying a stainless steel oil filter (reusable) and a magnetic drain plug... do you think those are safe to use with the bike.

And I'm wondering if you guys could give my some advise about which spare parts take with us,

I was thinking in:
- Chain
- throttle cable
- clutch cable

and maybe front brake pads, but just if I know for sure that I will not be able to get them after Europe

I've seen people doing big trips carrying lots of spare parts, even tires!! but that's way beyond my possibilities, as we are 2 up we need to use the space as wisely as we can (and do not overload de bike too)

BTW: I used to be chemical engineer (till September 2013) but I started a week ago to work for free as a motorcycle mechanic helper , I haven't seen any klr650 in the workshop,but most of the bikes are old Japanese with carburettor engines, so I believe that knowledge can become handy some day

Any help with this questions will be very much appreciated, and any other advise too!!

Cheers and thanks!

PD: after 4 months of planning (well, 4 months of hard planning, we have been daydreaming with it for 4 years)we are in the final stage of the planing, any advise will be highly appreciated.
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  #2  
Old 8 Feb 2014
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Hallo,

I've done Australia via Russia and Mongolia to UK and am about to do Europe and Africa. My thoughts are (in random order):
- KLR 2008+ model is not sold in most (all?) Europe because it does not meet current emission rules.
- despite that most of the basic (pads, filters, cables) spare parts are available fairly easily in UK (only place I've tried for them) as they are generally common to other models

- The only spare part I didn't have with me and I needed in 26,000 km was a fuel tap diaphragm and I got that by mail order to a friends address (and it wasn't a show stopper just an annoyance).

- No need to carry chain. You can buy 520 chains virtually anywhere in the world (and even if its a crap quality one it will keep you moving).

- The only bike specific parts I carry with me are two sizes down for each valve shims (so I can reset the valves - which seems to need to occur variably between 20-40,000k), front and rear brake pads, 2 x oil filter (change every second oil change so each is good for 10,000km), throttle pull cable, clutch cable (KLR's are hard on these), clutch and brake levers and replacement water pump mechanical and oil seal (easy to damage if you ever remove RHS engine cover).

- Stainless oil filter. My personal view is avoid them. When they are cleaned professionally in industry it is done ultrasonically to a high standard. Sloshing them around in a bit of cleaner does not do the same job. One or two spare paper filters are easy and light to carry - just wrap them in plastic.

- Two up on a KLR - get a new stiffer rear spring. The stock ones are marginal on a loaded bike one up. If you ride conservatively the stock shock itself is OK (mine lasted 160,000 km with one rebuild).

- Never had a problem with the sub-frame bolts. I have replaced mine with new bolts every few years. I see no need to go to the drill through option.

- I've never had a Scott oilers so can't comment on them. I get about 25,000km from a good quality o ring chain set with irregular oiling from a spray can.

- Buy metal (and wider) foot-pegs if you plan to ride off road at all. The rubber ones are lethally slippery when wet.

- Why the safari tank - the stock 22 -24 litres takes you more than far enough. If you put a bigger tank on you fill it up and suddenly there is even more weight on the bike.

- Personally I say the same for metal panniers they add another 5-10 kg compared with soft panniers. Two up you are trying to do everything sensible to save weight and this is an easy one. Also because they are wide they can make riding in cities harder. However I know a lot of people feel the perceived security is important to them, so that's your choice.

Bottom line is the KLR is a good tough (excepting the doo-hickey), if unexciting bike - makes it a really good choice!

Hope this helps. If you've got any detailed KLR questions send me a PM and I'll try and answer.
__________________
Martin

finally back on the road again


http://awayonmybike.blogspot.com/
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  #3  
Old 8 Feb 2014
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The only thing I would add, is that I have seen the upper sub frame bolts break. I drilled and tapped mine from the standard 8mm to 10mm, and used socket head (allen head) bolts. No problems, and I have travelled loaded down. Worth it to me, for peace of mind.
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  #4  
Old 8 Feb 2014
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Talking some klr advice

Hey Gotan,

I cant help with what KLR parts are available in Europe ... but

how many kms has your bike done anyway, im suggesting all this below on the basis that its a reasonably new 2014 bike

With my experiences with KLRs in the americas, I owned a 2003 and 2013, I had a very good experience mechanically with them and rightfully blow smoke up their bum, it just seemed to be the consumable parts that wore out as due to normal wear as most other bikes do, providing you maintain it reasonably well

if parts are going to be an issue in europe, KLR parts are readily available in the americas, so why not stock up before you go. i would definitely take, especially as there will be more wear and tear on the bike from 2 up, depending on how many kms you intend on doing, and im guessing a lot...

2 x front sprockets
1 x rear sprocket
spare accelerator cable - cable tied next to the existing one
spare clutch cable - cable tied next to the existing one
4 x cotter pins
2 x front brake pads
2 x rear brake pads
1 x master link for the chain
4 x brake pin bolts
2 x oil filters
spare front and rear tubes
spare tyre patch kit

other miscellaneous for fixing stuff - you can get anywhere, but not bad to get so you dont have to hunt for it in europe
roll of good cloth ductape
assorted cable ties
say 2 meters of thin metal wire , wrapped up around your luggage rack


I had no issues with any main frame bolt snapping, just a few came loose, and at times i carried probably equal weight to what you will. I just kept tightening them periodically or loktited them in

If you are carring a super lot of weight you may want to consider a harder spring rather than the stock

It would be great to know if you can get a matching chain in europe, say 15,000 kms into your trip, as i think its just too heavy to carry if you dont need too

Aluminum handguards, I noticed you hadn't installed, will save your brake and clutch levers in a crash , or else you should probably take those as spares. you can also then bolt-screw your stock windguards which come with the bike, over these aluminium hand guards to give your hands some more wind protection in the extreme cold

maybe also ....., I would also consider taking 4 valve shims , a little too large so they can be ground down and some spare front and rear brake pin bolts, as i found it hard to find other bike makes that would interchange , and these bolts are easily stripped and a super wierd size.

magnetic drain plug isnt a bad idea, but a a few metal shards arent a bad thing as ive been told by numerous kawi mechanics, so dont freak out if you see some in your oil changes

fibre oil filters seemed to work fine for me, no experience on the metal ones

tyres, I'm sure you can find on the road with some research and calculate where you may have to get them with others help, I'd suggest putting on some decent tyres before you leave ie hiedenau, so you can get a hell of a lot further than the cheaper brands

I'd also consider having a sufficient tool kit which would allow you to access most nuts and bolts on the bike, do a quick try around the bike-pull it apart and see what your tools will be able to access and tighten , i had to get wierd stuff like a super small spanner to tighten the radiator hoses which funnily loosened a lot, that i had had no other tool to tighten. At least 2 spare tyre irons and a quality bike pump to fix your tyres

theres a write up about maybe what to expect mechanically at http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hub...e-2012-a-66862

good idea working at the mechanics before you go, you'll thank yourself later

feel free to send me private messages as needed


cheers
Dom
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  #5  
Old 11 Feb 2014
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Hi Navalarchitect

thanks for your answer!
it has lot of useful info

Quote:
Originally Posted by navalarchitect View Post
Hallo,
- Stainless oil filter. My personal view is avoid them. When they are cleaned professionally in industry it is done ultrasonically to a high standard. Sloshing them around in a bit of cleaner does not do the same job. One or two spare paper filters are easy and light to carry - just wrap them in plastic.

- Two up on a KLR - get a new stiffer rear spring. The stock ones are marginal on a loaded bike one up. If you ride conservatively the stock shock itself is OK (mine lasted 160,000 km with one rebuild)....
Very smart point of view about the oil filter!!

I would like to get the stiffer rear spring, but i'm shiping the bike in two more weeks and it woudn't arrive to Chile before that (have to buy it overseas)

Quote:
Originally Posted by navalarchitect View Post
...
- Buy metal (and wider) foot-pegs if you plan to ride off road at all. The rubber ones are lethally slippery when wet.
...
interesting, I never had a problem with this, but I will look into it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by navalarchitect View Post
Hallo,
- Why the safari tank - the stock 22 -24 litres takes you more than far enough. If you put a bigger tank on you fill it up and suddenly there is even more weight on the bike.

- Personally I say the same for metal panniers they add another 5-10 kg compared with soft panniers. Two up you are trying to do everything sensible to save weight and this is an easy one. Also because they are wide they can make riding in cities harder. However I know a lot of people feel the perceived security is important to them, so that's your choice...
Safary tank? because I don't want to worry about fuel
it has a ton of autonomy and I can see the fuel in it (as the klr do not have fuel meter)

you are right about the metal panniers, but they give me some extra space to put stuff outside them.... anyway I have them since some years ago... probably when they brake down I will buy soft panniers.

cheers!
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  #6  
Old 11 Feb 2014
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AndyT View Post
The only thing I would add, is that I have seen the upper sub frame bolts break. I drilled and tapped mine from the standard 8mm to 10mm, and used socket head (allen head) bolts. No problems, and I have travelled loaded down. Worth it to me, for peace of mind.
Hi Andy!

thanks for your answer...

btw, I've been told in a klr650 forum that the 2008+ has stronger bolts (10 mm) than the previous versions (8 mm)

and the problem should be quite more common in the older klr
cheers!
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  #7  
Old 11 Feb 2014
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sellheim View Post
how many kms has your bike done anyway, im suggesting all this below on the basis that its a reasonably new 2014 bike
just 600 miles .... today I send it to the first maintainance
we bought it like 3 weeks ago for the RTW

Quote:
Originally Posted by sellheim View Post
spare accelerator cable - cable tied next to the existing one
spare clutch cable - cable tied next to the existing one
thanks for the list, is quite good (and I will have to translate some items )... and the cable tied to the existing line is a brilliant idea! I never thought on that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sellheim View Post
I had no issues with any main frame bolt snapping, just a few came loose, and at times i carried probably equal weight to what you will. I just kept tightening them periodically or loktited them in

If you are carring a super lot of weight you may want to consider a harder spring rather than the stock
thanks for the info, I will buy some loctite, and about the rear shock, I'm out of time to get a better one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sellheim View Post
Aluminum handguards, I noticed you hadn't installed, will save your brake and clutch levers in a crash , or else you should probably take those as spares. you can also then bolt-screw your stock windguards which come with the bike, over these aluminium hand guards to give your hands some more wind protection in the extreme cold
well, I thought I bought some from touratech usa, and when I got them I realized they are not aluminium, but just plastic... I'm not sure if use this "very tough plastic" or buy proper aluminium ones.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sellheim View Post
I'd also consider having a sufficient tool kit which would allow you to access most nuts and bolts on the bike, do a quick try around the bike-pull it apart and see what your tools will be able to access and tighten , i had to get wierd stuff like a super small spanner to tighten the radiator hoses which funnily loosened a lot, that i had had no other tool to tighten. At least 2 spare tyre irons and a quality bike pump to fix your tyres
oh yes, I'm working in the toolkt too.

thanks!
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  #8  
Old 3 Mar 2014
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Hi! Gotan,
Nice to hear you are coming this part of the world. I lived in Malaysia.
I have travelled Colombia down to Ushuaia and up again to Colombia in 2012 then last year cross West to East the USA, up into Canada and further up to Prudhoe Bay before ending in Nelson Canada. All on KLR 650. For the S. America trip I bought a Colombian registered 2005 KLR. The US and Canada a rented 1998 KLR. Both bikes performed superb. Only issues were the cable clutches broke and replaced, meter cables broke but I continued without replacement until I finish the trip and "vacuum" effect on the fuel line (probably due to petcock failure). At home I own a 2008 KLR.
Next year I will be travelling from the Netherland to Malaysia with my 2008 KLR with 110,000 km on the odometer. To give you an idea of my KLR preparation, I did the following:
a. Changed new sprockets and standard chain
b. Fixed Happy Trails engine guard and skid plate
c. Hepco Becker metal panniers
d. Replaced new shims for all valves and adjusted
e. New sets of standard tires (off road Dunlop)
f. Changed oil and fiters
g. Check and strengthen sub-frame nuts and bolts
h. Changed new front and rear disc plates
i. Changes new clutch cable
j. Checked all wiring and harness for chaff and bare wire insulation
k. Changed all fuses

I will bring the following spares
a. Rear tire and inner tube
b. A set of front, rear sprocket and chain
c. Clutch cable
d. Fuses
e. Bulbs

I hope to see you on the road next year and if you want to travel China together, please let me know. We can team up. In any case if you happen to meet another Malaysia bloke (Alex Wong) and his wife on a BMW GSA riding down towards Ushuaia end of this year you may want bto speak to him because I am to meet him next year in Europe to travel together to Malaysia. This would be a great opportunity for us to team up.
Hope some of the info helpful to you.

Amzah

PS - KLR spare parts in Thailand and Malaysia plentiful.
If you want a place to stay while in Malaysia, you are most welcome to stay in my rented house -free of charge.
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  #9  
Old 3 Mar 2014
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Hi amzahsulaiman:

thanks for the information!

Quote:
Originally Posted by amzahsulaiman View Post
Hi! Gotan,
I will bring the following spares
...
b. A set of front, rear sprocket and chain
...
d. Fuses...
good to know, I'm carrying A set of front, rear sprocket and chain, but I was feeling like it was too much, now I'm more comfortable with it.

Fuses! I forgot them!! thanks!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by amzahsulaiman View Post
Hi! Gotan,
I hope to see you on the road next year and if you want to travel China together, please let me know. We can team up. In any case if you happen to meet another Malaysia bloke (Alex Wong) and his wife on a BMW GSA riding down towards Ushuaia end of this year you may want bto speak to him because I am to meet him next year in Europe to travel together to Malaysia. This would be a great opportunity for us to team up.
Hope some of the info helpful to you.
It would be nice to team up to do China, but becuase of the bunch of money it cost I already lost the hope of going there with the bike, we are planing to go there on foot.

By the end of this year we will not be in south america to meet your friend.

Quote:
Originally Posted by amzahsulaiman View Post
Hi! Gotan,
...

PS - KLR spare parts in Thailand and Malaysia plentiful.
If you want a place to stay while in Malaysia, you are most welcome to stay in my rented house -free of charge.
We would love to go to Malaysia, if we get there I will let you know... thanks!!
and good to know I will get spare parts in tailand
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  #10  
Old 4 Mar 2014
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Are you working at the motorcycle shop now? ¡Espero que si!
How is it going? Can you change a rear tire "solo"? Can you measure valve clearances and change shims on your KLR yet?
Can you remove and replace a chain, sprockets, using a Rivet Link tool?
Can you remove the Carb, re-jet and clean it ... without ruining it?

You could learn a lot by studying the modifications done on a KLR now FOR SALE here on the HUBB. This KLR is somewhere in Peru' or Ecuador? (not sure)

But the list of mods & extras done are impressive.
Very professional set up. Find it here:
http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hub...lr-685-a-74937

Be careful about over loading. A too heavy bike is a NIGHTMARE on rough dirt roads, especially in MUD, IMO.

If your machine starts off in very good to excellent condition, then should not need too many extra parts. It will need expendables like: front sprockets, rear brake pads, tubes (carry 3) ... most of all ... rear tires.

Front tires last a long time (about 14K kms.) A good rear tire might go 10K kms. if you're lucky, 7K kms. if you're unlucky. The extra weight of a pillion means faster rear tire wear. I would most definitely carry a spare rear tire on the bike. (somehow??)

Hard luggage adds about 20kgs. over soft luggage. Try to order parts ahead ... call or email a dealer ahead on your route. With good planning and LUCK ... it should work out and parts will be there waiting when you arrive.

Doing China on foot is very smart, IMO. TOTAL waste of money to pay $$money$$ to import your bikes there. By the time you get to China you will be ready for a rest break from the KLR, no?

¡Que le via muy bien!
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  #11  
Old 8 Mar 2014
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...dont worry about parts in Europe. You can get anything in Germany!
Check ebay.de for KLR 650. Or the famous stores: louis.de and Polo Motorrad - Motorradbekleidung und Technik | Polo-Motorrad

Have fun on youre trip
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  #12  
Old 10 Mar 2014
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Hi mollydog:

thanks!!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by mollydog View Post
Are you working at the motorcycle shop now? ¡Espero que si!
How is it going? Can you change a rear tire "solo"? Can you measure valve clearances and change shims on your KLR yet?
Can you remove and replace a chain, sprockets, using a Rivet Link tool?
Can you remove the Carb, re-jet and clean it ... without ruining it?
almost none of them, I'm just the helper... but anyway I'm learning fast.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mollydog View Post
You could learn a lot by studying the modifications done on a KLR now FOR SALE here on the HUBB. This KLR is somewhere in Peru' or Ecuador? (not sure)

But the list of mods & extras done are impressive.
Very professional set up. Find it here:
http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hub...lr-685-a-74937
awesome!! thanks for the link!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mollydog View Post
Be careful about over loading. A too heavy bike is a NIGHTMARE on rough dirt roads, especially in MUD, IMO.

If your machine starts off in very good to excellent condition, then should not need too many extra parts. It will need expendables like: front sprockets, rear brake pads, tubes (carry 3) ... most of all ... rear tires.

Front tires last a long time (about 14K kms.) A good rear tire might go 10K kms. if you're lucky, 7K kms. if you're unlucky. The extra weight of a pillion means faster rear tire wear. I would most definitely carry a spare rear tire on the bike. (somehow??)
yes the bike is prety new.... I would like to carry a rear tire, but that's imposible, due to space constraints.
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  #13  
Old 10 Mar 2014
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoon View Post
...dont worry about parts in Europe. You can get anything in Germany!
Check ebay.de for KLR 650. Or the famous stores: louis.de and Polo Motorrad - Motorradbekleidung und Technik | Polo-Motorrad

Have fun on youre trip
oh!!

really...that's really good news... thanks!!!
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  #14  
Old 16 Jul 2014
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In case there's anyone following this tread, we finally started our RTW trip, here I posted this start:

http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hub...327#post473377

bast regards,
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