Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Technical, Bike forums > Bodger Fix
Bodger Fix What they don't show you in the repair manual - tales of duct tape, bailing wire and WD 40. Bodge, Bush Mechanics, farmers fix, patch, temporary repair, or whatever your definition, tell us YOUR best story of a bodge that got you home!
Photo by Anne Knoedler, Floating, Kolyma.

Adventure is what you make it

Anne Knoedler, Floating, Kolyma River, Russia.



Like Tree30Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #46  
Old 5 Apr 2015
ajaxer's Avatar
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 33
Smile Ducati electric bodge

Back in the early 80's I had a GTS 860 Duke. This was a time when they were notorious for awful electrics. True to form, I was on a trip round Scotland with my sister on the back, out on some remote country lane, when suddenly everything went ominously silent. Somehow I just 'knew' what it was (spending time poking around maintaining one's own bike pays off) and with the aid of some silver paper and duct tape, I had found and repaired the broken wire in the headlight nacelle and we were off again. She was mightily impressed (as was I secretly).
__________________
Ajaxer(Back in the fold)
BMW R1200RT
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 9 Jul 2015
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 231








Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 5 Aug 2015
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: West Yorkshire UK
Posts: 1,785
I recently found a lovely little sheep track above Aysgarth. This had less than lovely gravel on a corner and a bit of ham-fisted riding got me highsided at about 15 mph. Having picked myself up and got the bike upright I had two minutes to calm down then decided what to do. The brake lever was rideable, who needs more than 2 inches to get a couple of fingers on. The footpeg was less great, no fun getting off the hill and 50 miles home holding a leg up. The brain that had held onto the clutch as the back wheel locked and threw me off then decided to start working. The pillion pegs fasten by the same pin used on the riders pegs. Knock off the circlip, pull out the pin, fit the pillion peg in the riders position and bar sorting the mirrors out it’s off home for a bath to get the “farming by-product” off, pain killers and something to settle the nerves.



The next problem is work. It’s going to take 2 working days to get Guzzi parts (you’ve got to love Fowlers in Bristol when it all goes to plan) and plod, who hangs about pointing his laser at commuters, can get arsey about missing bits especially safety stuff . The peg is easy, epoxy, clamp up for an hour, refit, good as new. The brake lever is not going to glue. So, find a drill and the baleing wire and do some stitches of the type last seen on Frankenstein’s monster to hold the glue. Bandage with electrical tape and we have a lever that’s good to go.





Lessons learned for a longer rip would be:
1. Get brain sorted regarding clutch.
2. Replace the pin and circlip arrangement on the pegs with bolts and nylocs if at all appropriate. Getting circlips off is easy, back on not so.
3. Baleing wire, epoxy and tape are the bodgers friend.
4. Carrying a small drill bit or two may not be the overkill it seems. Borrowing a hand drill would make this repair easy. Given enough time waiting at the side of the road you might even bore the holes by hand, the brake lever material is soft alloy.

Andy
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 23 May 2023
Banned
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Aug 2022
Posts: 31
So, I'm accelerating on a ramp onto a motorway and the chain cuts, I manage to find a nice paved spot to stop and walk back to find my chain, happy that I was carrying a spare link, as Im walking back to the bike I find a piece of carpet, great to kneel on and spread out my tools, and then I find a large towel, even better, now I can wipe the grease off my hands when I finish the job.
All went well, and I was soo pleased with myself till I wiped my hands on the towel, it had been rolled up and was full of vomit

sorry no usefull info here
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 17 Jul 2023
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Neiva Colombia
Posts: 210
clutch lever

busted it this week in the mountains. 50 km from home base vise grips save the day and every day if there is one tool you should carry this would be it and zip ties/tie wraps I removed the cable from the handle bar end and attached it to basicly the handle bare mount and pulled the clutch cable aft with the vise grip
although it was quite nerve racking driving in city traffic at 5 o'clock rush hour in Valledupar Colombia with this set up.i never stalled once and wish man was made with 3 hands, one especially to finger the bastards behind me honking there horns a handy capped motorcycle in Colombian cities is not fun
Reply With Quote
  #51  
Old 17 Jul 2023
Turbofurball's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: Catalunya
Posts: 257
For future reference, there's a big difference between fingering someone and giving them the finger. You might want to be careful with that one.
__________________
FreeBSD fan since before it was cool ...
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 18 Jul 2023
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Neiva Colombia
Posts: 210
ok you may be shot in Texas or any good ole redneck state in USA

Why do the latinos use there horn. any driver from any civilized country knows why they have a horn and use it accordingly not because of aggression
on one job we were on in colombia we used a taxi from the hotel to the airport and back after the flights we used the same operator every day I would count how many times he honked in 1.5 km it was usually 15 so that's 30 times in 3 km. So the trip was 10000 pesos , I said to the Taxi driver lets make a deal he said what kind of deal, I said I would give you 15 thousand pesos if you can drive to the airport with out using your horn,But every time you use your horn I will deduct 1000 pesos he agreed and off we went , we arrived and he owed me 1000 pesos he used his horn 16 times
my Colombian - Brazilian co workers were killing themselves laughing as I was trying to get a thousand pesos from this taxi driver.
I ended up paying the regular fare 10000. the return to hotel trip he never honked his horn he knew it was not necessary A horn doesn't improve traffic flow
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 18 Jul 2023
Turbofurball's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: Catalunya
Posts: 257
We've gone from fingering to excessive horn ... the reputation for passionate Latin@s is well deserved, it seems
__________________
FreeBSD fan since before it was cool ...
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 29 Jul 2023
Chris Scott's Avatar
Super Moderator
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 4,779
mysterious clutch repair

Just read this baffling bodge in a report on Gunbarrel Highway.

... we devised a strategy for self-rescue.
We laid the [DR650 rental] on its side and removed the clutch without letting any sand into the engine. We then took a metal plate, cut it in half, folded it over and replaced it, then topped up the oil. Bingo! We had an operational Suzuki again. The question was how long for?


What do you think it means?
They bent one of the metal clutch plates in half and stuck it back in?
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 31 Jul 2023
Turbofurball's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: Catalunya
Posts: 257
Did they say what the problem was in the first place?
__________________
FreeBSD fan since before it was cool ...
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 31 Jul 2023
Chris Scott's Avatar
Super Moderator
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 4,779
Fried clutch I presume (rental bike; sandy tracks in WA).
Someone suggested it locks the clutch solid which is a sort of solution.

Assuming they mean not actually cut into 2 pieces but just score it then fold into a 'C' semi circle, would that jam a clutch?
But if the plates are slipping then they're slipping.
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 31 Jul 2023
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Belper, uk, EUROPE
Posts: 525
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Scott View Post
Fried clutch I presume (rental bike; sandy tracks in WA).
Someone suggested it locks the clutch solid which is a sort of solution.

Assuming they mean not actually cut into 2 pieces but just score it then fold into a 'C' semi circle, would that jam a clutch?
But if the plates are slipping then they're slipping.
I read it as a metal plate that you can eat off.
__________________
You will have to do without pocket handkerchiefs, and a great many other things, before we reach our journey's end, Bilbo Baggins. You were born to the rolling hills and little rivers of the Shire, but home is now behind you. The world is ahead.
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 31 Jul 2023
Chris Scott's Avatar
Super Moderator
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 4,779
Me too initially, but that's even more baffling.
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 1 Aug 2023
Turbofurball's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: Catalunya
Posts: 257
The more you think about it the weirder it gets ... I guess if a clutch plate was doubled over the whole thing would be misaligned which might cause it to jamb enough to be useable (?) afterwards I imagine the whole basket would be knackered though.
__________________
FreeBSD fan since before it was cool ...
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 1 Aug 2023
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Tartu, Estonia
Posts: 1,031
Not a bike repair, but half way through a month-long trip, as I checked into a small rural Swiss pub as my overnight stay, I found that my riding pants had ripped at the seam. Right on the buttcrack.

Solution? A couple of layers of black gaffer tape. Got me as far as the nearest Detlev Louis store on the back side of Austria, and having not found anything appealing in their stock, it actually got me all the way back home to Estonia without too much embarassment.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Home-made alternative to bungees PocketHead TRAVEL Hints and Tips 14 24 Jul 2012 17:41
Home made air filter carwyn Yamaha Tech 1 29 Mar 2009 22:47
Home made insect repellants apattrick Staying Healthy on the Road 20 26 Nov 2007 21:11
home made pannier severin Other Bikes Tech 5 22 May 2007 06:46
DR 650 SE Home-made pannier rack beddhist Suzuki Tech 6 31 Mar 2007 07:33

 
 

Announcements

Thinking about traveling? Not sure about the whole thing? Watch the HU Achievable Dream Video Trailers and then get ALL the information you need to get inspired and learn how to travel anywhere in the world!

Have YOU ever wondered who has ridden around the world? We did too - and now here's the list of Circumnavigators!
Check it out now
, and add your information if we didn't find you.

Next HU Eventscalendar

HU Event and other updates on the HUBB Forum "Traveller's Advisories" thread.
ALL Dates subject to change.

2024:

Add yourself to the Updates List for each event!

Questions about an event? Ask here

HUBBUK: info

See all event details

 
World's most listened to Adventure Motorbike Show!
Check the RAW segments; Grant, your HU host is on every month!
Episodes below to listen to while you, err, pretend to do something or other...

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

"Ultimate global guide for red-blooded bikers planning overseas exploration. Covers choice & preparation of best bike, shipping overseas, baggage design, riding techniques, travel health, visas, documentation, safety and useful addresses." Recommended. (Grant)



Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance.

Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance™ combines into a single integrated program the best evacuation and rescue with the premier travel insurance coverages designed for adventurers.

Led by special operations veterans, Stanford Medicine affiliated physicians, paramedics and other travel experts, Ripcord is perfect for adventure seekers, climbers, skiers, sports enthusiasts, hunters, international travelers, humanitarian efforts, expeditions and more.

Ripcord travel protection is now available for ALL nationalities, and travel is covered on motorcycles of all sizes!


 

What others say about HU...

"This site is the BIBLE for international bike travelers." Greg, Australia

"Thank you! The web site, The travels, The insight, The inspiration, Everything, just thanks." Colin, UK

"My friend and I are planning a trip from Singapore to England... We found (the HU) site invaluable as an aid to planning and have based a lot of our purchases (bikes, riding gear, etc.) on what we have learned from this site." Phil, Australia

"I for one always had an adventurous spirit, but you and Susan lit the fire for my trip and I'll be forever grateful for what you two do to inspire others to just do it." Brent, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the (video) series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring!" Jennifer, Canada

"Your worldwide organisation and events are the Go To places to for all serious touring and aspiring touring bikers." Trevor, South Africa

"This is the answer to all my questions." Haydn, Australia

"Keep going the excellent work you are doing for Horizons Unlimited - I love it!" Thomas, Germany

Lots more comments here!



Five books by Graham Field!

Diaries of a compulsive traveller
by Graham Field
Book, eBook, Audiobook

"A compelling, honest, inspiring and entertaining writing style with a built-in feel-good factor" Get them NOW from the authors' website and Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, Amazon.co.uk.



Back Road Map Books and Backroad GPS Maps for all of Canada - a must have!

New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80G/S.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events all over the world with the help of volunteers; we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, or ask questions on the HUBB. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:45.