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Which Bike? Comments and Questions on what is the best bike for YOU, for YOUR trip. Note that we believe that ANY bike will do, so please remember that it's all down to PERSONAL OPINION. Technical Questions for all brands go in their own forum.
Photo by Igor Djokovic, camping above San Juan river, Arizona USA

I haven't been everywhere...
but it's on my list!


Photo by Igor Djokovic,
camping above San Juan river,
Arizona USA



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  #46  
Old 23 Jun 2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gipper View Post
You might have a long weight for either of those bikes unfortunately - Id be buying one too, as long as the motor is not too highly strung!


What is the price of the CCM 450 in the UK? I know they are expensive here in Canada ($12,000 + CAD)


At least with the WR250 you can easily put the Athena 290 kit in and give it a bit more pep
I was quoted £9,000 for a 2016 CCM450. So about $17,000CAD....

I could pick up a few used ones, but they still sit upwards of £6,000.
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  #47  
Old 23 Jun 2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Super Sonic Rocketship View Post
I was quoted £9,000 for a 2016 CCM450. So about $17,000CAD....

I could pick up a few used ones, but they still sit upwards of £6,000.
Ouch!

If you have lots of time to do your trip then I would just go with the CRF, it will cost you a bunch more cash to get WR's sorted out and that is money that can be used to travel, at the end of your trip whichever bike you buy will be worth very little and need a full overhaul.
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  #48  
Old 24 Jun 2016
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Originally Posted by Gipper View Post
Ouch!

If you have lots of time to do your trip then I would just go with the CRF, it will cost you a bunch more cash to get WR's sorted out and that is money that can be used to travel, at the end of your trip whichever bike you buy will be worth very little and need a full overhaul.
I still haven't seen numbers on it. Until then it's speculation.
If it does I agree.

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  #49  
Old 24 Jun 2016
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Well folks, it's a sad day. After around a fortnight of research I can announce that it seems that the WRR is, by almost all means and measures, not a viable option option for a UK based overlander.

Here's the problems for anyone else in my situation:

1 - The UK market has only a very limited supply of leftover '08 and '09 models left on the island. Most of these are high mileage, many never received the appropriate recalls and due to lack of supply are selling way too high. The best one I had seen was a 2009 with 7,000 miles, not in the best condition, no recalls complete... asking £3,000. But hey... At least it was never used off road right... right?

2 - So next port of call would be to a buy a European bike, bring it home and register it here! Excellent idea. Except of course half of Europe also cut the model from Yamaha dealership floors in 2010. Again, few models, poor condition and high prices.

3 - Registration. The UK has an exceptionally easy vehicle registration process. The rest of Europe requires you provide a residence permit and proof of insurance before you can register.

4 - Exporting is even more confusing. The process of getting export plates for the bike in most Euro countries makes the process slow and awkward. The export and import back to the UK will add around £300 to each bike.

5 - Shipping the bike home is another big expense. Hell, even if i just rode the bike home, uninsured, untaxed and undeclared it would still cost me a ferry + 1,000 miles in fuel per bike. Just to get to the start point.

The reality is that if you live in the UK and hope to get your hands on a UK registered WR250R, you are looking at upwards of £5,500 for a decent used model. A Brand new one closer to £7,500, or a rubbish one here for £3,000

It leaves me in a pretty crap position now. I have 2 big adventure bikes here that I have no desire to ride across Asia. And a vastly limited supply of small bikes that are up to the task.

It might just be that the CRF250L and KTM 690 are the only options that exist for us. Research and test riding the CRF has led to believe that the bike is, although perhaps up to the task, would be boring, under-powered and uninspiring.

The KTM, a bike I never really raised in this thread, is bigger, taller, heavier, more expensive and many magnitudes less reliable than i'd ever hope to go on this trip.

What am I do to! I am due to be back on the road within a week, and I have no bike!

Aaaaargh
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  #50  
Old 24 Jun 2016
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Just take the gs

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  #51  
Old 24 Jun 2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tmotten View Post
I still haven't seen numbers on it. Until then it's speculation.
If it does I agree.

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Now you've read the numbers below do you agree?



Quote:
Originally Posted by Super Sonic Rocketship View Post
Well folks, it's a sad day. After around a fortnight of research I can announce that it seems that the WRR is, by almost all means and measures, not a viable option option for a UK based overlander.

Here's the problems for anyone else in my situation:

1 - The UK market has only a very limited supply of leftover '08 and '09 models left on the island. Most of these are high mileage, many never received the appropriate recalls and due to lack of supply are selling way too high. The best one I had seen was a 2009 with 7,000 miles, not in the best condition, no recalls complete... asking £3,000. But hey... At least it was never used off road right... right?

2 - So next port of call would be to a buy a European bike, bring it home and register it here! Excellent idea. Except of course half of Europe also cut the model from Yamaha dealership floors in 2010. Again, few models, poor condition and high prices.

3 - Registration. The UK has an exceptionally easy vehicle registration process. The rest of Europe requires you provide a residence permit and proof of insurance before you can register.

4 - Exporting is even more confusing. The process of getting export plates for the bike in most Euro countries makes the process slow and awkward. The export and import back to the UK will add around £300 to each bike.

5 - Shipping the bike home is another big expense. Hell, even if i just rode the bike home, uninsured, untaxed and undeclared it would still cost me a ferry + 1,000 miles in fuel per bike. Just to get to the start point.

The reality is that if you live in the UK and hope to get your hands on a UK registered WR250R, you are looking at upwards of £5,500 for a decent used model. A Brand new one closer to £7,500, or a rubbish one here for £3,000

It leaves me in a pretty crap position now. I have 2 big adventure bikes here that I have no desire to ride across Asia. And a vastly limited supply of small bikes that are up to the task.

It might just be that the CRF250L and KTM 690 are the only options that exist for us. Research and test riding the CRF has led to believe that the bike is, although perhaps up to the task, would be boring, under-powered and uninspiring.

The KTM, a bike I never really raised in this thread, is bigger, taller, heavier, more expensive and many magnitudes less reliable than i'd ever hope to go on this trip.

What am I do to! I am due to be back on the road within a week, and I have no bike!

Aaaaargh

The only other smaller capacity bike worth considering is the DRZ 400, but you are starting to climb in weight and are not far off the 600 cc bikes, but with a bigger tank and better seat they are pretty good travel bikes that can take a serious beating, but they are probably getting rare too. Either change your trip plans or as tmotten says take the GS's
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'00 Discovery Series 2 V8
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  #52  
Old 24 Jun 2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gipper View Post
Now you've read the numbers below do you agree?
I think he should buy mine.

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  #53  
Old 25 Jun 2016
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I was just surfing on hubb and found this thread
Right now I am doing a small world trip on a klx250. I used to ride 750cc engines, so the acceleration and top speed of the 250 is crap, but in rough Terrain, I just love the klx. Easy riding, Stairs to the Hotel Lobby is no problem at all. Moreover I had a few Situations, where I nearly dropped the bike, but with that Weight I managed to keep it stable.

The cons: Bad Aftermarket, slow travelling Speed (~95km/h), less space in comparison to other motorcylces.

After 6 weeks riding ( 44 weeks still to ride) sometimes I miss the power on Highway, but I love the Agility.
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  #54  
Old 26 Jun 2016
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So all this makes me want to keep my WRR forever Havin both a WRR and a KTM 690 enduro, I must say they are - of course - completely different beasts. For a long haul trip in Asia I'd choose the WRR any day. And if I could have only one bike, it'd be the WRR too. Much more versatile despite its shortcomings.
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  #55  
Old 26 Jun 2016
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One thing worth considering about the klx is that you can easily de-restrict it. That would give it nearly as much power as the wrr, with a top speed of about 130 km/h. Should work on any >2009 efi model.

Anleitung zum Entdrosseln des Drehzahlbegrenzers der Kawasaki KLX250
Derestrict klx250 2009 EFI for FREE - KLX/KLR 125/140/250/300 - ThumperTalk
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  #56  
Old 26 Jun 2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gipper View Post
Now you've read the numbers below do you agree?






The only other smaller capacity bike worth considering is the DRZ 400, but you are starting to climb in weight and are not far off the 600 cc bikes, but with a bigger tank and better seat they are pretty good travel bikes that can take a serious beating, but they are probably getting rare too. Either change your trip plans or as tmotten says take the GS's
DRZ 400 is actually harder to acquire than a WRR!

The GS's just aren't an option for us. They have almost zero real-world off road ability.

Quote:
Originally Posted by moosi View Post
I was just surfing on hubb and found this thread
Right now I am doing a small world trip on a klx250. I used to ride 750cc engines, so the acceleration and top speed of the 250 is crap, but in rough Terrain, I just love the klx. Easy riding, Stairs to the Hotel Lobby is no problem at all. Moreover I had a few Situations, where I nearly dropped the bike, but with that Weight I managed to keep it stable.

The cons: Bad Aftermarket, slow travelling Speed (~95km/h), less space in comparison to other motorcylces.

After 6 weeks riding ( 44 weeks still to ride) sometimes I miss the power on Highway, but I love the Agility.
That's encouraging to hear about the KLX. How are you finding the service intervals on the road?

Quote:
Originally Posted by indu View Post
So all this makes me want to keep my WRR forever Havin both a WRR and a KTM 690 enduro, I must say they are - of course - completely different beasts. For a long haul trip in Asia I'd choose the WRR any day. And if I could have only one bike, it'd be the WRR too. Much more versatile despite its shortcomings.
Aaah rub it in why don't you.

Due purely to lack of options. I have been looking at the KTM690's. It seems there was a few revisions in 2013 making the bike lower. I wonder how they are doing with the horrible reliability record.

How's your 690 holding up? And what year is it?... Just in case it comes to the unthinkable
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  #57  
Old 27 Jun 2016
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Is the WR250R worth the hassle over a CRF250L

Just go with the CRF250L it is great for traveling outside europe. Also the most reliable bike I know. As soon as you leave the modern world you will have the most powerfull bike around;-). If you are worried about the power difference between the WRR and the CRFL, maybe the 250 league is not for you...

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  #58  
Old 27 Jun 2016
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What's your route that you feel you need that ability?
I wouldn't consider a drz. I replaced mine for a wet. The drz is a way better trail bike but not fun on the open stuff.

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  #59  
Old 27 Jun 2016
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iO@SuperSonicRocketship:
The Service Intervall is 12000km. So it's quite ok. I will do it Pakistan in 2 weeks. In Pakistan I am not sure if the bike is sold, but in India and asia it is, therefore the service should not be a Problem.

If you take the Honda,wrr or klx is just about riding each bike and decide then. I bought the klx, because you can adjust the Springs and the exhaust is stainless steel. The Honda is a bit more comfortable for me, but I bought a airhawk for the klx. The wrr was too expensive for me. I wanna spend that money on the trip.


Today I had a exercise day, I wanted to ride on a dried salt Lake. It was fun, but I went to far in the middle of the lake. There it wasn't dry and I screwed up.
It was 45°C and nothing to put under the tire. So I just unpacked and laid the bike aside, pulled it and lifted it. With this Weight possible. I sweated like hell

Edit: I am not experienced Rider on such a condition. So next time I won't stop for a photo
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Is the WR250R worth the hassle over a CRF250L-img_20160627_125958.jpg  

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  #60  
Old 28 Jun 2016
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Mossi, how do you find your klx after a while? how is gearing?
I know suspension is better then crf.
I thinking about trading mine crf250l for it
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