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Which Bike? Comments and Questions on what is the best bike for YOU, for YOUR trip. Note that we believe that ANY bike will do, so please remember that it's all down to PERSONAL OPINION. Technical Questions for all brands go in their own forum.
Photo by Igor Djokovic, camping above San Juan river, Arizona USA

I haven't been everywhere...
but it's on my list!


Photo by Igor Djokovic,
camping above San Juan river,
Arizona USA



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  • 1 Post By colebatch

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  #1  
Old 18 Feb 2012
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long distance on a Yam WR 250 R enduro inconveniences ?

hello,

anybody knows on the (technical?) inconveniences off long distance traveling on a bike like Yamaha WR 250 /450 R (in Belgium Enduro = streetlegal)?
Exept for a bigger tank and a better seat (bodger, no probl.)

what about servicing, oil changes...other?
will this engine last? (they are so popular that I they should be strong I guess, but off course it is a different use of this engine ?

anybody experienced this ?
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  #2  
Old 18 Feb 2012
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Polly,
Can't help with that - I am still running old Yam technology - but I've run the HUBB search for "WR250" because I have seen a few threads about this bike in the past but I can't remember where they are, or would be:-

Horizons Unlimited Motorcycle Travel Search

You could also try a google search using "WR250" and "HUBB" - often recommended in here as being better than the in-house search function.

Hah!
I've just been reading this thread which has nothing to do with the WR250 in its' title but it contains quite a bit of information about the WR250, along the way:-
http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hub...-world-58966-2
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Last edited by Walkabout; 18 Feb 2012 at 12:07.
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  #3  
Old 18 Feb 2012
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Poly,

This thread over on Advrider.com is good reading on WR250R:

Yamaha WR250R Mega Thread - ADVrider

That should keep you busy for a while. For long distance riding ignore all the performance modifications and fuel/exhaust changes. Keeping the bike as close to stock as possible is best for long term reliability, fuel economy, future parts availability and your pocketbook. Save your money for aftermarket larger fuel tank, luggage rack and bags.

This fellow has taken his WR250R on several long dual sport adventures and racked up nearly 30,000 trouble free miles:

2008WR250R

probably a better website for your needs since he limited himself to very practical modifications for long distance dual sport riding rather than dumping a lot of time and money into trying to make a slow bike go fast.

In answer to your question, the main inconveniences of the WR for long distance travel are tall seat height, small fuel capacity, uncomfortable seat, and low luggage carrying capacity.

The main advantages are bulletproof motor, light weight/easy to pick up or throw in a canoe, Yamaha reliability, good fuel economy, reasonable top speed, high offroad clearance, fuel injection, nice wide ratio six speed gearbox, 350 watt alternator, electric start.

Since I am under 6 ft. tall, I personally prefer the reliable less expensive little Kawasaki 250 Super Sherpa with lower seat height, electric start, 6 speeds, and stainless exhaust. 250 dirt bikes are ideal for third world travel and are considered medium to large size in most countries outside of Europe and the U.S.

Best luck!

Kindest regards,
John Downs
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South America and back on a 250 Super Sherpa Minimalist Adventure http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=831076

Last edited by John Downs; 18 Feb 2012 at 20:21.
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  #4  
Old 18 Feb 2012
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Hello, ThnX
Nice information and links,
For shure, I do not fancy changes apart from tank, seat and soft luggage rack

I have another question on .... what about WR 125 R (but I'll start another post on this )
Thnx,I'll be back for sure
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  #5  
Old 22 Feb 2012
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I absolutely love my WR250R. I've got just a hair under 31,000 miles on it and it runs like new still. I'm even dragging the old girl to Alaska here in a couple weeks.

The tall seat height hasn't been a problem for me, but I have a 31" inseam and can usually get at least the ball of each foot down no problem. Luggage capacity is fine too. I found the seat to be bearable with a sheepskin pad, but there are several upgrades available (seat concepts new foam and rubber, sargent, corbin). I've had upwards of 60 pounds of luggage (or 130 pounds of girlfriend) on the back and no issues. I've seen some of these seriously overloaded by people thinking they need to carry everything in the world with them and have yet to see a subframe problem.

Fuel range is the only real concern, particularly with the stock 2.1gal (US) tank. I have an IMS 3.1gal which I think is about perfect for the bike, as it adds an extra gallon without making the bike wider. My usually average of 50-55mpg nets me a minimum 150 mile range on pavement and local riding, touring where I'm riding easier usually nets 60-70mpg. There's also a Safari/Aqualine 3.7gal and a IMS 4.5+gal tank, for when you need to go really really far... and if you go with the Wolfman expedition saddlebags you can also get the rotopax adapter plate for the left side of the bike to add an extra 2 gallons.

In fact, there really aren't any problems with this bike. They just run and run and run and run...
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  #6  
Old 24 Feb 2012
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Ed (Edteamslr) on this forum has (last summer) travelled from London to Magadan on a WR250 ... he would be a good source of advice.

Ed’s WR250R | Brighton 2 Siberia
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  #7  
Old 24 Feb 2012
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No

Quote:
Originally Posted by Polly View Post
Hello, ThnX
Nice information and links,
For shure, I do not fancy changes apart from tank, seat and soft luggage rack

I have another question on .... what about WR 125 R (but I'll start another post on this )
Thnx,I'll be back for sure
The wr125r is not the same bike at all. The 250 is a seriously well made bike. The quality of the components and the engineering is up there with the flagship R1 (hence the ridiculous Retail Price when new) whereas the 125 is just a smart 125/entry-level ride. The 125 is not a small capacity version of the 250.

I'm not commenting on the 125s overlanding ability just that it should not be confused with it's larger cousin.
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Find out details of my 2011 trip to Siberia on a lightweight dirtbike:
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Old 24 Feb 2012
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Great bike. fuel range is fine

The stock tank is too small. Refilling every 90miles is not good enough for most people. I used the safari tank and can say that a 200mile range is much more practical for Africa or Russia. The IMS tank would have been even better because I took a 7litre fuel bladder for the rare occasions that I needed more range and if I had had the IMS I would have never bothered filling the bladder, just kept it on hand for crossing Turkmenistan or doing unforeseen distances.

Answer.. Don't worry. Safari or IMS 4.5 are fine on the WR. The fuel injection is good enough to ensure that the bike will make the distance that you calculate mathematically regardless of the terrain or altitude. It's this confidence that is worth more than the absolute fuel margin you need when planning the distances.
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  #9  
Old 29 Feb 2012
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hello, Thanks everybody for interesting responses and links

I am very much aware that the WR 125 is NOT a small WR 250, thats why I started a different post "WR 125 for long distance"

Both are interesting bikes for different ways of traveling
Thanks
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  #10  
Old 15 Sep 2017
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WOW!!!

Ive finally found a thread about adventure riding on a WR250!!!

I bought myself a 2004 (ex police bike) the full on enduro version (WR250F) so no indicators/mirrors/igntion switch ha ha

Was bought a while back purely for greenlaning/trail riding with my brother and rarely sees tarmac (although does have full MOT). When I began looking for a bike for overland adventures, I'd all but written of my little WR because although it's brilliant off road, I found it excruciatingly painful on my poor backside after a full days hard riding (150miles off road).

But then discovered that this could all be changed with the addition of a Corbin seat?

Did you change yours?
Did you ever do any long trips?

Love my little WR and it all but bullet proof and what a brilliant off road weapon it is, though Id want higher gearing for extended road work necessary to get to places where Id need that serious off road ability.

Would love to hear how you got on???
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  #11  
Old 22 Oct 2017
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I did 2-3 long distance trips on my WR250R. She was running for 12 hrs at 10000rpm with no complain. She was great. Light, nimble, easy to maintain, 40mpg, and when with a 4.7 gallon tank she would go for 200-250 miles.
I replaced the stock pegs with wider ones; I raised the handlebar and I used a 14-tooth sprocket to soften the engine at highway speeds (65-70 mph).

Great bike!
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  #12  
Old 23 Oct 2017
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I've got a 2007 WR250F and would certainly agree they are awesome offroad bikes. The tank capacity is fine for 70-100 miles offroading but should stretch to 120+ on the road I believe. Of course, that is a bit slim for serious overlanding but you can get big Acerbis tanks that would cure that problem. The other issue that can be cured is the seat, which is narrow and hard and literally agony after less than an hour. OK for day trips green laning but would absolutely have to be changed if you plan to spend all day on it. It's also quite high but that's just the price you pay for a bike with good offroad capabilities.

I haven't done any heavy mileage on mine but I'd be a bit reluctant for a couple of reasons. Firstly a 250 with the best will in the world is going to struggle on an open road with a load of luggage. They aren't designed for continuous high speed use and I would be concerned about longevity. Secondly the sump only holds just over a litre of oil so this is being worked very hard and if it does burn any you'll run out very quickly. Anyhoo I wouldn't rule one out, there is no 'perfect' RTW bike, they all have pros and cons and the WR is no exception.

Saying that somebody'll probably come along next with stories of how he's been round the world 3 times on one towing a trailer without an oil change
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