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Which Bike? Comments and Questions on what is the best bike for YOU, for YOUR trip. Note that we believe that ANY bike will do, so please remember that it's all down to PERSONAL OPINION. Technical Questions for all brands go in their own forum.
Photo by Igor Djokovic, camping above San Juan river, Arizona USA

I haven't been everywhere...
but it's on my list!


Photo by Igor Djokovic,
camping above San Juan river,
Arizona USA



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  #31  
Old 22 Mar 2017
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Looks like there are a few guys here who have a lot of experience traveling with the KLX. They may not respond here.

You could also look on KLX specific forums or on ADV Rider Thumper forums on KLX threads. There are several ... very long threads but most are still active with LOTS of KLX riders who may offer help and ideas about travel on your bike.

Good luck!
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  #32  
Old 23 Mar 2017
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I can't offer any suggestions as to spare parts which are unique to the KLX250s as mine never had a single failure during the entire time I owned it. However, if I were to embark on a long trip on this bike I'd get rid of one issue before leaving i.e. the typical annoying reluctance to come to life when cold. In my original post I described the carbureted KLX as a moody cold starter - inexcusable really for a modern motorcycle.

It seems to be a common problem that I routinely experienced. The solution consensus seems to involve drilling out the starter jet slightly. Perhaps, Prousemouse, you've already addressed it. Safe travels to you.
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  #33  
Old 23 Mar 2017
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prousemouse View Post
hey guys,
about to take my klx250s from Alaska to Patagonia.
i need to create a spare parts kit and was wondering what you would recommend.
thanks!
T
Couple more ideas ...
More important than carrying spare parts would be to do a really good Pre-Trip Prep on your bike before departure.

Learning your bike INSIDE and OUT also can really help ... knowing where problems may appear and how to fix them ... and head them off with good prep before they ever happen.

Ever done a LONG multi-month trip on a bike before?

Lots of potential problems can be avoided ... also the need to carry spare parts ... simply by doing really good pre-trip prep.

Here are just a few things I would do before my trip:
1. Fit NEW quality DID X-Ring chain and NEW OEM sprockets, carry TWO spare
front sprockets and change them out every 10,000 miles (16K km)
Changing front sprockets will extend chain life by 5,000 miles or more.

2. New name brand, quality Battery. (Yuasa, Deka)

3. Tires: start with NEW tires and quality real rubber tubes. Carry at least 2 spare tubes. (I carry 3) Think about your tires and know how many miles you will get out of your rear tire. Your front should last over 10,000 miles. Rear?
I'm guessing on a loaded KLX, maybe 5K to 6K miles? (10k km)

If starting in Alaska, then you should plan to fit NEW tires near US/Mexico border. This set of tires should get you to Colombia, where tires are readily available versus other countries en route. Some carry a spare rear tire on rear rack. (I did, but I was on a 650, your 250 rear tire should last longer)

4. If you are thinking of packing spare cables, maybe think twice. I prefer to fit NEW cables before departure if they are in question. Once done, you are good for at least 25,000 miles, so no cable worries, no need to carry spares on board. OEM Japanese cables last a LONG time if unmolested. Never use after market cables like Motion Pro (Crap!). OEM only!

5. Make sure ALL your bearings are in PERFECT condition: Wheel and Hubb bearings, Swing Arm bearings, Steering head bearings should ALL be perfect and freshly greased.

If questionable ... replace with new bearings. No need to carry spares unless doing lots of underwater riding. Keep Salt Water off your wheels, bearings and such or rinse ASAP after exposure. Remember: Bearings of ALL types are available at most large truck or Auto parts stores in Latin America.

6. Make sure ALL your wiring is perfect. The more mods you make to lighting, heated gear and other mods, means you have potential for failure.

I would carry small elec. Quik-connectors, wire, fuses, multi-meter. Make sure any elec. mods are done perfectly ... or they will FAIL down the trail. Know your wiring and know where to look if you have a problem ... it's almost always
where a "mod" has been done.

7. SEAT - IMO, very important and underrated. A pad or Sheep skin is not going to get it. A quality custom seat, wider than the skinny plank on stock KLX will make a huge difference in your long day comfort. Home made efforts rarely compare.

8. Spare Nut & Bolt kit.
Make up a kit of common OEM sizes using quality Japanese nuts and bolts. Include washers, springs, spacers, long and short, big and small. I've maintained kits like this over 25 years ... it's mostly my riding buddies who end up using my
nut/bolt stash.

The rest is just basic prep, going over fasteners using BLUE Loc-Tite checking tightness of everything. If a particular part of the engine leaks oil, then pack spare gaskets as needed. (hard to find South of the border)

Do as much research as you can handle to learn ALL about your KLX. But remember, the dirt bike riders will have problems you will never likely have.
With good prep I'd guess you'll have little trouble with your KLX, but the more knowledge you have, the better.
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  #34  
Old 28 Mar 2017
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I Rode a klx250s from Germany to Malaysia. 42000 km in this trip. 56000km total in Bike.

My modifications:
- handlebarrisers
- handlebar
- handguards
- skidplate
- Scottoiler
- luggagerack
- Supportbracket for rear Frame
- airhawk Seat pillow
- wider footpegs

What I would do different next time:
- bigger fueltank
- windshield
- additional LED

Things, which Broke:
- 43000km steering Bearing
- subframe snapped, because i jumped to high with luggage
- and thats all. F***** reliable bike!

My Front sprockets were gone after 14tkm. (Sand and salt)

If you have any questions, feel free to ask...
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  #35  
Old 14 Apr 2017
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I noticed none of the comments on this thread talk about getting more power out of it which is typically what the KLX250s threads I've seen go into a lot: i.e. aftermarket exhausts, air box mods, EJK controllers, sprocket/gearing ratios etc.

Any thoughts on this from the long distance users?
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  #36  
Old 14 Apr 2017
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Lots of KLX threads over on ADV Rider about Big Bore kits ... IMO, the only really effective way to get more HP/Torque.

On a Travel bike ... torque is the important one. And there are some really good kits out there that seem quite reliable. Of course anytime you add CC's you create more heat ... which will ultimately reduce long term reliability. But relatively cheap to rebuild and even with a 330cc kit ... you probably could still run about 50,000 km before going inside.

Once you do the big bore, the rest is almost superfluous.

Good luck!
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  #37  
Old 14 Apr 2017
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My rationale for a travel bike is to leave the motor near standard for good economy, longevity and less noise. All the things moosi lists are for this purpose. If you think you need more power, get a bigger bike as with a 250, above all it's the light weight we're after. I'm on a pokier WR250R now but I can't say it's night and day over last year's [carb] KLX. Both great bikes: light + good suspension.
I recall reading on the efis you can hack the clutch cut-out switch on the bars which otherwise restricts power in upper gears?
https://www.thumpertalk.com/forums/t...-efi-for-free/

Unfortunately the gap between grunty 650s and light 250s remains annoyingly wide.

Last edited by Chris Scott; 14 Apr 2017 at 11:07.
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  #38  
Old 14 Apr 2017
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Yeah U can "mod" the efi bike. Instead of 7500rpm it will run until 9/10500 rpm (not sure anymore)

I forgot to mention, that I replaced the original exhaust with GPR. Saves quite a few kg...
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  #39  
Old 14 Apr 2017
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Kawasaki KLX250s As a D/S Tourer - My Report

Hi,

I'm a big fan of the KLX250 supermoto version (KLX250SF) for its a light weight bike with a big look and almost trouble free. Mine is a 2014 fuel injected version and now has taken 28k km.

The supermoto version is more comfortable for the ride I did, which roughly 70% on hard tarmac and 30% off-road. The difference of rake angle made the bike handling better on curvy roads compared to the pure d/s version.

The main mods I did to my bike:
- replace the front 17 inch wheel to a 19"
- windshield
- offroad lights
- replace the factory seat with a Sargent touring seat (this really make huge difference)
- add a rack for top luggage and side bags or panniers
- aluminum skid plate

The KLX250 is an awesome bike in my opinion, especially when you are traveling in the South East Asian countries where many attractions are hidden at remote distances from the highway.

My only problem is of course the very short tank range of about 150km due to the small fuel tank capacity. To overcome this I have to bring a couple of 1 liter fuel bottles for spare fuel. There are some aftermarket fuel tanks available with significant fuel carrying capacity, but they are very pricey.

Overall, I'm very happy to have a KLX250sf as my D/S Tourer



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  #40  
Old 29 Apr 2017
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moosi View Post
Yeah U can "mod" the efi bike. Instead of 7500rpm it will run until 9/10500 rpm (not sure anymore)

I forgot to mention, that I replaced the original exhaust with GPR. Saves quite a few kg...
Did you eliminate the o2 sensor? And what about opening g the air box for better airflow?

Sent from my X5pro using Tapatalk
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  #41  
Old 29 Apr 2017
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Great looking result from your mods Rendra-H.

Interesting that you still only get 150 km. out of a tank of gas despite having fuel injection. As I noted in my original post I was getting 140 km. with the strangled carbureted version.

Also interesting that you seem to manage do some serious travelling with only a couple of extra litres of gas. I was carrying ten extra and definitely needed them.
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  #42  
Old 2 May 2017
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trninka View Post
Did you eliminate the o2 sensor? And what about opening g the air box for better airflow?

Sent from my X5pro using Tapatalk
Yes, first I used the "clutch"-hack, but then I went to a Thai workshop specialized on klx250 during my trip. They taped the o2 sensor.

I cutted the snorkel of the air box. Not sure, if this improves the airflow.
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  #43  
Old 9 Oct 2017
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rendra-hertiadhi View Post
Hi,

I'm a big fan of the KLX250 supermoto version (KLX250SF) for its a light weight bike with a big look and almost trouble free. Mine is a 2014 fuel injected version and now has taken 28k km.

The supermoto version is more comfortable for the ride I did, which roughly 70% on hard tarmac and 30% off-road. The difference of rake angle made the bike handling better on curvy roads compared to the pure d/s version.

The main mods I did to my bike:
- replace the front 17 inch wheel to a 19"
- windshield
- offroad lights
- replace the factory seat with a Sargent touring seat (this really make huge difference)
- add a rack for top luggage and side bags or panniers
- aluminum skid plate

The KLX250 is an awesome bike in my opinion, especially when you are traveling in the South East Asian countries where many attractions are hidden at remote distances from the highway.

My only problem is of course the very short tank range of about 150km due to the small fuel tank capacity. To overcome this I have to bring a couple of 1 liter fuel bottles for spare fuel. There are some aftermarket fuel tanks available with significant fuel carrying capacity, but they are very pricey.

Overall, I'm very happy to have a KLX250sf as my D/S Tourer



I am VERY interested to talk to you about this setup. Specifically tires, windshield, seat, etc. Are you able to PM me? If not I would like to give you my email address. Thank you.
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  #44  
Old 9 Oct 2017
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Talking of KLX 250S, for 2018 Kawa USA will finally be selling the efi model we had'/have in Europe and Asia for years.
Not sure if it is just a paint makeover or more to it.
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  #45  
Old 13 Dec 2017
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Well, I still hope that there is going to be a bigger aftermarket fuel tank

Beginning 2019 I start for my second trip (Germany to South Africa and back) and I am still having issues with carrying enough fuel. The biggest aftermarket tank only holds 11 Liters (3 Gallons?!), which is surely not enough.

Until now I had the stock fuel tank and 7l as reserve (9€ Canister on ebay), but I was quite annoyed by that setup. Now I am thinking about buying 2 of these Fuelbladders an mount them left and right next to the fuel tank. Mounting them back on the rear frame is not an option. The frame is already fully loaded with gear and quite weak. ;D
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