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Which Bike? Comments and Questions on what is the best bike for YOU, for YOUR trip. Note that we believe that ANY bike will do, so please remember that it's all down to PERSONAL OPINION. Technical Questions for all brands go in their own forum.
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  #61  
Old 31 Aug 2014
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Scott View Post
I agree. Oil pan-stabbing hardware aside, plastic plates are just for show or to disguise clutter. I first saw one on the original 650 Transalp in the late 80s. How we scoffed. What next, a chocolate piston?

If you take it on the dirt it has to be full-width metal. DIY if no one makes them yet. Interruptions to the journey are all very well, but it only takes one unlucky hit to ruin your day.
So true ... one good hit can really spell disaster.
There are trade offs with metal vs. plastic bash plate however. In some cases the plastic bash guards are sort of sacrificial in nature ... they tend to "give" and absorb a hit. A good one is not all that bad. Carbon fiber ones are quite common on race bikes.

With a Metal guard, a big hit won't hurt the metal guard itself, but the force of the hit is transferred to the mounting points ... and this is when you can break your case or oil pan if mounted directly to your engine case. I've seen this happen in person.

Plastics are pretty amazing things ... a good plastic guard may be preferable in some circumstances for it's ability to "Flex" and take a hit and not transfer force into the engine case. But for true, knarly "rock hopping" a properly mounted metal bash plate would be the go for me.
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  #62  
Old 31 Aug 2014
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Nope, Abs cant be switched off
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  #63  
Old 31 Aug 2014
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Originally Posted by GaryD12345 View Post
So after 7500 miles i am still really enjoying this bike but then i use it on 99% tarmac.

i was thinking i would update this thread with a pros and cons list in the order i thought about them.

Pros:
-good MPG. my average is 72.8 uk gal 3.9L/100km 25.7km/l
-nice seating position
-very smooth engine
-decent tank range i fill up at 200 before hitting reserve shoud be good for 230/240
-multiple luggage options
-8000 miles service interval
-good visabilty of road ahead
-good mirrors: narrow enough for filtering but very clear wide view behind
-easy to drive: not fatiguing
-abs
-well balanced tight turning circle.
-medium weight, not too heavy
Nice list of positives! With high fuel prices in the UK/EU I can appreciate the excellent fuel economy! Gas is still less than $4 usd/us gallon here ... but we've paid for it with 5000 dead troops(50,000 wounded) and 500,000 dead Iraqi's/Afgani's and a 3 Trillion USD price tag ... with MUCH MORE to come.
Oh Joy! Price of cheap oil.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryD12345 View Post
Cons:
-wind buffering (very loud) even with onda tall screen and wunderlich
Buffeting is common on many bikes and not that easy to eliminate. I hope you are wearing GOOD ear plugs? You WILL go deaf without them!
-seat not that comfy when only wearing kevlar jeans (ok with touring trousers)
At that price point it's no surprise the seat is marginal. If you intend to keep the bike ... 100% worth while to invest in a quality custom seat.

-cheap suspension
Once again. no surprise. Upgrades are possible both front and rear.
-inaccurate mpg computer
... you mean like every motorcycle ever made?
-no dipstick to check oil, only viewing window.
Why would you ever want a Dip Stick? Sight glass is THE ONLY WAY!
-right brake leaver snapped off twice from drops
Wow! You must fall down a lot! Be careful out there mate! Takes a pretty good whack to snap off a brake lever
-hingless fuel cap
Caps with hinges get bent or tweaked. Then they don't work. Better off without a hinge, IMHO
-side winds impact more than other bikes of same weight that i ahve ridden
You may reduce wind affect after suspension and geometry upgrades
as a tarmac touring bike this is a very capable bike. gravel roads ive been on have been fine but havent done any proper off roading and dont intend to.
Excellent to hear!

Edit:
rumour has it that 2014 models dont need the 600mile vale clearance check
No bikes do. a 600 mile valve check is pure BS. A way Honda allow dealers to make some easy money. skip it. After 30 or so new bikes ... never found a brand new bike out of spec at 600 miles

What is your average speed on motorway? Do any vibrations creep in at around 75 mph to 80 mph?
What is top speed?
Have you actually weighed your bike full of petrol?


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  #64  
Old 1 Sep 2014
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It depends on the road strength of head wind and mood but I would think 70-75 is average.
There is some vibration here through the grips but mirrors remain relatively buzz free. Even with thin gloves no numb hands. Infact the Engine is very smooth still and comfortable at this speed with passing power left. I have just been riding in france and at 110kph the engine is at around 5200/8500 on the rev range. Peak power comes in at around 7300 if I remember correctly.

top speed is reported 110mph. I have not been this fast but from what i have seen I believe this is achievable. I feel this bike could maintain 90-95mph constantly with mpg and comfort taking a big hit.

Last edited by GaryD12345; 15 Sep 2014 at 18:57.
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  #65  
Old 2 Nov 2014
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Hi Scott (great name!), i own a CB500X having done around 7500kms on it so far. I've researched the nobbly tyres option and there is very little for the size wheels that the 500X runs. For matching dual sport tyres front and back, the only brand/model i have found are the Pirelli Mt60's.

As mentioned, there is now a mod for spoked rims; ADVrider - View Single Post - Rally-Raid Products Honda CB500X

Cheers,

Scott.

Quote:
Originally Posted by scott_walker_1 View Post
Hi tigershel

Do you have any suggestions for good off rod tyres matching these specifications?

Front:120/70-17 radial
Rear: 160/60-17 radial

I have spotted these "Continental TKC 80 Twinduro" but have had no previous experience with them.

Thanks

Scott
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  #66  
Old 2 Nov 2014
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Pics of my bike;



Mods done;

- Touring windscreen
- Adjustable levers
- Handguards
- Spongey grips
- centre stand
- Airhawk seat cushion
- Wolfman tank bang and dry duffel
- 12v/5v power supply
- Two Brothers Sports Exhaust

I agree with Gary's assessment and have made a few mods for comfort. The buffeting can get to be a bit much, plus the seat becomes rock hard after a few hours of riding.
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  #67  
Old 2 Nov 2014
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That's a cool looking bike!
Must say, in the top pic things look out of balance with that huge
Wolfman Dry bag on there. Bit out of scale to rest of bike, IMHO.

If you keep the bike and do more touring, perhaps try a set of small to medium sized side panniers? Could allow you to go with a smaller, more in scale dry bag up top. Just a thought.

Might give a more balanced look, and better weight distribution as well with side panniers. (weight low and forward is best)

There are just a few knobby tires out now for 17" rims. I believe both Continental (TKC80) and Kenda (Big Block) may be making such tires in larger 17" sizes now? Check it out. Not cheap but I thing you may find something. TKC's are EXCELLENT and last pretty well too! Kenda's suck.
(just the Big Block, not ALL Kenda's)

BTW, a Pirelli MT60 is NOT a knobby tire, not even a 50/50. What the MT60 really is, is a Race Wet. (for wet roadracing) Good tire but not much good in anything more severe than a simple dirt road, great on wet paved roads. They wear out quick with heavy bike. (I've run a couple of them)

One thing to be aware of ... if you ever ride in serious Mud ... your front mud guard (Fender in Yankee speak) can CLOG up with mud and slow or stop wheel rotation. This happened on my former V-Strom. Had to REMOVE the fender (a major PITA), strap onto bike and get mud in my face for a few hours.
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  #68  
Old 2 Nov 2014
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Thanks. The only reason I haven't gone the panniers route is that I haven't decided whether I'm keeping the bike long term. Most of the things I've bought (tank bag, dry bag) can go onto my next bike, or have been cheap enough to not bother me.

As for the Tyres, "nobbly" was the wrong term to use; I meant there are very few dual sport tyres for those size wheels. Last time I checked it was the Mt60's. The TKC80's had no such option (but it's good news if that's changed) Kenda Big Block's are overkill for this bike IMO as the bike is not a serious offroader, and having offroad tyres on it is a waste of time since you'll mostly be on the road!
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  #69  
Old 3 Nov 2014
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Right. But some riders may go off road, no?
Neither the TKC80 nor Kenda Big Block would be considered "aggressive" in the Knobby tire universe. Both are compromise tires but really do work quite well on both surfaces. Surprisingly GOOD on pavement!

If a rider tours off the beaten path he may find not all roads are paved. With occasional dirt roads, both the above tires are nice to have, especially at the front.

Lots of riders use the "Mullet" method, which is a front knobby, and rear 50/50 like a Mitas, Kenda, Shinko, Heidenau or Mefo. All good and some made in your size for that bike. A good 50/50 rear tire will last a lot longer than a knobby and still do well ON or OFF road, save in mud. Front tires last quite long, even a TKC.

Biggest problem with that beauty of yours is that when it hits the ground it won't be pretty anymore, plastic bits are expensive .... and those Rads may be damaged. If not going off road ... then no worries.
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  #70  
Old 3 Nov 2014
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Originally Posted by mollydog View Post
Right. But some riders may go off road, no?
Neither the TKC80 nor Kenda Big Block would be considered "aggressive" in the Knobby tire universe.
I never said riders wouldn't go offroad. I take mine offroad all the time, and that's with the stock tyres.

The point is, since its not a true dual sport bike and doesn't have the clearance to ride over rocks and driedup riverbeds, I would be aiming for a DS tyre that is more road biased. Why waste money on a 50/50 tyre when the bike is more road biased and is limited in its offroad capabilities? It doesn't have long-travel suspension, or spoked wheels. We've got 17" cast wheels front and back.

TKC80's and Kenda Big Blocks may not be aggressive nobby tyres when compared to everything else out there, but most of the extreme nobby stuff won't fit our bike! In terms of what fits our bike, the big blocks are as "extreme" as I've seen.

The Cb500X owners I've spoken to, and I include myself here, do maybe 10% - 20% offroading at best, and thats generally fire trails. I wouldnt be fitting Big Blocks to a bike that can't handle too much rough stuff as you comprimise the road handling, and that's where these bikes will mostly be. (plus you need to modify the 500X to actually fit the big blocks)


Quote:
Originally Posted by mollydog View Post
Both are compromise tires but really do work quite well on both surfaces. Surprisingly GOOD on pavement!
Yes, but at a trade off in road performance and handling.
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  #71  
Old 8 Nov 2014
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A few days ago I went round a few dealers to see what caught my eye and one of these was about the only thing that looked like what I was looking for. Big enough to carry a fair bit but small enough to manage and pick up easily.

As people have said spares for this bike are hard to come by in the developing world but what spares are needed specifically to do with the 8000 mile service interval? Just sparks, filters, oil need the most attention then brake pads, drive chain and tyres I'd assume would cover most of it and other more major stuff could wait until you get it back home. As a civic type R owner I regularly do nearly double the service interval of 9000 miles between services and have never had a problem. Surely Honda's bikes are the same for reliability.

So lets assume no spares are available anywhere in the world what would you need for definite and what could be allowed to overrun its service interval? Plus do any components require special tools that you would have to carry with you?
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  #72  
Old 12 Nov 2014
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For 17's in the front many run a tire listed for the rear.usually a little larger but doable.
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  #73  
Old 14 Nov 2014
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In january they start selling this bike in Ecuador.
So there will be some spares in stock.
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  #74  
Old 24 Jun 2015
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Has anyone tried the Rally Raid Kit that turns this bike into a true off road machine for an extra $2500? Have been thinking about this bike as a do everything kinda machine but am uncertain. Nice thread btw even if it has been dead since November...

Honda CB500X - Serious consideration for a RTW machine?-cb500x-adventure-005.jpg
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  #75  
Old 24 Jun 2015
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Has anyone tried the Rally Raid Kit...
I don't think anyone has as the kit's are only just arriving but on adv, Jenny Morgan is riding one across the US and back.
Trans-Am 500 - the seven year itch - ADVrider

Also this thread: Rally-Raid Products Honda CB500X - Page 71 - ADVrider

I agree the RRP CB-X could be a real world do-it-all overlander.
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