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Photo by Gregor Zajac, Poland; Crossing Rothang Pass; India 2011 tour, Royal Enfield 350ccm

Adventure is what you make it

Photo by Gregor Zajac, Poland; Crossing Rothang Pass, India 2011 tour, Royal Enfield 350ccm.



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  • 1 Post By Chris Scott
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  • 2 Post By OB-1
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  #1  
Old 7 Sep 2019
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Which Tiger 800 for travelling?

Now they've been around for nearly a decade and are provenly popular, it would be great to have a thread of which Tiger model makes a good overlander and why - or maybe which one doesn't. This is besides the clear cut XR vs XC choice.

Could become a useful sticky.
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  #2  
Old 8 Sep 2019
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I’m happy to make a start Chris, with the significant caveat that so far i have only done 6,500 miles on my 2018 XCx and this has all been on pavement in Europe.

To your XC v XR point i have test ridden both and having bought the XC, it took a week or so to get used go the XC’s 21” front wheel when doing some spirited road riding in the Alps, but for over-landing as you say, an easy decision in favour of the XC.

Compared to my XT660z there is a lot of electronics on the 2018 XCx (at least) I doubt you’d need in adventure motorcycle zone (eg cruise control - which i love in europe). Weight wise and basic ergonomics feel pretty similar.

I nearly bought a 2015 but couldn’t get on with the wind protection at all. Only an issue at higher (motorway speed) but the latest (2018 model) is way better in that regard in my experience.

Engine wise I can’t say i’ve noticed much difference (both engines were/are peaches). They have lowered first gear on the 2018 model which is probably a nice to have if you’re doing some rougher stuff.

From memory it is a 19 litre tank - good for 180 miles/ 300 kms. Think this is the same for any version.

I run Bumot hard cases and a Givi top box (carried over from my last bike). Works well, but as and when the bike ventures out of Europe i’ll be looking at soft bags over these frames.



I’ll be interested to hear from those who have tested theirs more fully. It’s something I have in mind for mine in the future.
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Old 9 Sep 2019
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I've been the proud owner of two Tigers. I bought my first XC in 2011 when they were first available then, after 5 years and 26,000 miles, I traded that in for an XCx on which I covered another 24,000 miles. Early on I bought a pair of Metal Mule panniers which were later topped off with a Krauser top box. Both bikes had heated grips (Triumph on the XC and Oxford on the XCx) but otherwise remained relatively standard throughout my ownership. Some have complained about turbulence from the screen and that the seat is uncomfortable, however, I have suffered from neither of these issues... or perhaps I'm just more tolerant than others.

My original purchase in March 2011 of a brand new Tiger 800 XC was for a planned overland trip to China which never happened because life got in the way! I did, however, complete several tours around Europe and I took my first tentative steps into trail riding. For me, as a first-time trail bike, the Tiger is too big and too top-heavy as I found out nearly every time I ventured off-piste.



In 2013 and friend on a BMW R1200GS and I rode down through France and Andorra to the MotoGP in Barcelona. My friend was amazed at how the Tiger had no trouble keeping up with his larger BMW and that we were averaging similar fuel economy figures throughout the journey. I found that I could get an average of around 50 mpg with mixed riding (town/country/motorway). A year later, the Tiger took my girlfriend and me around Belgium and Northern France with a full load of luggage with no issues at all.

By the beginning of 2016, I was ready to move on to the XCx. Triumph said that, as well as the WP suspension, rider modes and cruise control, they had made many changes to the 800 cc engine. The most noticeable for me was the increased fuel economy as I was regularly getting over 200 miles from a tank of fuel. The changes to the suspension were like night and day with the WP units improving the ride in all conditions. Cruise control was a revelation as it gave me the chance to relax my right hand during long motorway runs but it also helped when trundling along at 30 mph through town or a village.



I loved the XCx more than the XC and I never thought I'd love a bike as much as I did the XC! In August of 2016, I rode up to Nordkapp on the northern tip of Norway: this was a mammoth 5,000-mile, two-week trip that encompassed 10 countries heading up the west coast of the Baltic Sea and back down the east coast. The bike performed incredibly well, averaging 55 mpg and taking every road in its stride.



The following year, the XCx and I completed a Four Corners Tour of the UK mainland, a 2,500 trip that visited Land's End, St. Davids in Wales, John o'Groats in Scotland and finishing in Lowestoft, Suffolk.

As well as my two Tigers, I have also ridden the original 19" wheel version (before it was called the XR) and a 2018 XCA with the taller screen and colour display. The only time I have not felt comfortable on one of the Tigers is when I have just come from riding another bike: I test rode the Honda CRF1000 Africa Twin Adventure Sports which has a wonderful engine and made the XCx seem a little bland and then I bought a CRF250 Rally which made the XCx feel so heavy! The fact is that it is neither bland nor heavy: the Triumph Tiger 800 is just a really good all-round bike.
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Old 14 Apr 2020
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Hello OB-1!
I read that you used the Tiger 800 with your partner. I am planning a trip and I am in a similar situation.
I would like to do offroad (half time more or less), With 2 people and traveling luggage, do you see it factibe with this bike?
thanks and sorry for bothering you!
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Old 14 Apr 2020
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swankeku View Post
Hello OB-1!
I read that you used the Tiger 800 with your partner. I am planning a trip and I am in a similar situation.
I would like to do offroad (half time more or less), With 2 people and traveling luggage, do you see it factibe with this bike?
thanks and sorry for bothering you!

I never rode two-up off-road, however, I have read many accounts of others on this site and ADVRider where people have. My suggestion would be to opt for the later Tiger with adjustable WP suspension so that you can tailor it to your requirements.
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  #6  
Old 28 Sep 2023
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I am going to change my bike to a Triumph Tiger 800. I can't run to a new 900, will have to be 2nd hand 800.
I am short at 5'7" so need a low seat. I am lead to believe its a quick and easy job to adjust to a low height. Does any one know how.
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Old 28 Sep 2023
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Originally Posted by PeteDuke View Post
I am going to change my bike to a Triumph Tiger 800. I can't run to a new 900, will have to be 2nd hand 800.
I am short at 5'7" so need a low seat. I am lead to believe its a quick and easy job to adjust to a low height. Does any one know how.
Remove the seat; adjust two straps on the bottom of the seat; refit the seat.

https://youtu.be/FRLXBGQgpLI?si=P6SqH4AYIzE4Rz2I

Takes less than a minute!
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