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Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else This is an opportunity to ask any question, and post any notice you wish that doesn't fit into one of the other sections.
Photo by Josephine Flohr, Elephant at Camp, Namibia

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  #16  
Old 19 Oct 2021
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I was always jaelous about those bike travellers who feel comfortable with the basic camping life.

Who did mostly popup a tent, use a cooker, did enjoy a campfire at night.



I did love to follow ride2explorer, his travel blog who is unfortunately offline since a while. But you can order his movie: https://www.journeyman.tv/film/7775

Cheaper you cant travel, if you cook yourself and dont spend money at hostels. And it will be too more a trip to yourself, if you regulary stay lonely.

I did often the same (just wildcamp over weeks) - but by 4x4 I can enjoy more comfort, from a fridge, a lot of more food options to carry, a hot shower till a bed who is storm proof.

Surfy
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  #17  
Old 19 Oct 2021
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclopathic View Post
Cooking meals while camping is overrated; I used to carry all that stuff until old wise traveler told me: cold food is still food. Since then I carry a couple cans meat, fish, etc as emergency maybe nuts and trail mix.
I agree for short trips—I carry just a Jetboil, a mug, spoon and knife, and then packet soup, oatcakes and instant coffee with dried milk and sweetners. Oh, and white pepper and chilli flakes.

But for a 15 month trip, your cold food and nuts suggestion might be a challenge.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclopathic View Post
You can get a decent tent ~4lbs. Add sleeping bag and pad should be under 7-8lbs total, ~3.5kg. I wouldn't wanna sleep anywhere without fully enclosed tent where scorpions or poisonous spiders could be a problem, hypothetically. And while at it take all your gear and riding boots in, just to be safe.
I don't disagree on weights, my 4-season two-man tent is 1.93kg and with footprint, sleeping mat, sleeping bag, minimal cooking stuff and food as above, it's probably realistically 6kg.
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  #18  
Old 19 Oct 2021
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Cullis View Post
I agree for short trips—I carry just a Jetboil, a mug, spoon and knife, and then packet soup, oatcakes and instant coffee with dried milk and sweetners. Oh, and white pepper and chilli flakes.

But for a 15 month trip, your cold food and nuts suggestion might be a challenge..
There isn't any compelling reason to cook to begin; buying food is inexpensive and time saving. I have carried my set on last 7 week trip through some desolate scenery and maybe used it 2-3 times. In 3rd world countries where you can get a bed, dinner and breakfast for $15, it's not worth the effort. I would probably carry cooking set on the trip to Siberia, old summer road, roads of BAM, but then I would rather spend an extra hour riding then cooking.. just saying. It's not like you will be in wilderness for more than 1-2 week a time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Cullis View Post
I don't disagree on weights, my 4-season two-man tent is 1.93kg and with footprint, sleeping mat, sleeping bag, minimal cooking stuff and food as above, it's probably realistically 6kg.
It depends on what you get; I think my setup on other bike is 7kg+. Heavier tent, cot, etc do add weight.

Last edited by cyclopathic; 20 Oct 2021 at 02:03.
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  #19  
Old 19 Oct 2021
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Cost is relevant to the country you are in. Australia is very expensive to eat out.
And accommodation is expensive.
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  #20  
Old 20 Oct 2021
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Originally Posted by Homers GSA View Post
Cost is relevant to the country you are in. Australia is very expensive to eat out.

And accommodation is expensive.
In US of A food is still cheap. Pandemic closed some restaurants/fast food places and you don't get discounts... still reasonably cheap for basic needs. But the era of $40-60 hotels is over, it's more like $99+ for budget accommodations and after paying $53 for campsite I ain't paying for that again.. stealth camping all the way especially in western states. Still $5-6 will buy you a shower at truck stop gas station when needed.

Would have to find out what the rest of the world like when I get to bike stored in asia.
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  #21  
Old 20 Oct 2021
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Hello

Quote:
Originally Posted by JensAckerman View Post
planning to do Alaska-Montreal-UK-Turkey-India-Thailand-Australia-S. America-Seattle on an Africa twin.
You have a lot of shippings for 15 months, container ship, RoRo or airplane?:
Montreal-UK
India-Thailand?
Thailand-Australia
Australia-S. America
S. America-N.America

You start and end in N-Amerika, do you live there?
Why going first to Alaska and then ship to Europe, you loose a lot of the summertime of the north, better just ship in the winter to the UK and start in spring there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JensAckerman View Post
I already have a cost estimate figured out covering everything from buying a 2018/19 Africa Twin to the Carnet and other costs (~45k for an estimated 15 months).
Dont' forget insurances and some money for emergencies.
CDP only for 12 month valid and then you need a second, but you only need it in the middle of your trip (Iran, Australia etc)

Quote:
Originally Posted by JensAckerman View Post
The one thing I can't get a good handle on is lodging. My goal is to camp as much as possible, but I understand that sometimes a campsite will be unavailable or I won't be able to find a good place to wild camp. I plan to do about an 80/20 on-road-off road route and was wondering if anyone had any info to help me better quantify how much I should set aside for lodging. As of now I am planning to camp 5 days a week and find some place to stay two days a week for an average hotel/hostel cost of $30 in addition to spending less time in more expensive countries.
Every RTW has a different price tag for a different Person.

Wild camping costs $0.
Campsites around the world from $5-$30, not all countries know the concept of camping.
In cities you will need a roof over your head and a save place to park the bike, in cheap countries $10-$30 for a single room and in expensive countries $20-$30 for a bunk bed in a backpacker, couch surfing maybe?

Some advice I don't get:

Small bikes and extreme light baggage are good in the sand and single tracks, but on a "normal RTW" you have to search for that.
All the known great routes are getting paved, 10 years ago there where a lot of construction sites on the Ruta 40, is there any gravel left?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JensAckerman View Post
2018/19 Africa Twin … 80/20 on-road-off road
Good choise of bike for a RTW in 15 months.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Cullis View Post
I would always advise carrying an inexpensive emergency storm shelter in case you are caught out, but a proper tent with sleeping, cooking gear and food adds considerably to the weight.
Emergency shelters a great for day hikers in the mountains but on a 15 month motorcycle trip one has raingear and warm cloth to survive in wind and rain over 150 km/h windspeed, like riding on a motocycle in the rain...


Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclopathic View Post
Cooking meals while camping is overrated; I used to carry all that stuff until old wise traveler told me: cold food is still food. Since then I carry a couple cans meat, fish, etc as emergency maybe nuts and trail mix.
There are a lot of places where there are no restaurants and some like a cup of coffee or tea and a warm meal.

If a good tent is 2kg or 3,5kg or even 5kg doesn't matter, take what works for you.
Weight of luggage is overrated, take what you need an learn to deal with it.

Don't forget, he goes on a 15 month RTW, not on a few days single track trip.

sushi
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  #22  
Old 20 Oct 2021
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sushi2831 View Post
Hello


You have a lot of shippings for 15 months, container ship, RoRo or airplane?:
Montreal-UK
India-Thailand?
Thailand-Australia
Australia-S. America
S. America-N.America

You start and end in N-Amerika, do you live there?
Why going first to Alaska and then ship to Europe, you loose a lot of the summertime of the north, better just ship in the winter to the UK and start in spring there.



Dont' forget insurances and some money for emergencies.
CDP only for 12 month valid and then you need a second, but you only need it in the middle of your trip (Iran, Australia etc)


Every RTW has a different price tag for a different Person.

Wild camping costs $0.
Campsites around the world from $5-$30, not all countries know the concept of camping.
In cities you will need a roof over your head and a save place to park the bike, in cheap countries $10-$30 for a single room and in expensive countries $20-$30 for a bunk bed in a backpacker, couch surfing maybe?

Some advice I don't get:

Small bikes and extreme light baggage are good in the sand and single tracks, but on a "normal RTW" you have to search for that.
All the known great routes are getting paved, 10 years ago there where a lot of construction sites on the Ruta 40, is there any gravel left?


Good choise of bike for a RTW in 15 months.


Emergency shelters a great for day hikers in the mountains but on a 15 month motorcycle trip one has raingear and warm cloth to survive in wind and rain over 150 km/h windspeed, like riding on a motocycle in the rain...



There are a lot of places where there are no restaurants and some like a cup of coffee or tea and a warm meal.

If a good tent is 2kg or 3,5kg or even 5kg doesn't matter, take what works for you.
Weight of luggage is overrated, take what you need an learn to deal with it.

Don't forget, he goes on a 15 month RTW, not on a few days single track trip.

sushi
Thanks for the response, going to go over some of the other posts in this thread.

In regards to the lighter bike, I was originally looking at something like a DR650 but ended up moving away from it because I dont want to put the work into doing all the aftermarket upgrades to get it ready. Also, I am pretty tall so I am valuing comfort over the size and weight savings. I will probably run into some issues when shipping in terms of cost, but I'd rather be comfortable on the road than save some cash.

For Australia I was going to start in the North and head to the east coast then go do the southern coastal highway and most likely shoot up through the center. Open to any advice to make the Australia trip as good as possible! Appreciate the cost estimates for hotels/fuel.

I left off Africa from the trip just because I feel that I would want to spend a lot of time there; I want to do this trip in 1.5-2 years and don't want to feel rushed. I already feel that I might not be able to see everything I want on my current itinerary! This will probably be a separate trip in the future.

In regards to the post above, I live in the US and am going to do a ride to Alaska as a check ride (grew up there so I want to visit some friends) and then will head east since I haven't see much of that part of the country. In terms of timing getting to Europe in the spring/summer, I will have to work that out. Itinerary is definitely fluid.

There is a lot of shipping involved for this trip, based on my research it seems that the best option is flying the bike if you can as there are less hidden costs and you can get there quicker. I am willing to change the mode of transport as I get closer to each decision point. I also am willing to cut out the shipping from India to Thailand, it's just it seems it is hard/expensive to travel through some of the countries in between.

In terms of cost, the 45k is the number I want to try and stick to but I will have plenty of left over for emergencies and higher than anticipated costs. I want to try for as small a budget as I am comfortable with as a personal challenge.

Thanks for all the advice!
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  #23  
Old 20 Oct 2021
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sushi2831 View Post
There are a lot of places where there are no restaurants and some like a cup of coffee or tea and a warm meal.

If a good tent is 2kg or 3,5kg or even 5kg doesn't matter, take what works for you.
Weight of luggage is overrated, take what you need an learn to deal with it.

Don't forget, he goes on a 15 month RTW, not on a few days single track trip.

sushi
.. speaking of coffee and tea you can get an inexpensive €.5-2 cup of expresso/cappuchino in europe, turkish/greek coffee I greece and free tea at any purchase at any gas station in turkey, or any food purchase in muslim countries. There's no reason to carry something half world you won't need until you get to australia.. can be purchased there. As for time 7 days, 7 weeks, 7 month it's all the same if you don't use something for weeks you don't need it, IMO. And weight is relevant for the state of your bike and when you need to pick it up. There were times in central asia when I started day by looking for welder, 4 days in a row sometimes.

@OP look into guesthouses iOverlander has some info and some listed in booking.com and in google; they're common in eastern europe and asia.. other parts of the world too. Talk to locals when you are going through village and see people selling food (tomatoes, potatoes, etc) they can be talked into cooking it for you. When my frame cracked and local "master" and I worked on the bike for a couple days I stayed in his house and he fed me.. all together was pretty cheap. And places selling food in remote villages where there's no guesthouses can let you stay overnight when customers gone; at least you would have roof over your head. You might end up listening to donkeys all night but that's another story. Make sure your Google translate works well; if you don't have service prepare some key phrases in advance good luck.
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  #24  
Old 21 Oct 2021
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclopathic View Post
.. weight is relevant for the state of your bike and when you need to pick it up. There were times in central asia when I started day by looking for welder, 4 days in a row sometimes.
Hello

I might be lost in translation, but usually motorbikes are built for two persons, so taking a cooker and desent tent will not crack the frame.

If you can't lift the bike because of the cooker and tent, take it off and lift the bike.
Piece of advice, don't drop the bike to often.

But in the end, everybody has to find their own way of traveling.

sushi
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  #25  
Old 21 Oct 2021
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sushi2831 View Post
Hello

I might be lost in translation, but usually motorbikes are built for two persons, so taking a cooker and desent tent will not crack the frame.

If you can't lift the bike because of the cooker and tent, take it off and lift the bike.
Piece of advice, don't drop the bike to often.

But in the end, everybody has to find their own way of traveling.

sushi
Agree it's likely lost in translation; perhaps we have different adventure in mind?

Traveling alone along Silk road I had seen roads which haven't been paved since 1976 or I was told so by locals. And you know it's gonna be good when cars leave the road and run through the fields The shop which was welding my bike told me they had a german with honda 2 week prior replacing rear shock with one from Lada; I'd love to see that.

As for unloading bike it depends on how it's gone down and where; and things are different at 12-14000' altitude much harder when you are out of oxygen. And it's unrealistic to get something out of if bike is laying down on it. As for not dropping bike good advice LoL.. especially in mud, deep sand, loose rock, fech-fech or in the middle of river x-ings, just because a bridge got washed out.
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  #26  
Old 22 Oct 2021
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclopathic View Post
Agree it's likely lost in translation; perhaps we have different adventure in mind?

in the middle of river x-ings, just because a bridge got washed out.
Hello

Piece of advice, for difficulte rivercrossings, take of the baggague and walk it over.

I don't know what you understand of an adventure RTW with a motorbike?

As I said before:
"Small bikes and extreme light baggage are good in the sand and single tracks, but on a "normal RTW" you have to search for that.
All the known great routes are getting paved, 10 years ago there where a lot of construction sites on the Ruta 40, is there any gravel left?"


I did only a "normal RTW", nothing extreme but still an aventure to me:
http://www.youtube.com/user/MrXt660ztenere
Exept a day trip in the sand in Archers N.P., all with cooker and tent. (Videos 2011-2013)


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  #27  
Old 22 Dec 2022
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Hey I was just doing research the other day on getting from Thailand to India (crossing Myanmar). The guys from the youtube channel "North and Left a Bit" used a guide service osugamyanmartravel.com. It was like $400 for 5 days as long as you go in a group and hotel is included. Seems like it could be cheaper and less hassle than air freight from India to Thailand (more fun too).
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  #28  
Old 25 Dec 2022
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Pretty sure Myanmar borders are closed for travelers. That would be big news if something had changed on that regard, but I highly doubt it.
So as things currently stand: It's not happening.
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  #29  
Old 27 Dec 2022
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Quote:
Originally Posted by molflig View Post
Hey I was just doing research the other day on getting from Thailand to India (crossing Myanmar). The guys from the youtube channel "North and Left a Bit" used a guide service osugamyanmartravel.com. It was like $400 for 5 days as long as you go in a group and hotel is included. Seems like it could be cheaper and less hassle than air freight from India to Thailand (more fun too).
Their trip was done in 2018.....a lot has changed since then! Myanmar borders are closed
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  #30  
Old 27 Dec 2022
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My thoughts on the original enquiry, which was about lodging I believe.
Lodging is different throughout the world, I’m sure you know:
It’s possible to find lots of free camping in the US - we struggled to find hotels, down the east side, lately below $90.
We stayed in a brand new 4* hotel in Albania for £20, including dinner - the next night we paid more to stay on a Dutch owned campsite.
Etc etc etc…..

I think you will find your own rhythm and travelling style after a few months.
Personally I don’t breakdown and calculate finances because there’s too many variables.

My advice is too just go with the flow - peaks and troughs, whether that’s financial, mental or physical.
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