Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > All Miscellaneous questions > Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else
Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else This is an opportunity to ask any question, and post any notice you wish that doesn't fit into one of the other sections.
Photo by Mark Newton, Mexican camping

I haven't been everywhere...
but it's on my list!


Photo by Mark Newton,
Camping in the Mexican desert



Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12 Jan 2011
Endurodude's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Middle England, UK
Posts: 457
Daily distance?

I'm starting to plan my European trip for the summer. I will be away 2 to 2 1/2 weeks, going from Blighty to the south of France (via le tour!), then up through the Alps, Zurich, Bruges and then back to England.

I'm fairly new to distance motorbike travel, and am planning between 200-270 miles per day, with some rest days in Cannes, Zurich and Bruges. Is this too much per day? I keep reading that people enjoy a slower ride, taking longer; I like this idea, but am anxious that the trip will end up costing more than I can afford (I'm plannig a bigger trip next year, and don't want to spend ages paying off the credit card!).

Any help / suggestions from those with more experience would be gratefully welcome
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12 Jan 2011
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 994
That should be plenty. Are you planning on tarmac or dirt, will you be riding constantly or looking around a bit? What size bike?
My longest days were 800 or 1000 miles but I was getting off the bike around midnight which was a bad plan in terms of finding somewhere suitable to sleep.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12 Jan 2011
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 762
if you are away for a fixed period then the slower you go the cheaper it will be, as you'll spend less on fuel.

if you're not used to riding over the Alps then 200/270 miles might be pushing it. There's the usual thing of weather, and you may well get stuck for a few hours behind a cycle race. But, also, you might just knacker yourself out with all those bends, or you might want to keep stopping and take in the vista.

I think an idea of daily mileage is not very useful. just go to the places you want to go to, and speed up/slow down if necessary, who cares if it's 60 miles or 300. You can always take a b-line for a motorway if you need to get back in a hurry.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12 Jan 2011
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bristol, UK
Posts: 336
Really depends on you. My answer is don't worry about specific distances.

Do what you feel is right and just find accomodation at then end of the day.

My first europe tour I got really hung up on distance in the planning. In the end Just did what felt right every day I had a rough Idea of what I wanted to do every day and was generally ok.

My experince was 200 - 300 miles were good for Normal roads

Could do 400 plus on Motorway/ Dual Carraigway.

Just enjoy yourself
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12 Jan 2011
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 994
D'oh! just realised my longest days were 800-1000km, italian speedo!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12 Jan 2011
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 762
ok, so a little weirdy thing...

I've done barcelona to london on the ZX6 a few times. And barcelona/santander to tarifa a few times on various 'adventure' bikes.

best seat for long distance ? the ZX6, no question about it. 13 hours in the seat and I feel fine.

One of the things I took a little convincing of when switching to long distance cycling (up to 150 miles in a sitting), was the Brooks saddle. this is a 2 ml thick leather panel stretched over some rails. conventional thinking (and marketing) points to you something soft and squidgey. but no, fellow long distancers, this is the wrong path. the reason is to do with your 'sit bones', and they need to sit on something firm to work properly and not give you gip.

so, if I'm on a long distance trip with very long days in the saddle I take the ZX6 with it's 1" padded seat. Rather than the DL1000 with it's 4" padding. 6 hours has me shifting around on the DL.

while motorbikers tend to reach for a gel seat or a sheep skin, cyclists on the long haul go for no padding at all and invest in a Brooks. I'm good on my Brooks for 10 or so hours, and my squidgey seat far far less.

weird, but true.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12 Jan 2011
Big Yellow Tractor's Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: England
Posts: 649
Your mileages seem about right (I've done a few 180 mile days on a trail-bike, mostly off-road, without too much trouble) but don't get too hung up on a timetable. As others have said; it could end up ruining your trip. If you like a town or area then hang around for a bit. If you don't get to some places on your list then don't worry; that's a good excuse for another trip.

BYT
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 13 Jan 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne UK
Posts: 252
Hi

On my little DL650 wee strom with gel insert and sheepskin I can easily cover 500 miles a day.... but some days Im happy to do 200...

My first few trips to Europe involved moving to my next campsite everyday, now I tend to plan a few days in one place.. its nice to be able to have a day off the bike and chill or walk around and do some exploring

Cheers
Geordie
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 13 Jan 2011
Endurodude's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Middle England, UK
Posts: 457
All excellent advice! I'm on a F800GS, and will be doing a variety of roads (no real off road this time). I'll be motorway-ing it down to the South of France, and then B-roads up again.

I like the idea of a leisurely juant, but I'm anxious that I should plan accomodation in advance. Maybe it's my lack of experience, but I'd feel more comfortable having things vaguely organised in advance! I am planning to camp for part of the journey, so maybe that could add some flexibility.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 13 Jan 2011
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bristol, UK
Posts: 336
Quote:
Originally Posted by Endurodude View Post
All excellent advice! I'm on a F800GS, and will be doing a variety of roads (no real off road this time). I'll be motorway-ing it down to the South of France, and then B-roads up again.

I like the idea of a leisurely juant, but I'm anxious that I should plan accomodation in advance. Maybe it's my lack of experience, but I'd feel more comfortable having things vaguely organised in advance! I am planning to camp for part of the journey, so maybe that could add some flexibility.
My experince was that apart from the major Backpacker cities you don't really need to book in advance. You may need to go to a couple of Hotel/ B&Bs/Guesthouses before you find a bed. but if your taking camping gear there is almost always a free pitch some where.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 13 Jan 2011
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 994
Quote:
Originally Posted by Endurodude View Post
I like the idea of a leisurely juant, but I'm anxious that I should plan accomodation in advance. Maybe it's my lack of experience, but I'd feel more comfortable having things vaguely organised in advance! I am planning to camp for part of the journey, so maybe that could add some flexibility.
I found that having somewhere booked added to the pressure by having to be somewhere at a certain time and took away some of the sense of freedom that just being on the road gives. Admittedly I did end up sleeping in some wierd places
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 13 Jan 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Moscow
Posts: 1,117
Is the journey to the target area part of the holiday?

I used to regularly take a bike from London to holidays in the South of France. The 700 mile ride there was just to get there and completed in a day. Once there, touring/sightseeing distances varied between 30 and 300 miles a day dependant on terrain, views, mood, weather, etc.

For pure distance journeys I find 800 miles a day is about the max unless riding through the dark. I regularly ride London/Moscow. The 1900 miles takes 2.5 days including hotel night stops and the protracted border nonsence. I dont think it could be squeezed into much less time (i.e. more daily miles).

Off roading is a completely different matter.
In one very long day on the BAM we managed the grand total of about 5 miles - but it was pure bog and a deep river which we had to part fill with rocks to make a ford shallow enough to push the bikes through!

For holiday touring/sightseeing my advice would be not to set yourself too tight a schedule. It is far better and more satisfying to have the flexibility to spend longer in unexpectedly interesting areas and adding loops or detours. Having to cut things out leaves a feeling of disapointment that mars the overall effect.
Enjoy.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 13 Jan 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne UK
Posts: 252
I dont book campsites (I nearly always camp). I have a tomtom with the "Archies campsite of europe" loaded as my POI.

That way Im not racing to the next stop just to make a booking in time, the only real constraits on my trips is I always visit a couple of International rallys so have to be there roughly on time.

If your going to use motorways in France then be prepared for toll roads and deep pockets !

Best of Luck

Geordie
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 13 Jan 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,598
Quote:
Originally Posted by Endurodude View Post
All excellent advice! I'm on a F800GS, and will be doing a variety of roads (no real off road this time). I'll be motorway-ing it down to the South of France, and then B-roads up again.

I like the idea of a leisurely juant, but I'm anxious that I should plan accomodation in advance. Maybe it's my lack of experience, but I'd feel more comfortable having things vaguely organised in advance! I am planning to camp for part of the journey, so maybe that could add some flexibility.
The tolls on the peages can really mount up. I suggest you get best value by 'bivouacing' overnight using the rest areas. Unless your route is planned for specific destinations landing at dieppe and slicing to the west of Paris to pick up the A20 (mostly free) south past Limoges. at about junction 53 take a left to Millau from there it is free to Montpellier. Cannes is very expensive and crowded.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 13 Jan 2011
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 994
Another reason to love Italy, bikes can go anywhere, you just go round the end of the barriers! Across parks, down steps with cops watching, not a problem at all!
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Iveco Daily 4x4 Sam Rutherford Heavy Overland Vehicle Tech 105 19 Nov 2009 19:14
Iveco Daily 4x4 K Reg Richard Dunn Overland Vehicles and Equipment for Sale / Wanted 1 6 Jun 2009 21:46
New Iveco Daily 4x4 Josh R Equipping the Overland Vehicle 1 9 Nov 2007 16:00
RTW daily expenses ahkeong_m Route Planning 9 22 Nov 2006 03:58
Daily distance in India usl Route Planning 4 5 Sep 2003 11:29

 
 

Announcements

Thinking about traveling? Not sure about the whole thing? Watch the HU Achievable Dream Video Trailers and then get ALL the information you need to get inspired and learn how to travel anywhere in the world!

Have YOU ever wondered who has ridden around the world? We did too - and now here's the list of Circumnavigators!
Check it out now
, and add your information if we didn't find you.

Next HU Eventscalendar

HU Event and other updates on the HUBB Forum "Traveller's Advisories" thread.
ALL Dates subject to change.

2024:

2025:

  • Queensland is back! Date TBC - May?

Add yourself to the Updates List for each event!

Questions about an event? Ask here

HUBBUK: info

See all event details

 
World's most listened to Adventure Motorbike Show!
Check the RAW segments; Grant, your HU host is on every month!
Episodes below to listen to while you, err, pretend to do something or other...

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

"Ultimate global guide for red-blooded bikers planning overseas exploration. Covers choice & preparation of best bike, shipping overseas, baggage design, riding techniques, travel health, visas, documentation, safety and useful addresses." Recommended. (Grant)



Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance.

Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance™ combines into a single integrated program the best evacuation and rescue with the premier travel insurance coverages designed for adventurers.

Led by special operations veterans, Stanford Medicine affiliated physicians, paramedics and other travel experts, Ripcord is perfect for adventure seekers, climbers, skiers, sports enthusiasts, hunters, international travelers, humanitarian efforts, expeditions and more.

Ripcord travel protection is now available for ALL nationalities, and travel is covered on motorcycles of all sizes!


 

What others say about HU...

"This site is the BIBLE for international bike travelers." Greg, Australia

"Thank you! The web site, The travels, The insight, The inspiration, Everything, just thanks." Colin, UK

"My friend and I are planning a trip from Singapore to England... We found (the HU) site invaluable as an aid to planning and have based a lot of our purchases (bikes, riding gear, etc.) on what we have learned from this site." Phil, Australia

"I for one always had an adventurous spirit, but you and Susan lit the fire for my trip and I'll be forever grateful for what you two do to inspire others to just do it." Brent, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the (video) series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring!" Jennifer, Canada

"Your worldwide organisation and events are the Go To places to for all serious touring and aspiring touring bikers." Trevor, South Africa

"This is the answer to all my questions." Haydn, Australia

"Keep going the excellent work you are doing for Horizons Unlimited - I love it!" Thomas, Germany

Lots more comments here!



Five books by Graham Field!

Diaries of a compulsive traveller
by Graham Field
Book, eBook, Audiobook

"A compelling, honest, inspiring and entertaining writing style with a built-in feel-good factor" Get them NOW from the authors' website and Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, Amazon.co.uk.



Back Road Map Books and Backroad GPS Maps for all of Canada - a must have!

New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80G/S.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events all over the world with the help of volunteers; we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, or ask questions on the HUBB. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:10.