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Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else This is an opportunity to ask any question, and post any notice you wish that doesn't fit into one of the other sections.
Photo by Josephine Flohr, Elephant at Camp, Namibia

I haven't been everywhere...
but it's on my list!


Photo by Josephine Flohr,
Elephant at Camp, Namibia



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  • 1 Post By markharf
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  #1  
Old 17 Mar 2019
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Angry 1st tire change on my 2017 KLR - HELP!

I am attempting to change my tires for the first time on my KLR and I am not having fun. I bought all the right tools: the bead buddy, long tire irons and the best baby powder I could find. I have been watching YouTube videos and boy does it look easy when someone else does it. I had no issue getting the OEM tire off, but I am not able to get this new Kenda 5.10-17 17P on even if my life depended on it. Take a look at the photos and maybe someone can shed some life on what I may be overlooking besides experience.

Thanks,

Cliff

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/c33rh428x...5r5-CToka?dl=0
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1st tire change on my 2017 KLR - HELP!-img_0584.jpg  

1st tire change on my 2017 KLR - HELP!-img_0586.jpg  

1st tire change on my 2017 KLR - HELP!-img_0583.jpg  

1st tire change on my 2017 KLR - HELP!-img_0587.jpg  

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  #2  
Old 17 Mar 2019
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I can't tell from your photos whether both edges/beads on the opposite side from where you haven't gotten the tire onto the rim--the opposite side of the circle from where you're working--are squeezed together and into the "dished" center part of the rim. That's what gives you the extra clearance to pop that last bit of bead over the rim and into place.

If the section of bead you've already got in place is out where it eventually will belong, you'll have a struggle, so squeeze it into the center. It's actually fairly easy once you get everything lined up--with practice, people-who-are-not-me can do it barehanded.

If the above is inapplicable, then just jam your third [sic] tire iron halfway along the section you're struggling with and lever hard. The bead will pop right into place--I promise.

Don't know if that's helpful or not.

Mark
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  #3  
Old 17 Mar 2019
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Thanks, Mark. I really appreciate your help. Maybe these photos will help. You can see from the image how much further the tire will need to stretch to get over the rim and I have another image showing the other side that has an approx. 1/2' gap between the tire and the rim. The way it is now, it is impossible to get the tire over the rim even if I put all my weight on the lever. Does this show you anything more that may help?

Thanks

Cliff
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  #4  
Old 17 Mar 2019
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You’re not that far away, it’s just a case of keeping on nibbling away at the edges. For me though it doesn’t look like you’ve got enough lube on the tyre. That size tyre on a 17” rim is one of the harder ones to do and lube, both in the area you’re levering and on the bits that need to slide into the well, makes it go a lot easier.

When you get this one done try a front wheel next. 21” rims and narrow tyres are a lot easier. Some tyre types / rim combinations you can almost do with your fingers
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Old 17 Mar 2019
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I think Mark is correct. The bead of the tyre needs to be pushed down into the spoke well of the rim to allow enough slack where you're levering. In your first pic it looks like the tyre is up on the rim all the way round. Kneel on it to push the bead down into the "gully" while you lever the opposite side on.
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Old 17 Mar 2019
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Totally agree with the above comments, it's all about lube - thin (slippery, not sticky) dish washing liquid 10% to water, and not WD-40 - AND most importantly, getting the bead all the way into the valley on the opposite side, and keeping it there. Kneel on the tire to comppress it and help it get and stay in the valley, and reach across and work the levers a VERY small amount at a time, two inch "bites" max. IMPORTANT TIP: Be SURE to END at the valve stem, or the valve stem will prevent the bead from sitting all the way in and you'll struggle.

Note the levers you are using are MUCH more than you need, it's really easy to destroy the tire and gouge the rim with them, so go easy with the pressure. I use 6" or 8" levers only, ever. If it's too hard, the bead isn't all the way in the valley, ALL the way round to where the tire is still not "on".

Forget the youtube videos, there's way too much nonsense (and yes I'm being polite about much of it, although there are some good tips there) if you want to know how to do a tire change properly, ALL the secrets from my over 50 years of doing them, and teaching it at many events, go to http://vimeo.com/horizonsunlimited

Hope that helps!
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Old 17 Mar 2019
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Thank you, everyone. I took it off and tried again with lots of lube and all your suggestions and it is done. I really appreciate the advice and I will watch your video and agree about YouTube Grant. I saw things that even a novice like me had me scratching my head at. Someone using cable ties and another one using duct tape. Just an FYI Grant. I heard about this site and you on Adventure Rider Radio and to give you an idea of my level of insanity and determination. I have made it through all the back catalog of RAW and ADV Radio in 3 weeks and loved hearing your input. I'll also be coming to the event in May at Rice Lake and just making sure I can get the Thursday and Friday off work. Someone can put a video on for the students those days.

Final Question to prove I am a novice, just in case there was any doubt. My manual says what the suggested tire pressure is. Does this apply to only the OEM tires or any tires on the bike?
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  #8  
Old 18 Mar 2019
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cliffspicer View Post
Does this apply to only the OEM tires or any tires on the bike?
Sounds like you got the tire thing figured out for the first tire change. This is a critical skill to have as a moto traveler. Make sure to be careful about not pinching the tube between the rim and the tire with the tire iron. You can put a hole in a new tube by pinching it.

Pressure, follow recommended pressures for all tires on your KLR.

Motion pro has excellent tire spoons, properly shaped, plus their bead breaking tool is the best one around. The bead breaking tool has the #2 and #3 tire spoon on the handle, so you need only one good Motion Pro spoon to start the tire removal.

Change your own tires at home all the time so you can do it on the road without snags, like pinching the tube. Important skill to have when there is no cell service, you are on a road or dirt track with no one coming for hours, and it's.....
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  #9  
Old 18 Mar 2019
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cliffspicer View Post
Thank you, everyone. I took it off and tried again with lots of lube and all your suggestions and it is done. I really appreciate the advice and I will watch your video and agree about YouTube Grant. I saw things that even a novice like me had me scratching my head at. Someone using cable ties and another one using duct tape. Just an FYI Grant. I heard about this site and you on Adventure Rider Radio and to give you an idea of my level of insanity and determination. I have made it through all the back catalog of RAW and ADV Radio in 3 weeks and loved hearing your input. I'll also be coming to the event in May at Rice Lake and just making sure I can get the Thursday and Friday off work. Someone can put a video on for the students those days.

Final Question to prove I am a novice, just in case there was any doubt. My manual says what the suggested tire pressure is. Does this apply to only the OEM tires or any tires on the bike?
Great to see you got it done!
And to see you heard about it all on ARR, nice! And yes you're insane to go through all that in 3 weeks, but in a good way I'm impressed!

For pressure, check the TIRE manufacturers recommendations for your bike, especially when changing sizes or type of tire. For standard tires, the factory has determined the correct pressures, but they haven't tested every tire on the market, and two years later there's a new tire with a different construction requiring different pressures, and while another tire may have the same recommendation as the factory OEM tires, often they do not.

Enjoy the Ontario event, you'll learn a lot! We won't be there, but there's plenty of people to meet and learn from.
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  #10  
Old 18 Mar 2019
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grant Johnson View Post
Totally agree with the above comments, it's all about lube - thin (slippery, not sticky) dish washing liquid 10% to water, and not WD-40 - AND most importantly, getting the bead all the way into the valley on the opposite side, and keeping it there. Kneel on the tire to comppress it and help it get and stay in the valley, and reach across and work the levers a VERY small amount at a time, two inch "bites" max. IMPORTANT TIP: Be SURE to END at the valve stem, or the valve stem will prevent the bead from sitting all the way in and you'll struggle.

Note the levers you are using are MUCH more than you need, it's really easy to destroy the tire and gouge the rim with them, so go easy with the pressure. I use 6" or 8" levers only, ever. If it's too hard, the bead isn't all the way in the valley, ALL the way round to where the tire is still not "on".

Forget the youtube videos, there's way too much nonsense (and yes I'm being polite abut much of it, although there are some good tips there) if you want to know how to do a tire change properly, ALL the secrets from my over 50 years of doing them, and teaching it at many events, go to http://vimeo.com/horizonsunlimited

Hope that helps!
I was glad to read your reply and see that I'm doing everything right, until you told not to use WD40... Why wouldn't you ? I tend to use it for anything, that might be a tad too much, but i promise, i don't put any in my cereals in the morning ! Anyway, it does the trick as for lubricating the tire when I change them, so what's the downside I'm not seeing here ?
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  #11  
Old 18 Mar 2019
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WD-40 is first a water dispersant. Although used and touted as a lubricant, it's a crappy lubricant - but it does contain oils and volatile solvents - none of which is recommended for rubber products, and especially tires!
I recommend just about any other lube, a favourite of mine is Tri-Flo, which works great, lasts MUCH longer than WD-40, and comes in a liquid, non-aerosol form, which is perfect for travelling. ONE small bottle of this lasted me round the world, 2 years on the road.

Dish soap as I mentioned can be obtained anywhere for free, and a 35mm film can full will do 2-3 tires.
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