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TRAVEL Hints and Tips Post your TIPS to travellers - all the interesting little tidbits you learned on the road about packing, where to get stuff, and how to cope with problems. Please make sure the subject describes the tip clearly!
Photo by Josephine Flohr, Elephant at Camp, Namibia

I haven't been everywhere...
but it's on my list!


Photo by Josephine Flohr,
Elephant at Camp, Namibia



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  #1  
Old 23 Jul 2018
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Riding slow = traveling fast (turtle vs rabbit)

Munching massive lengths of road, day after day, week after week, does not have to be very difficult if you are tactical about it. I thought I would share my experience, and also hope you would share yours.

Start early:
Start as early as possible so you can arrive as early as possible. The more time you have at your end destination for the day, the more time you have to enjoy life out of the saddle and recharge.

If you stay at a place where they serve breakfast, be there when it opens. Make sure you have checked out and that the bike is packed, fueled, serviced and ready to go.

Don't order anything from the menue that takes time to prepare. At this point, all you want to do is stuff your face and jump on the bike.

In places where they serve breakfast late, I make my own.

Ride slow
It seems counter intuitive to get somewhere fast by riding slow, but is one of the most important things you can do to really increase your pace over time. If you ride fast you will become far more fatigued. Not onli will you have to combat more wind, noise and vibrations, or muscle the bike in bends, but you will also spend far more energy being alert. Last of all, you will be able to recharge less from enjoing the scenery as all your focus is on the road and trafic.

The added fatigue will over time lead you to taking more breaks, longer breaks and/or ending the day earlier. Over time the added speed will put you behind.

In addition to the fatigue, you will consume more fuel - requiring additional forced fuel stops... taking more time. Although taking breaks is an effective means to recharge, fuel stops is not very effective in this regard.

Conscider that on a 1000 km ride, you save maybe an hour riding at 140 kms/h rather than at 120... if you did not have to refuel or take any breaks.

A last thing to conscider is that by by reducing your speed, you will also reduce the strain on the bike and reduce risk of accidents... in other words, fewer time consuming break downs and needed service.

Think about what the reduced speed can do to reduce the risk of riding into, or onto, something that will cause a tyre to blow out or a wipe out. Your reaction distance at 80 kms/h is rougly 30 meters with a total stopping distance of roughly 70 meters. At 100 kms/h the reaction distance is approximately 42 meters with a total stopping distance close to 100 meters. If you ride long enough, it is inevitable. Your goal here is to reduce the frequency and the severity of calamities.

Stop often, but short
Stopping is another thing that sounds counter intuitive when you are in a hurry, but it is extremely effective. Fatigueness is something that creeps up on you. Once it has taken hold, it takes an exponential ammount of rest to reset. It requires far less rest to keep fatigueness away by resting up befor it sets in than to recharge after it has. If you take frequent short stops, you can travel som serious distances, day after day.

My routine is that I start looking for a place to stop after an hours worth of riding. I try to stop every 60-90 minutes, and closer to 60 than 90. When I stop, I get off the bike and shut it off. I allways take off the helmet and air out my riding gear. I always drink some water and usually eat a small snack (a handful of trail mix, etc) or have half a smoke. I get on the bike again as quickly as possible - usually never having stopped more than 3-7 minutes.

Every 3-4 hours I try to take a "longer" stop, but never more than 15 minutes. I try to combine this with fuel stops and lunch.

Keeping your break times short is very important.Longer breaks will mean that you arrive at your destination later, eating into your "super charging" time. You want as much time at your end destination for the day as possible, but without arriving fatigued.

Don't eat at restarants or cafes
Although sitting at a table and being served a great meal really halps you to recharge, waiting for service and the check eats up a lot of time... even at drive throughs. I usually travel with a packed lunch, a thermos and plenty of water. I often carry bread and a jar of peanut butter and a jar of jelly, and maybe some cheeze so I don't have to stop to shop. Shopping in riding gear is very unpleasant.

When I close up on lunch time, I start looking for a pitoresque place in the "wild"... a place to stop on the road where I can lie down and enjoy the scenery. I try to avoid stopping in urbanized areas or near businesses where there allways seem to be well intended and interested people that want to talk to me, eating into, or adding onto, my resting time.

I always try to have my dinner at the end of my day... out of my riding gear with peace of mind, knowing I have no place else I ought to be.

Prepare for the next day's ride as soon as you arrive
I find that having a long stretch of uninterupted rest and leasure time is most effective in terms of resting up. This means that as soon as I have checked in to my room or camp ground, I go straight to work. I fuel and service my bike, I wash my clothes, and plug in everything that needs charging. Then I have the rest of the day off, to do whatever I like - with no duties on my mind.

The only exception to the above is if I arrive close to the end of dinner service... then I will have my dinner first.

Have a mid-leg contingency for where to sleep
In my itineraries I usually put in an alternative place to sleep, midway on every leg. Should the riding go smoother than anticipated, then I have the option to push to the next place to sleep. If it goes slower than expected - i.e. I had a break down, I had to wait for a ferry, there was a place I just had to stop to explore, there was a detour, the riding conditions made for a slower ride than anticipated... or whatever... then I have the option to stop before I over excert myself. I haven often resorted to both options.

Reduce stops on shorter legs
On shorter legs, for me legs with three hours or less of effective riding time, I ride it all in one go - only stopping if nature calls. I still get off to an early as possible start. My objective is allways the same, get to where I am going as early as possible so to gain the longest rest time possible.

Find your 60-80%
If you for instance find that your maximum riding capacity under a specific riding condition is 1000 kms in 12 hours, then you will not be able to do this several days in a row. You will likely on your second or third day find that you can only do 60% of this, and that each day thereafter will not get any easier - likley more and more difficult, effectively grinding you to a hault. Once the fatigue has set in, it requires complete days off to recharge, sometimes several in a row.

If you instead force yourself to limit yourself to 60-80% of max, there is a high chance that you can carry on riding at this level day after day with only a complete rest day every fifth to seventh day...

When planning an itinerary it is important to understand your limits with your specific setup and plan accordingly. Me for instance, riding mostly highway speeds at 120-130 kms/hour, on a one cylinder vibrating thumper with a very limited fairing and no throttle return stopper (i.e. f650gs dakar)... puts me at beyond max at 1250 kms in 16 hours, two days in a row... but will leave me screaming in pain the last few hours of riding. I have come to conclude that my max is 12 hours on the road including stops when riding at comfortable speeds. This puts my 60% at 7 hours, and my 80% closer to ten. With effective avarage riding speeds below 70 kms/h, seven hours on the road seems quite easy. But I have no greater problems doing 10 hours riding on the highway.

My limit is therefor not so much how far or long I am able to ride, but more my goal to arrive where I am going before dinner time. If I set off at 08:00, I plan to arrive so that I am able to prepare for the following day and still make dinner before 19:00.


Quit before it gets dark
Riding at night is far more straneous than riding during during the day. The risk of putting you or your bike into harm's way - adding to your time, is also much greater. A disporoportinotae ammount or damage to the wheels and tyres has happens to me in poor lighting conditions while being exhausted at the same time - i.e. by riding too fast into some damn pot hole.

While riding at night may seem to get you where you are going faster, far more than is gained will surely be lost if you ruin a rim. If you ride at night long enough, something is bound to go sideways at some point. In any case, you need to rest to be able to continue indefinately. Get to where you are going early, and rest hard and long!

Conscider rush traffic
Riding in traffic is not only slow, but also tiresome. If the start of my leg is in a heavily urbanized area with traffic congestion, I get an extra early start - beating the worst of it... not only saving time, but also conserving energy.

Take some time off
If traveling for more than a week, then the above approach will inevitably lead to fatigue. You will not only find that your rests becomes less and less efficient over time, but you will also experience that the mundaneness of riding day after day will also take its toll.

I need to put in some riding free days every now and then to recharge fully. This could be to go to the beach, dip in a pool, go sightseeing, do some necessary errands, hiking, go to a concert, doing a through bike service, or what not - anything but riding or staying at a hotel or camp site.

I find that riding for four days straight and then take the fifth day off, or riding for five days straight and then take two days off, is ideal. I allways try to time these days off with destinations that have some really nice attractions

Some additional tips

Wear ear plugs
Noice fatigue has significant effects on your ability to carry on day after day, but it is entirely avoidable...

Don't get a buzz on the night before riding
I loooove and whisky, but restrain myself if I am to ride the following day.

Get a good nights sleep
I've become addicted to sleeping with my ear plugs even at home... Wheras I at home can get by with 5-6 hours a sleep on average, if I am to ride day after day, I need 8 hours.
Noice fatigue will lead you to put the bike up on its stand earlier and earlier every day.

Have comfortable bike and riding gear
If you are uncomfrtable on the bike, you will ofcourse get tired. A comfortable seat, farings that will protect you from the elements, a helmet without pressure points, a throttle return stopper, clothes that be adjusted to compensate for changes in riding climate, clothes without seams that cause chafing etc, etc, etc... are all very important investments.

Psyllum Husks!!!!!
There is one thing that no one likes to talk about - taking shits! Psyllum husks is a food supplement that can be purchased at pharmises and health food stores. It is a fiber that also have lubricating qualities. It will ensure perfect bowel movements. When you take this supplement you will be able to pass a turd allmost as quickly as taking a piss - with nothing left on the toilet paper. It also reduces bloating, constipation and gas. In the groups I have been riding with, everyone has become "adicted" to this stuff. The only draw back is that when you have to go, you really have to go!

It is not the time saver here that is the essence here, but a clean bung hole. (although I must admit I was very greatful for the time saver component one time I had to take a crap on a road with mine fields on both sides and nowhere to hide). If riding in a group where several people enjoys taking 30 minute shits, then this will take up a ton of time - especially if one has to wait turns at the same stall or if they are out of sync.

If you need tons of toilet paper to clean your bum, your ass will get sore. If it is not prisitne, your ass will also get sore - it's a catch 22 if you don't have lots of fiber in your diet. Psyllum husks is the cure.

Divide larger groups into likeminded buddy pairs
If riding in larger groups, there is always someone that you need to wait for. Either there is someone that is out of sync on bathroom breaks or need for refuelling, or there is someone that gets lost behind in traffic, has a break down or rides slow, etc, etc.

Having a riding buddy can make you more efficient, i.e. by having someone watch over your stuff while you go to pay for gas or check accomodation. Having many buddies on the other hand will slow you down.

My tip is to divide into groups of 2-3 bikes and pair up according to riding style and time management strategies. Pairing me together with someone that enjoys to stop for a warm meal would inevitably lead to a conflict, similarily with a person that likes to twist the throttle or ride until exhaustion before taking a break.

Most important, when riding with others is to agree upon the rules. In this, agree to stick to the rules and agree to change the rules rather than breaking them. It is very easy to be leniant towards others who want to break with the plan... but only for so many times before war breaks out.

Time Allowance Cards
Sticking to the plan to achieve max time efficiency at all times may have unintended effects. We are not 100% alike in our needs, and a good strategy therefore requires some flexibility to keep everyone you are riding with happy.

One great solution to be able to stick to the rules and allowing felxibility at the same time is to give everyone in the group a limited number of "Time Allowance Cards". Each of these should have a specific time allowance noted on them, with or without conditions applied. i.e. +15, +30, and +60 minutes without conditions, and +6 or +12 hours with conditions applied (i.e. pay for the or the room). Allow one to be able to combine cards - i.e. 15+30 = 45 min. Also allow to add them to a planned stop, i.e. the 15 min lunch stop to make for an hour, or the 12 hours at the end of the ride to make for an additional full day and night at a specific logation - effectively an extra rest day.

By turning in a card, a person can claim the right to add the noted time to the day's leg, without argument.. to take the more scenic route or to make an extended stop somewhere - i.e. a cafe.

In this strategy it is important to add up the time of all the cards to your groups itinerary. Also, make sure there is a limit to these cards, i.e one of each of the shorter durations for every week of travel, and one of each of the longer durations for every three or four weeks of travel.
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  #2  
Old 23 Jul 2018
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Some great tips!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheelie View Post
If you stay at a place where they serve breakfast, be there when it opens. Make sure you have checked out and that the bike is packed, fueled, serviced and ready to go.
On the Breakfast thing:
I agree, early departure, way to go, especially if riding in HOT conditions. Often times small towns, 3rd world countries you may not have a cafe open at 6 am or even by 7 am for breakfast.

My strategy is just GO and ride. Within 80 to 150 km. I look for a place to eat ... without veering too far off my main route. (sometimes if off road, you WILL have to make your own breakfast!)

I don't mind taking half hour to a good breakfast. You have to be flexible here, improvise and think on your feet. Eat where and when you can. (TIP: you won't starve!)

Often I don't eat lunch, maybe just a snack. Heavy meals and long days do NOT go well together! Eat Light-Stay Alert.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheelie View Post
Ride slow
Everyone has to find their own pace. But If on group ride, always best to keep up, even if they are riding quicker than you're used to. Stragglers slow the whole group down, get lost and if we have to send someone back to search, wastes hours of riding time. KEEP UP! Our groups are experts and we always do "re-groups" at every new road. In heavy traffic Urban areas ... this is tough to do.

I've done medium sized group rides 30 years, mostly between 6 to 12 riders, mostly within USA, but sometimes Mexico.

True about faster speeds = more fatigue, more tire wear. On flat, straight roads, we usually don't go over 75 mph. But on really nice mountain pass twisty roads ... we wick it up and have fun. It's what we do!

If on a RTW ride Solo or multi month trip, a slower approach would be advised. Make the equipment (and your body) last!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheelie View Post
Stop often, but short
When in small group or solo I don't stop as much, usually fuel and a stretch.
Here are a few tips I have:
Always stop in the shade!
Take off helmet/jacket (as noted!)
Use bathroom and drink water.

A Word On Water
By now everyone should be riding with a Camel Back (or similar) drink system You should be drinking constantly when riding if hot. Don't wait until you get to your next stop ... In hot weather this is really important. Dehydration will be a major cause of Fatigue. DRINK DRINK DRINK! Add Alcohol to a dehydrated rider? (better sleep in next day!)

At the fuel stop I also refill Camel Back (3 liters), look at chain, check oil, have a look at tires.

5 to 7 minute stops would never work for me. But I can ride about 180 miles before taking a break.

For snacks I often get a Take Out Sandwich (Subway in USA) at end of day and carry to eat next day. Do shopping end of day, once relaxed and off the bike. Find a real market, get what you like for next day ... or take it back to your room/campsite, eat if now or make a sandwich for next day!

One thing that really helped me do back to back 400 mile days, was doing stretching at every stop. This really helps me. YMMV. But sitting still on a bike 10 hours a day, things can get cramped up. S T R E T C H!!!
You will feel better!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheelie View Post
If you instead force yourself to limit yourself to 60-80% of max, there is a high chance that you can carry on riding at this level day after day with only a complete rest day every fifth to seventh day...
Keep in mind there is a period of adjustment for most riders. Unless you're a hardened "Iron Butt" competitor, then it may take you a week or so of riding to acclimate to doing LONG riding days. So, at first, don't push it. And your "Rest days" off the bike are, IMO, crucial! Not only to rest ... but to enjoy your trip!

All day riding, All day, everyday makes Jack a very dull boy!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheelie View Post
Quit before it gets dark
Riding at night is far more straneous than riding during during the day. The risk of putting you or your bike into harm's way - adding to your time, is also much greater.
Some places are safe and easy to ride at night, others, not so much. In super hot, dangerous HEAT I sometimes ride at night ... yes, even in Mexico. I've been doing this since I was a kid. Is it dangerous? It can be, but so is riding a motorcycle!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheelie View Post
If you need tons of toilet paper to clean your bum, your ass will get sore. If it is not prisitne, your ass will also get sore - it's a catch 22 if you don't have lots of fiber in your diet. Psyllum husks is the cure.
Some may laugh at this ... but if it happens to you ... not so funny! I use diaper rash creme, padded bicycle shorts. Super painful, so keep it clean and dry.

I'm not fond of the "having to go urgently" aspect of using the dietary supplements. If riding a bike ... this could get you in trouble (very messy cleanup! ) ... so use with consideration!

The "buddy system" is good. Stay with your buddy, no matter what. I also agree, 2 to 3 rider groups are easiest to manage. I've done a bunch of miles solo, so that can work too but not without risk.
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Old 23 Jul 2018
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Strewth, this is Concrete Arse Club (or whatever the daft sods call themselves) stuff. Didn't you miss the catheter off the list?

The world moves at 40 mph. You've got to eat so many calories and sleep for a few hours (although I'm sure a few have tried Benzadrine), but it that's it I aren't going to bother.

Do fewer miles and take a few more days over it. Decent breakfast after a few miles, a couple of pints before the bar closes and stopping when I want a cuppa, a pee or to take piccies for me please.

Andy
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Old 24 Jul 2018
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TMI.
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  #5  
Old 25 Jul 2018
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Hi Wheelie:

A very useful and thought-provoking post, thank you for taking the time to share your ideas.

But... not all of us are the same, so, with my tongue firmly in my cheek, may I offer an alternative perspective:

Sleep In:
Remember, you bought that motorcycle for recreational use, not to get you to the office every day. A vacation (or retirement, as the case may be) is a time to relax and unwind. So, find out what the check-out time at your hotel is, and ask for a wake-up call an hour before check-out time. There's nothing better than having a good long sleep before a day of riding.

Pick a DIRECTION, not a destination:
I learned long ago to not pick a specific destination, but instead, to simply pick a direction to go. For example, if I start in Zurich, I might decide to go south-west. I'll aim the motorcycle more or less at the south end of Portugal, but it's not essential that I eventually get there. After a few weeks, maybe I might get to the end of the road, then again, maybe I won't.

Don't fall into the trap of telling yourself "I need to get to this specific city by the end of the day". Just get on the moto in the late morning (or maybe even around noon hour, if you loitered around enjoying that third cup of coffee), and head down the road.

Eat at McDonalds along the way
It's predictable, it's stress-free, you know what it's going to cost, the Wi-Fi is free and fast, and they'll always give you lots of paper towels to use to clean your visor and your windshield.

Carrying food with you on the moto is very risky - the food might spoil from the heat, and if that happens, you won't need Psyllium to promote peristalsis - you'll be able to sh1t through the eye of a needle from 10 meters away, and that's no fun at all.

Ride until you decide you have had enough...
Then, pull out your smartphone, launch TripAdvisor, and look for a good hotel nearby. You'll always find one within about 15 minutes of wherever you are. The TripAdvisor app will tell you what the prices are and whether they have space for the night, and the reviews will tell you whether the place is worth a visit or best avoided.

Consider riding at night
It's cooler, there are fewer cars on the road, and it's generally less stressful than riding during the day. If you got a late start in the morning (or early afternoon), and you're still going strong when the sun sets, why bother stopping?

Ride Alone, never with others
Riding with others just adds stress to the whole trip. If you travel on your own, you have control over your schedule and your itinerary. You can "go with the flow" rather than having to "stick to the plan".

Always be open to the idea of staying in one place for a few days
So, you checked into the hotel, the staff were friendly, the property is tranquil, you had a nice dinner and a good night's sleep... why leave in the morning? When you get that wake-up call at 10:00 AM or 10:30 AM, just tell the front desk that you'll be staying another day, hang up the phone, and go back to sleep.

Regards,
Michael
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Old 26 Jul 2018
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Ha sounds like retirement to me. I would add another one re the wake up call.... Ignore it as u drank far too much jd with the night shift manager and are totally incapable of thought. Then stay at same hotel for another night.....
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Old 26 Jul 2018
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PanEuropean View Post
Sleep In:
SNIP .. So, find out what the check-out time at your hotel is, and ask for a wake-up call an hour before check-out time. There's nothing better than having a good long sleep before a day of riding.
Certainly can be good idea in certain situations. I've done this after several hard days travel. Good to re-charge and relax. Long days on the bike can run you down and can ruin the "Joy" of travel. It can become WORK. I try to avoid that.

Sometimes sleeping in may not work. In super hot weather I like an early AM start. Get miles done before it gets unbearably HOT ... then relax somewhere nice later in the day, go to bed early ... and start over again, well rested.

Also, some borders need to be tackled early in the day ... or late in the day or night, depending on the border. (some 24/7, some not)

Sleeping in can work if you're up against crap weather and hoping for things to clear up and have time to wait it out. Sometimes waiting makes good sense especially if super cold. Don't fight the weather ... on a bike you most always lose.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PanEuropean View Post
Pick a DIRECTION, not a destination:
I learned long ago to not pick a specific destination, but instead, to simply pick a direction to go. For example, if I start in Zurich, I might decide to go south-west. I'll aim the motorcycle more or less at the south end of Portugal, but it's not essential that I eventually get there. After a few weeks, maybe I might get to the end of the road, then again, maybe I won't.
I like this one, did this all over France and Spain. Sure, I read guide books for great sights ... but somedays would just follow my nose ... and it worked out GREAT! I went to places in France that rarely saw a tourist, and wandered lost all throughout the roads in the Pyrennes. (great riding) So refreshing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PanEuropean View Post
Eat at McDonalds along the way
It's predictable, it's stress-free, you know what it's going to cost, the Wi-Fi is free and fast, and they'll always give you lots of paper towels to use to clean your visor and your windshield.
I'd rather eat dirt. When your urban travel skills improve, you may learn to find decent eateries without a lot of time searching. Google very handy and various other sites. Also, talking to locals can produce good results.

I see the practicality of going to a Mc D's (Wi-Fi, clean bathrooms) but can't eat there more than once a month ... MAX. I always feel sick after eating there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PanEuropean View Post
Carrying food with you on the moto is very risky - the food might spoil from the heat,
Use common sense ... most times not a problem for me. I've done this DOZENS of times, never sick ... but you have to manage it.

Trip Adviser? They are middle men, prefer to deal directly with facility.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PanEuropean View Post
Consider riding at night
It's cooler, there are fewer cars on the road, and it's generally less stressful than riding during the day. If you got a late start in the morning (or early afternoon), and you're still going strong when the sun sets, why bother stopping?
Agree ... but most travelers do not ... and most rail against nighttime
riding. In USA, especially out in rural areas, it is not, IMO, dangerous.

You DO need good lighting. Some parts of 3rd world countries are not all that safe to ride at night. But suss it out and decide.

I've crossed Mexico at night several times. But shite can go down ... so it's not always a green light. In Mexico, be careful riding on weekends/holidays ... day or night. Drunk driving is rampant.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PanEuropean View Post
Ride Alone, never with others
Riding with others just adds stress to the whole trip. If you travel on your own, you have control over your schedule and your itinerary. You can "go with the flow" rather than having to "stick to the plan".
I like going solo too but a 2 to 4 person group can be great ... and you have the buddy system advantage. The challenge is having everyone be in sync.
I've done it many years ... it usually works out.

Solo travel is in a way, a luxury ... but not without risk.
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Old 27 Jul 2018
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riding slow, travel fast? - don't agree with that at all, if you ride slow you arrive late. Cant cheat the physics.

But, if you maintain steady pace which is within your riding upper limits and suitable for the road/weather condition then you travel fast.
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Old 28 Jul 2018
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Your last sentence is the key however. Conditions can rule how fast you can ride ... and survive.

On my 90K mile Vstrom I'd sometimes average 90 mph on empty Northern Mexico highways. But in traffic dense Cent. America ... you won't last long riding fast and aggressive.

Riding fast would wear out a rear tire Quik-Time and drive chains won't last long either. Like half the distance going a bit slower.

So, it's all a trade off. Depends what you enjoy, if you're on a tight schedule or are wicking it up with your buddies.

(TIP: don't get hurt in a foreign country ... things may get a bit complicated! )
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World's most listened to Adventure Motorbike Show!
Check the RAW segments; Grant, your HU host is on every month!
Episodes below to listen to while you, err, pretend to do something or other...

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

"Ultimate global guide for red-blooded bikers planning overseas exploration. Covers choice & preparation of best bike, shipping overseas, baggage design, riding techniques, travel health, visas, documentation, safety and useful addresses." Recommended. (Grant)



Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance.

Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance™ combines into a single integrated program the best evacuation and rescue with the premier travel insurance coverages designed for adventurers.

Led by special operations veterans, Stanford Medicine affiliated physicians, paramedics and other travel experts, Ripcord is perfect for adventure seekers, climbers, skiers, sports enthusiasts, hunters, international travelers, humanitarian efforts, expeditions and more.

Ripcord travel protection is now available for ALL nationalities, and travel is covered on motorcycles of all sizes!


 

What others say about HU...

"This site is the BIBLE for international bike travelers." Greg, Australia

"Thank you! The web site, The travels, The insight, The inspiration, Everything, just thanks." Colin, UK

"My friend and I are planning a trip from Singapore to England... We found (the HU) site invaluable as an aid to planning and have based a lot of our purchases (bikes, riding gear, etc.) on what we have learned from this site." Phil, Australia

"I for one always had an adventurous spirit, but you and Susan lit the fire for my trip and I'll be forever grateful for what you two do to inspire others to just do it." Brent, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the (video) series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring!" Jennifer, Canada

"Your worldwide organisation and events are the Go To places to for all serious touring and aspiring touring bikers." Trevor, South Africa

"This is the answer to all my questions." Haydn, Australia

"Keep going the excellent work you are doing for Horizons Unlimited - I love it!" Thomas, Germany

Lots more comments here!



Five books by Graham Field!

Diaries of a compulsive traveller
by Graham Field
Book, eBook, Audiobook

"A compelling, honest, inspiring and entertaining writing style with a built-in feel-good factor" Get them NOW from the authors' website and Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, Amazon.co.uk.



Back Road Map Books and Backroad GPS Maps for all of Canada - a must have!

New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80G/S.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events all over the world with the help of volunteers; we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, or ask questions on the HUBB. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.




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