Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Planning, Trip > Staying Healthy on the Road
Staying Healthy on the Road Medical info, e.g. malaria, vaccinations, travel medical tips, medical insurance, where to find a doctor.
Photo by Bettina Hoebenreich, At the foot of the Bear Glaciers, eternal ice, British Columbia, Canada

Adventure is what you make it

Photo by Bettina Hoebenreich, at the foot of the Bear Glaciers, British Columbia, Canada.



Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance.

Like Tree4Likes
  • 1 Post By Lonerider
  • 1 Post By Bones667
  • 2 Post By Pongo

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 16 Sep 2014
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: E Yorkshireman...in the Chum Phae area, Thailand
Posts: 1,262
Sore left wrist

I came back from a few days in Hamburg where I went to visit a mate. http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hub...n-xt600e-78045
Since I have been back and during the ride from Hamburg back to the Europoort my left wrist has been really sore, I think I have a little bit of Arthritis in it but its never bothered me this much before.
Going to hamburg was ok as it was all Autobahn, but coming back I went the scenic route which meant a lot of towns and villages, this meant more use of the clutch which is where i think it started.

I don't want it to become a show stopper when i go on my in the planning stage longer trip

I do have an off road wrist support which i used to use whilst doing enduro

Any ideas

Thanks, Wayne
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 16 Sep 2014
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Bristol UK
Posts: 104
Hi Wayne

You could always swap the XT for a Scooter mate No clutch = no sore wrist ...

So.. how did the XT hold up and was the sheepskin Butt bumper worth the money? ... and more important how was the German

I'm off to Belgium Friday for for a few days so will also be sampling a or 2

Hopefully the and stays away this time

Cheers
Bones
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 16 Sep 2014
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Bristol UK
Posts: 104
One more thing Wayne... Hamburg = Reeperbahn .... Mmmmm... could be where the sore wrist came from
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 16 Sep 2014
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: E Yorkshireman...in the Chum Phae area, Thailand
Posts: 1,262
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bones667 View Post
Hi Wayne

You could always swap the XT for a Scooter mate No clutch = no sore wrist ...

So.. how did the XT hold up and was the sheepskin Butt bumper worth the money? ... and more important how was the German

I'm off to Belgium Friday for for a few days so will also be sampling a or 2

Hopefully the and stays away this time

Cheers
Bones
The XT help up well, not sure about the sheepskin though, still had a bit of a sore ar*e but not from the Reeperbahn
The was as good as it gets, I love the Wiesse
Enjoy Belgium and if you get the chance go to Bastogne, good roads, good military history if your in to that and a great town square with loads of cafe bars

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bones667 View Post
One more thing Wayne... Hamburg = Reeperbahn .... Mmmmm... could be where the sore wrist came from
Ummmmm, could be, I am left handed
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 16 Sep 2014
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Bristol UK
Posts: 104
Ha Ha..

Thanks for the info about Bastogne but doubt I'll venture that way as I'll be camping just North of Bruges to visit a 50 hour party! Bar opens 8pm Friday and stays open for 50 hours... so wont be doing much riding but a little drinking is on the cards I think

Will have to put Bastogne on the 'to do' list as I like the millitary historic sites. Been to Ypres and surrounding area a few times. Lovely place.

Also been to Hamburg lots with work so know the areas as well.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 18 Sep 2014
Pongo's Avatar
R.I.P. - 2020
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Cotes d'Armor, France.
Posts: 377
On a serious note! your wrist trouble may be caused by the clutch lever being in a poor position. I deally the lever should be just under the tips of your gloves when your hand is in a level position on the grip. If the lever is well below this then you are using all the small wrist muscles to activate the lever, which can cause pain. With the hand flat you use the forearm muscles, which of course is much less of a strain.
__________________
-''It is better to walk alone than with a crowd going in the wrong direction''. ( Herman Siu)
-'' Live life then give life '' (www.lltgl.org.uk)
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 19 Sep 2014
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: E Yorkshireman...in the Chum Phae area, Thailand
Posts: 1,262
Thanks Pongo
I will have a look at that

Wayne
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 21 Sep 2014
DrWolle's Avatar
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: on the banks of the river Elbe
Posts: 42
Clutchlever

Wayne, just as Pongo said, the wrong position of the clutchlever could be the problem.
As a second option you can change the clutchcable, maybe to one with kevlar coatet.
__________________
Greetings
Wolle
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 21 Sep 2014
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: E Yorkshireman...in the Chum Phae area, Thailand
Posts: 1,262
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrWolle View Post
Wayne, just as Pongo said, the wrong position of the clutchlever could be the problem.
As a second option you can change the clutchcable, maybe to one with kevlar coatet.
Cheers
I had a good time in Hamburg, did a little RR

Wayne
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 21 Sep 2014
mollydog's Avatar
R.I.P.
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: california
Posts: 3,822
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrWolle View Post
Wayne, just as Pongo said, the wrong position of the clutchlever could be the problem.
As a second option you can change the clutchcable, maybe to one with kevlar coatet.
A new cable would be my suggestion as well. Old cables can get stubborn, and many times oily won't help. I would buy a NEW OEM Yamaha cable, not an aftermarket one. The OEM ones are just better. Period ... and stay better longer. Most are Teflon coated internally ... never oil them.

Of course correct angle of the lever is important too. Less bend is better.

REST your wrist when riding. Gentle stretching, take hand off bars when riding, let it hang, allow blood to recirculate a bit. Once it feels better, begin strength training, starting out very slowly.

I had an old Football wrist injury that Dogged me for years ... so went through the above, it took years but its better now. The stiff clutches of the old days were killer on a bad wrist. Modern clutches are so much better,
most very light pull.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 24 Sep 2014
Big Yellow Tractor's Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: England
Posts: 649
Another for check position and fit a new cable. We never notice when things deteriorate gradually. I popped a new clutch cable on my DRZ because it was a little frayed and was amazed to find I now had an easy "two finger" clutch even with a shorty lever.

You do know that you don't actually need the clutch for upshifts; if you hold the gear lever up as you're accelerating through one gear, it will snick seamlessly into the next as you chop the throttle. Pretending to operate the clutch will help with learning the timing needed. I very rarely use the clutch for upshifts once out of first.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 24 Sep 2014
Contributing Member
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Northeast US
Posts: 26
Also make sure your wrist is warm. I've had jackets that were a bit short in the sleeve leaving a bit of gap with normal gloves. Add in the wind chill and hands and wrists can suffer even while the core is warm enough. Even without a gap, getting too cold will reduce blood circulation to the limbs and cause cold hands and feet. Making sure there's a warm wrap for your neck helps here.

Perhaps you already know all this and it's not part of the problem. Thought I'd mention anyway.rest
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 24 Sep 2014
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: E Yorkshireman...in the Chum Phae area, Thailand
Posts: 1,262
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Yellow Tractor View Post
Another for check position and fit a new cable. We never notice when things deteriorate gradually. I popped a new clutch cable on my DRZ because it was a little frayed and was amazed to find I now had an easy "two finger" clutch even with a shorty lever.

You do know that you don't actually need the clutch for upshifts; if you hold the gear lever up as you're accelerating through one gear, it will snick seamlessly into the next as you chop the throttle. Pretending to operate the clutch will help with learning the timing needed. I very rarely use the clutch for upshifts once out of first.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grinnin View Post
Also make sure your wrist is warm. I've had jackets that were a bit short in the sleeve leaving a bit of gap with normal gloves. Add in the wind chill and hands and wrists can suffer even while the core is warm enough. Even without a gap, getting too cold will reduce blood circulation to the limbs and cause cold hands and feet. Making sure there's a warm wrap for your neck helps here.

Perhaps you already know all this and it's not part of the problem. Thought I'd mention anyway.rest
Thanks for the answers guys

All the best
Wayne
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Anyone know Andrew Waters in UK ref XR400 left in Mongolia? Harty The HUBB PUB 4 29 Jun 2014 17:06
I left my crashed my KLR in Cusco, Peru. Advice? stovepipe SOUTH AMERICA 5 23 Oct 2013 03:47
1991 xt600e left side panel busterdog Yamaha Tech 15 14 Jul 2013 05:42
sore arse......... lynch180 The HUBB PUB 3 11 Jul 2012 15:37
left over bits. royzx7r Kawasaki Tech 4 7 Mar 2012 23:21

 
 

Announcements

Thinking about traveling? Not sure about the whole thing? Watch the HU Achievable Dream Video Trailers and then get ALL the information you need to get inspired and learn how to travel anywhere in the world!

Have YOU ever wondered who has ridden around the world? We did too - and now here's the list of Circumnavigators!
Check it out now
, and add your information if we didn't find you.

Next HU Eventscalendar

HU Event and other updates on the HUBB Forum "Traveller's Advisories" thread.
ALL Dates subject to change.

2024:

Add yourself to the Updates List for each event!

Questions about an event? Ask here

HUBBUK: info

See all event details

 
World's most listened to Adventure Motorbike Show!
Check the RAW segments; Grant, your HU host is on every month!
Episodes below to listen to while you, err, pretend to do something or other...

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

"Ultimate global guide for red-blooded bikers planning overseas exploration. Covers choice & preparation of best bike, shipping overseas, baggage design, riding techniques, travel health, visas, documentation, safety and useful addresses." Recommended. (Grant)



Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance.

Ripcord Rescue Travel Insuranceā„¢ combines into a single integrated program the best evacuation and rescue with the premier travel insurance coverages designed for adventurers.

Led by special operations veterans, Stanford Medicine affiliated physicians, paramedics and other travel experts, Ripcord is perfect for adventure seekers, climbers, skiers, sports enthusiasts, hunters, international travelers, humanitarian efforts, expeditions and more.

Ripcord travel protection is now available for ALL nationalities, and travel is covered on motorcycles of all sizes!


 

What others say about HU...

"This site is the BIBLE for international bike travelers." Greg, Australia

"Thank you! The web site, The travels, The insight, The inspiration, Everything, just thanks." Colin, UK

"My friend and I are planning a trip from Singapore to England... We found (the HU) site invaluable as an aid to planning and have based a lot of our purchases (bikes, riding gear, etc.) on what we have learned from this site." Phil, Australia

"I for one always had an adventurous spirit, but you and Susan lit the fire for my trip and I'll be forever grateful for what you two do to inspire others to just do it." Brent, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the (video) series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring!" Jennifer, Canada

"Your worldwide organisation and events are the Go To places to for all serious touring and aspiring touring bikers." Trevor, South Africa

"This is the answer to all my questions." Haydn, Australia

"Keep going the excellent work you are doing for Horizons Unlimited - I love it!" Thomas, Germany

Lots more comments here!



Five books by Graham Field!

Diaries of a compulsive traveller
by Graham Field
Book, eBook, Audiobook

"A compelling, honest, inspiring and entertaining writing style with a built-in feel-good factor" Get them NOW from the authors' website and Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, Amazon.co.uk.



Back Road Map Books and Backroad GPS Maps for all of Canada - a must have!

New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80G/S.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events all over the world with the help of volunteers; we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, or ask questions on the HUBB. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 13:15.