Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Planning, Trip > Staying Healthy on the Road
Staying Healthy on the Road Medical info, e.g. malaria, vaccinations, travel medical tips, medical insurance, where to find a doctor.
Photo by Bettina Hoebenreich, At the foot of the Bear Glaciers, eternal ice, British Columbia, Canada

Adventure is what you make it

Photo by Bettina Hoebenreich, at the foot of the Bear Glaciers, British Columbia, Canada.



Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 16 Oct 2006
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Greece
Posts: 109
Long time Malaria protection

Malarone suggested for a maximum of 28 days.
Lariam suggested for a maximum of 3 months.
I don't know the maximum period suggested for Doxycycline, but I know that it isn't so effective and I 'll travel to high risk areas. Also I have heard that sometimes it has serious side effects.

I am planning a trip from Greece to India for something more than 6 months. I 'll start travelling at April. Of course, I 'll protect myself from get bitten and I 'll have Malarone as treatment, but what about prevention for so long time?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 16 Oct 2006
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Devon,UK
Posts: 47
Hi there,
The whole problem is getting a correct balance of risk against reward. A case of malaria is nasty, but almost always cureable. The medicines that are most effective in any given area are often not so effective outside that area. They are also usually freely available in the area and difficult to get hold of outside. Especially in Europe where many are not licensed. Artemisin based drugs are little short of phenomenal in Africa.
From my experience any of the medications you use as a prophylaxis are bad for you to a degree in the long term.
I spend a large amount of time in Sub saharan africa and no longer use any. They are either of limited effectiveness (Doxy) or too expensive (Malarone) or just plain nasty (Lariam).
Obviously every person reacts differently. Most common side effects of Doxy are nausea after taking it and extreme photosensitivity(1 in 10 people). It is a strong broad spectrum antibiotic as well with all that entails.
I have known people use malarone for 18 months without a problem (but the company was paying!)
Lariam sent me barking mad after just one tablet.
In the end it will be a personal choice. I have ended up with Malaria more than 10 times. As long as you are aware of it then you should be OK which ever route you choose and whether you choose to treat or block it.
Finally, as you pointed out, the only sure way is not to get bitten. Cover up and spray well in evenings and early mornings if warm. Beware shady areas during the day also.

Cheers and have a good trip.

George
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 16 Oct 2006
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 17
Be aware

Hi Furious,

I've been living in West Africa for the last 10 months. The thing with taking preventative drugs is that its not 100% fool proof, and if you do get malaria its harder to detect as the drugs suppress the symptoms. I'd say your best bet is not to take any preventative drugs, but to make yourself aware of what the exact symptoms are. Carry a self test kit or take drugs when you feel the symptoms coming on. It wont cause any damage.

all the best,

Camps
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 17 Oct 2006
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Greece
Posts: 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by camps
Hi Furious,

I've been living in West Africa for the last 10 months. The thing with taking preventative drugs is that its not 100% fool proof, and if you do get malaria its harder to detect as the drugs suppress the symptoms. I'd say your best bet is not to take any preventative drugs, but to make yourself aware of what the exact symptoms are. Carry a self test kit or take drugs when you feel the symptoms coming on. It wont cause any damage.

all the best,

Camps
I think this is the best solution. Are there several self kits? Do you have to suggest anyone?
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 19 Oct 2006
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 17
Coartem / U-test

Coartem made by Novartis is the best to use as treatment. U-test makes a self test product, it's called "U-test Malaria", i'm not sure if this is a international product of if its only made in South Africa.

Safe travels,

Camps.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 19 Oct 2006
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: turkiye
Posts: 27
Malaria prophylaxis

dear furious,
you might find the link below useful. take a look at, the "yellow book" also. many other useful recommendations are included.

http://www.cdc.gov/travel/regionalma...htm#prevention

This quote is from a medical paper on the very subject : "..Backpackers and other travelers who move from one malarious area to another are not usually familiar with local medical facilities, and they are unable to estimate the laboratory quality of malaria testing. Continuous chemoprophylaxis should therefore be encouraged when indicated. Priority should be given to drugs that may be used or both chemoprophylaxis and standby, such as mefloquine and atovaquone-proguanil
(Malarone-NB) rather than mefloquine (Lariam-NB)." ( Long-Term Malaria Prophylaxis for Travelers; Jürgen Knobloch; Travel Med 11(6):374-378, 2004. © 2004 International Society of Travel Medicine)
NB-Nota Bene (my note)
by the way, what made you think there is a malaria outbreak in India -f I didn't get it wrong? But there IS A DENGUE threat in that region; but both malaria and dengue are transported by the mosquitos anyway. so, taking every measure for "not to be beaten" by the mosquitos would help.

wish you a happy and healthy travel.

endurin.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 23 Oct 2006
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Greece
Posts: 109
Yes, I know about Yellow Book and I 've read it. Thank you. India is a malaria high-risk region and I don't know yet how to protect myself. That's why I am a little nervous. I'm afraid that it's not enough just avoid get bitten. Of course there are another threats too but I already have the best protection I can for them.

Also I have three less serious questions :
1) Can we find inspect repellents with DEET on the road (Tyrkey, Iran, Pakistan, India)?

2) Why Lonely Planet and others suggest DEET for our skin and permethrin for our clothes? Can't we use DEET for our clothes too?

3) Do you carry the suggested mesh? How you put it over the bed at hotels?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 24 Oct 2006
beddhist's Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Whangarei, NZ
Posts: 2,214
3) I intend to use the inner part of my tent for this purpose. Has the added advantage of being free standing, if I use the poles. Don't know how well this will work.

On my previous trip we ended up buying a mossie net in India because they were so bad.
__________________
Cheers,
Peter.

Europe to NZ 2006-10
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 26 Oct 2006
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Horncastle,Lincolnshire,UK
Posts: 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by furious
Yes, I know about Yellow Book and I 've read it. Thank you. India is a malaria high-risk region and I don't know yet how to protect myself. That's why I am a little nervous. I'm afraid that it's not enough just avoid get bitten. Of course there are another threats too but I already have the best protection I can for them.

Also I have three less serious questions :
1) Can we find inspect repellents with DEET on the road (Tyrkey, Iran, Pakistan, India)?

2) Why Lonely Planet and others suggest DEET for our skin and permethrin for our clothes? Can't we use DEET for our clothes too?

3) Do you carry the suggested mesh? How you put it over the bed at hotels?

DEET in high concentrations i.e. over 80% (and maybe at less strength too) rots fabric. That's why you can't use it on clothes.

Q
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 26 Oct 2006
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Greece
Posts: 109
Thank you for your replies. I am starting to understand the thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by beddhist
3) I intend to use the inner part of my tent for this purpose. Has the added advantage of being free standing, if I use the poles. Don't know how well this will work.

On my previous trip we ended up buying a mossie net in India because they were so bad.
Do you mean to put my tent over the hotel's bed??? Will not damage this my tent because the poles will be out of the bed, at the air?

Where did you catch the mossie net in India?
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 26 Oct 2006
Atwoke's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Northumberland, UK
Posts: 219
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quintin
DEET in high concentrations i.e. over 80% (and maybe at less strength too) rots fabric. That's why you can't use it on clothes.

Q
DEET not only rots cloths, it melts plastic! Keep well away from your high-tech fibres, tents, glasses.....

You can treat cotton with DEET as it takes a long time to rot....

In most Malarious Countries you can pick up mozzie nets in loads of shops, supermarkets, on street-corners...both in Cities and up-country. For best results, make sure that the net is tucked under the matras and treated with bug killer (sold in the same places...one treatment lasts for about a month)

In terms of avoidance, wear long cotton clothes (treated), and socks! Make sure there is no standing water (birdbaths, puddles, swamps...) were you camp/stay! This reduces the need for insect repellent dramatically!

Jens
__________________
You can never have too many bikes......

BMW R100GS
Triumph Tiger 885
Yamaha XT600e

Jens is gone, but not forgotten.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 26 Oct 2006
maria41's Avatar
The franglais-riders
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 1,175
Quote:
Originally Posted by furious
2) Why Lonely Planet and others suggest DEET for our skin and permethrin for our clothes? Can't we use DEET for our clothes too?

3) Do you carry the suggested mesh? How you put it over the bed at hotels?
DEET is a repellent, and can be used with no problem against the skin. But what DEET really does is make the mosquitoes "dizzy" so that they forget to bite you. Well if you're lucky. I got mosquito bites wearing 100% DEET Jungle formula AND fully covered by thick fabric. Some mosquitoes really get hungry!

Permethrin is not an insect repellent. "It works as a contact insecticide, stunning or killing insects that come in contact with it". I would not fancy that on my skin, and would not repel.
Check this website out on DEET and Permethrin for more info:

http://www.travmed.com/trip_prep/ins...rmethrin.htm#3

cheers,

Also would like to add this bit (from website mentioned above):

"Can I use DEET and permethrin together, or is the combination unnecessary?
When maximum protection against insect bites is needed or desired, the ideal solution is to use a combination of DEET on exposed skin, and wear permethrin-treated clothing. An extended-duration DEET insect repellent (Ultrathon®) and permethrin-treated clothing is the standard personal protection system used by the U.S. military deployed in areas of the world where insect-borne disease is a real threat. One field study showed that the use of both of these products provided 99.9% protection against mosquito bites, in an environment where unprotected persons received an average of 1,188 bites per hour! "
__________________
Maria

www.franglais-riders.com
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 27 Oct 2006
beddhist's Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Whangarei, NZ
Posts: 2,214
Quote:
Originally Posted by furious
Do you mean to put my tent over the hotel's bed??? Will not damage this my tent because the poles will be out of the bed, at the air?

Where did you catch the mossie net in India?
As I wrote, I haven't tried it yet, but I think the tent floor is sufficiently strong to support the two poles. It doesn't have to withstand any storm, after all, unless I turn the ceiling fan on max.

Can't remember where we bought the net, some bazar somewhere.
__________________
Cheers,
Peter.

Europe to NZ 2006-10
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 30 Oct 2006
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Greece
Posts: 109
Thank you very much! This site

http://www.travmed.com

that maria41 mentioned is veeeery useful.

I understood that the best chemoprophylaxis for a motorcyclist in that area for so long time is the doxycycline. I thought that it isn't so effective but I read in this site that it's more than 90% effective against chloroquine-resistant falciparum malaria!

I only have the question if we can find DEET and permethrin on the road (Tyrkey, Iran, Pakistan, India).
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 31 Oct 2006
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Devon,UK
Posts: 47
Beware,
Doxy can be 90% effective but the malaria parasite is very adaptable and there will be regions of the world where it has gained some resistance. Test it before you go. I have seen 2nd degree sunburn from some people who reacted to it.
Insect repellents are certainly available in Turkey, and India and definately in the major cities of Iran and Pakistan.
Mossie nets are fairly simple to attach. Always travel with a double size, some very light poly string and duct tape. A couple of small nails can usually be placed into cracks in walls, doors, windows etc. You should be able to fix it with a combo of these.
Re: Coartem suggested above. It works well for some rpeople and not so well for others
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Long Time Lurker!!! Nilraf Yamaha Tech 0 28 Jul 2006 23:16
How long time Europe/Nepal Dizzie West and South Asia 3 10 Aug 2004 23:47
Possible duration for malaria protection? tam Staying Healthy on the Road 2 1 Sep 2003 08:40
First time long term traveller Helena Which Bike? 4 11 Aug 2003 11:41

 
 

Announcements

Thinking about traveling? Not sure about the whole thing? Watch the HU Achievable Dream Video Trailers and then get ALL the information you need to get inspired and learn how to travel anywhere in the world!

Have YOU ever wondered who has ridden around the world? We did too - and now here's the list of Circumnavigators!
Check it out now
, and add your information if we didn't find you.

Next HU Eventscalendar

HU Event and other updates on the HUBB Forum "Traveller's Advisories" thread.
ALL Dates subject to change.

2024:

Add yourself to the Updates List for each event!

Questions about an event? Ask here

HUBBUK: info

See all event details

 
World's most listened to Adventure Motorbike Show!
Check the RAW segments; Grant, your HU host is on every month!
Episodes below to listen to while you, err, pretend to do something or other...

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

"Ultimate global guide for red-blooded bikers planning overseas exploration. Covers choice & preparation of best bike, shipping overseas, baggage design, riding techniques, travel health, visas, documentation, safety and useful addresses." Recommended. (Grant)



Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance.

Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance™ combines into a single integrated program the best evacuation and rescue with the premier travel insurance coverages designed for adventurers.

Led by special operations veterans, Stanford Medicine affiliated physicians, paramedics and other travel experts, Ripcord is perfect for adventure seekers, climbers, skiers, sports enthusiasts, hunters, international travelers, humanitarian efforts, expeditions and more.

Ripcord travel protection is now available for ALL nationalities, and travel is covered on motorcycles of all sizes!


 

What others say about HU...

"This site is the BIBLE for international bike travelers." Greg, Australia

"Thank you! The web site, The travels, The insight, The inspiration, Everything, just thanks." Colin, UK

"My friend and I are planning a trip from Singapore to England... We found (the HU) site invaluable as an aid to planning and have based a lot of our purchases (bikes, riding gear, etc.) on what we have learned from this site." Phil, Australia

"I for one always had an adventurous spirit, but you and Susan lit the fire for my trip and I'll be forever grateful for what you two do to inspire others to just do it." Brent, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the (video) series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring!" Jennifer, Canada

"Your worldwide organisation and events are the Go To places to for all serious touring and aspiring touring bikers." Trevor, South Africa

"This is the answer to all my questions." Haydn, Australia

"Keep going the excellent work you are doing for Horizons Unlimited - I love it!" Thomas, Germany

Lots more comments here!



Five books by Graham Field!

Diaries of a compulsive traveller
by Graham Field
Book, eBook, Audiobook

"A compelling, honest, inspiring and entertaining writing style with a built-in feel-good factor" Get them NOW from the authors' website and Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, Amazon.co.uk.



Back Road Map Books and Backroad GPS Maps for all of Canada - a must have!

New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80G/S.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events all over the world with the help of volunteers; we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, or ask questions on the HUBB. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 18:28.