Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Planning, Trip > Staying Healthy on the Road
Staying Healthy on the Road Medical info, e.g. malaria, vaccinations, travel medical tips, medical insurance, where to find a doctor.
Photo by Gregor Zajac, Poland; Crossing Rothang Pass; India 2011 tour, Royal Enfield 350ccm

Adventure is what you make it

Photo by Gregor Zajac, Poland; Crossing Rothang Pass, India 2011 tour, Royal Enfield 350ccm.



Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 25 Aug 2008
cruthas's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Boulder, co
Posts: 107
Central and South American Vaccinations?

I am wondering what vaccinations I should get before motorcycle trip November 1st? What do you think is required vs recommended? How much malaria meds should I take with me for a year maybe longer? I will only take it in areas I know have a high risk. Also I have not been able to find any information DENGUE, nobody in Boulder, Denver, Colorado area seems to have heard of it? Any help would be great? I just don't want to go to a travel clinic and get 50 recommended vaccinations and come out with 50 holes in my body and pay $500 so any help knowing what vaccinations I should get would be great.
Thanks in advance
__________________
keep your front wheel ahead of your rear wheel
www.mototheworld.com
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 26 Aug 2008
PocketHead's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Sucre, Bolivia
Posts: 535
http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/destinationList.aspx

Has recommendations there depending on what it is you're doing or where you're going
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 26 Aug 2008
cruthas's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Boulder, co
Posts: 107
So what I have come up with for recommended shots for Central and South America are,

Hepatitis A
Hepatitis B
Prescription for Malaria (Talk to a doctor for more information on what type to take, some prescriptions don't in certain areas)
Typhoid
Rabies
Yellow Fever
Dengue (I have not found anyone around here that even knows about this disease but it has been on the incline in recent years so it is worth checking out. The Website from above has some great information from country to country. A lady at AAA had recommended it to me also. Calling AAA is another great resource I have found. Hope this helps anyone interested.
__________________
keep your front wheel ahead of your rear wheel
www.mototheworld.com
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 26 Aug 2008
PocketHead's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Sucre, Bolivia
Posts: 535
I'm not looking forward to the immunisations at all... if I were you I'd also find out which ones need to be done in advance and only do them if you need them.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 27 Aug 2008
cruthas's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Boulder, co
Posts: 107
I agree with you pockethead,
These are the most common diseases down there (I have found). I am not looking forward to these either but if it is going to save me from getting ill and having to keep up on it for the rest of my life I will get them done. The ones that I listed are the vaccinations that are most commonly needed. For me all of them matter because I am taking a year plus motorcycle trip from Colorado to the tip of Argentina. Maybe you are doing the same but I plan on being in remote areas that are high risk areas and for me all of them matter. I will be seeing a doctor Thursday so I will report back after that and give an approximate cost of all vaccinations.
__________________
keep your front wheel ahead of your rear wheel
www.mototheworld.com
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 27 Aug 2008
PocketHead's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Sucre, Bolivia
Posts: 535
Quote:
Originally Posted by cruthas View Post
I agree with you pockethead,
These are the most common diseases down there (I have found). I am not looking forward to these either but if it is going to save me from getting ill and having to keep up on it for the rest of my life I will get them done. The ones that I listed are the vaccinations that are most commonly needed. For me all of them matter because I am taking a year plus motorcycle trip from Colorado to the tip of Argentina. Maybe you are doing the same but I plan on being in remote areas that are high risk areas and for me all of them matter. I will be seeing a doctor Thursday so I will report back after that and give an approximate cost of all vaccinations.
Cool thanks.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 28 Aug 2008
cruthas's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Boulder, co
Posts: 107
Update on the vaccinations. I saw a pretty cool doctor today. The only shots I "needed" and should be worried about are,
Yellow Fever
Typhoid
Hepatitis B
Prescription to Malaria 60 days worth, she said I can get more down there.
That is it. Dengue is another common disease down there with no cure yet. The mosquitos that are infected come out during the day and the only way to protect yourself is to use bug repellent with deet. She was very helpful and said there are many diseases out there but you really dont have to worry about them unless you are in certain remote areas. The whole visit with the consultaion was $375 The consultaion was $66. I hope this helps anyone who is curious about this portion off preping for their trip.
__________________
keep your front wheel ahead of your rear wheel
www.mototheworld.com
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 29 Aug 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Norwich,Ontario,Canada
Posts: 1,049
Consider adding to the short list of required vaccinations a course of DUKORAL the effective oral vaccine against travellers diarrhea and cholera. You can get it at a pharmacy without prescription but may need to order it in , or get your doc to write a prescription for it .
I can vouch for its good working, haven't had one case of the trots since started using it a number of years ago for trips through Mexico and C.A.
Dukoral prevents you developing the diarrhea. Other medicine like loperamide hydrochloride ( Imodium brand name and others) go to work only after you are already dealing with the discomfort of the ailment, and they are quite strong working in your gut.
You never know when you might ingest some local bacteria.
__________________
http://advrider.com/index.php?thread....207964/page-5 then scroll down to post #93
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11 Oct 2008
RIP: 5/3/21
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Onalaska, Washington, USA
Posts: 335
Plan early for Jabs

I will be on the road in South America in 11 weeks, lots of time to get any shots I thought. Hep A is two shots six months apart. If you are going somewhere next year go see harpoon Anny and git-r-done.

Bob
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12 Oct 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Shropshire, Blighty
Posts: 346
Just my 2 centavos worth...

Firstly, Hepatitis A and Typhoid can be avoided by watching what you eat and drink and by taking care over your personal hygiene habits. If treated, Typhoid is rarely fatal. Hep. A is untreatable with medication but other than in those aged over 60 or so, is also rarely fatal.

Hepatitis B is not prevalent in Central/South America, is spread by invasive contact with blood or body fluids. So don't share needles and use a condom with the local lads/lasses. I'd be more worried about STD's in general though.

Rabies; invariably fatal, but when was the last time you got bitten by a dog, monkey whatever? It's very likely that locals will take care of any "loco" animals before you meet them. It's not really an issue, as I see it.

Malaria, Yellow Fever and Dengue are human diseases spread by bites from some mosquitos, during or shortly after the rainy season. Proof of Yellow Fever immunisation is necessary for travel to Brasil and therefore unavoidable, should you intend to go there. However, prevention of mosquito bites is the first line of defence. Use of appropriately treated nets, sprays, electric coils, cintronella incense and perhaps even garlic, have their place. Making sure you are protected during dusk is the most important thing.

Dengue has no prophylaxis and the treatment consists of fluids and anti-febriles.

You can be bitten once and contract these diseases, you can be bitten many times and not.

As far as I am aware, the extremely serious stains of Cerebral Malaria are not found in the Americas.

With regard to Malaria, you are only really at risk when others in the area have the disease. That's hard to know when you are travelling rapidly and so is choosing the correct prophylaxis. Prophylaxis is not a guarantee of protection and an alternative is to hold back your medication for treatment in the event that you contract the disease.

There are only some parts of Central/South America where Malaria is an issue, so you need to consider your routes. Some areas of the coast and the Amazonas are where you are going to potentially encounter problems. Above 800 metres you will not encounter problems. Problem is; if you take the correct prophylaxis and rely on it, you are going to need to keep taking the medication regardless of your location.

Should you decide to use it, in South American affected areas, (North), the prophylaxis/treatment is:

Atovaquone/Proguanil, Doxycycline, or Mefloquine.

In Central America, Ecuador and Bolivia the prophylaxis/treatment is: Chloroquine/Proguanil.

We have discussed this here before, but let's not forget that there are potential side-effects and damage associated with this medication.

Personally, I prefer to have the treatment available, take precautions, regulate my lifestyle...and see what happens.

Just my view.
__________________
How much does a man live, after all?
Does he live a thousand days, or one only?
For a week, or several centuries?
How long does a man spend dying?
What does it mean to say “forever”? - Pablo Neruda

Last edited by Stretcher Monkey; 12 Oct 2008 at 06:34.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 14 Oct 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Panama
Posts: 187
Yellow fever required in more than Brazil

Be aware that Brazil, which was the only South American country requiring yellow fever vaccinations, has been joined by Panama and Ecuador.

I entered Ecuador yesterday and there was a big sign at immigration stating that yellow fever vaccinations were required. However, they did not ask me for proof of vaccination. Your milage may vary.

Panama was to start requiring yellow fever shots beginning October 1. However, since so many people traveling from Panama needed the shots -- and the only clinic where they were available was swamped -- they delayed implementation until November.
__________________
Steve Barnett
Panama City, Panama

Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 14 Oct 2008
albert crutcher's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: colombia-ecuador
Posts: 218
Ecuador

Aparently the Yellow fever thing comes into action on the 1st of November
Al theturtleshead
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 2 Feb 2009
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Rockhampton, Australia
Posts: 868
Specific to Australian Travellers

Hi

With regard to Yellow Fever vac. If you are an Aussie, you must have a specific vaccination booklet showing you have a current vaccination. This is NOT for the country you are going to, it is for you to prove to the Aussie quarantine people when you go back home.

Without this Yellow Fever pass, you will not be allowed back home, except if you stay in quarantine for the required time period.

So, after it has been filled out, guard it with your life

Cheers
TravellingStrom
__________________
www.travellingstrom.com
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 11 Feb 2009
maria41's Avatar
The franglais-riders
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 1,175
malaria

You dont need to take 1 year reserve of tablets.
When travelling, I just made sure to go to a pharmacy and enquired of malaria zones where I was planning next destination. We never went to areas where malaria was a significant risk hence never used our tablets!
We only had doxycycline for 1 month with us.
Whatever you need, you can buy cheaper locally. In countries like Bolivia or Peru, where (according to a local doctor who warned us) many medicines could be fake. Use hospitals pharmacy to buy anything you need, or well established pharmacies. We just did that and it was ok. I would not travel with a big pharmacy box again. We got rid of most our stuff along the way, just too bulky and medecines are available locally.
Also, as said above, you may require a different anti-malarial depending on regions. In that case it is best to buy locally.

My husband need strong medication for high blood pressure. We bought tehm as we went along. No need for prescription, the pharmacists where always helpful and when we asked nicely checked his blood pressure for free.

Healthcare (private) overall in these countries when we needed it, was cheap and very good.

For rabies, dogs are out of control in Argentina, running wild in packs, and if you read the local papers, you will find out that they do attack and bite people! I got bitten once and nearly got bitten several more times. Most dangerous when walking in the street.
Take care with them and only if for peace of mind, get vaccinated. When walking around, if a dog (or a pack) threaten you, go down and take a stone (or pretend you do). that should send them running away.
__________________
Maria

www.franglais-riders.com
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 15 Apr 2009
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Currently in Colombia
Posts: 60
Salut Maria!

I was looking exactly for that info!
Thanks. Au prochain verre,
Isabelle & John, Wimbledon xox
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Which Central/South American countries are selling the new Tenere? MeCasa SOUTH AMERICA 10 20 Jul 2008 21:01
Central American Pass? jdsmithaz Trip Paperwork 5 9 Jan 2007 00:36
New Regs for Central American Travel AndyT Central America and Mexico 10 9 Sep 2006 21:33
Central + South American Carnet Needs mattpope Trip Paperwork 9 25 Jan 2004 06:30
Central American Mileage wvalerio SOUTH AMERICA 5 22 Jan 2002 06:55

 
 

Announcements

Thinking about traveling? Not sure about the whole thing? Watch the HU Achievable Dream Video Trailers and then get ALL the information you need to get inspired and learn how to travel anywhere in the world!

Have YOU ever wondered who has ridden around the world? We did too - and now here's the list of Circumnavigators!
Check it out now
, and add your information if we didn't find you.

Next HU Eventscalendar

HU Event and other updates on the HUBB Forum "Traveller's Advisories" thread.
ALL Dates subject to change.

2024:

  • California: April 18-21
  • Virginia: April 25-28
  • Germany Summer: May 9-12
  • CanWest: July 11-14
  • Switzerland: August 15-18
  • Romania: August
  • Ecuador: August 23-25
  • France: September
  • Austria: September 12-15
  • Queensland is back! Oct 4-7
  • Germany Autumn: Oct 31-Nov.3

Add yourself to the Updates List for each event!

Questions about an event? Ask here

HUBBUK: info

See all event details

 
World's most listened to Adventure Motorbike Show!
Check the RAW segments; Grant, your HU host is on every month!
Episodes below to listen to while you, err, pretend to do something or other...

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

"Ultimate global guide for red-blooded bikers planning overseas exploration. Covers choice & preparation of best bike, shipping overseas, baggage design, riding techniques, travel health, visas, documentation, safety and useful addresses." Recommended. (Grant)



Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance.

Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance™ combines into a single integrated program the best evacuation and rescue with the premier travel insurance coverages designed for adventurers.

Led by special operations veterans, Stanford Medicine affiliated physicians, paramedics and other travel experts, Ripcord is perfect for adventure seekers, climbers, skiers, sports enthusiasts, hunters, international travelers, humanitarian efforts, expeditions and more.

Ripcord travel protection is now available for ALL nationalities, and travel is covered on motorcycles of all sizes!


 

What others say about HU...

"This site is the BIBLE for international bike travelers." Greg, Australia

"Thank you! The web site, The travels, The insight, The inspiration, Everything, just thanks." Colin, UK

"My friend and I are planning a trip from Singapore to England... We found (the HU) site invaluable as an aid to planning and have based a lot of our purchases (bikes, riding gear, etc.) on what we have learned from this site." Phil, Australia

"I for one always had an adventurous spirit, but you and Susan lit the fire for my trip and I'll be forever grateful for what you two do to inspire others to just do it." Brent, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the (video) series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring!" Jennifer, Canada

"Your worldwide organisation and events are the Go To places to for all serious touring and aspiring touring bikers." Trevor, South Africa

"This is the answer to all my questions." Haydn, Australia

"Keep going the excellent work you are doing for Horizons Unlimited - I love it!" Thomas, Germany

Lots more comments here!



Five books by Graham Field!

Diaries of a compulsive traveller
by Graham Field
Book, eBook, Audiobook

"A compelling, honest, inspiring and entertaining writing style with a built-in feel-good factor" Get them NOW from the authors' website and Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, Amazon.co.uk.



Back Road Map Books and Backroad GPS Maps for all of Canada - a must have!

New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80G/S.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events all over the world with the help of volunteers; we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, or ask questions on the HUBB. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:46.