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Staying Healthy on the Road Medical info, e.g. malaria, vaccinations, travel medical tips, medical insurance, where to find a doctor.
Photo by Bettina Hoebenreich, At the foot of the Bear Glaciers, eternal ice, British Columbia, Canada

Adventure is what you make it

Photo by Bettina Hoebenreich, at the foot of the Bear Glaciers, British Columbia, Canada.



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  #16  
Old 11 Oct 2008
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Mmmm!

Can always get a car??

I have a friend who is 58 and she is riding the world and a keen Iron Butt rider (not my cup of tea)! So all I can say is....

Harden up guys!
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  #17  
Old 11 Oct 2008
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Can always get a car??

I have a friend who is 58 and she is riding the world and a keen Iron Butt rider (not my cup of tea)! So all I can say is....

Harden up guys!
Have to say driving back from german diesel bike rally in one hop killed my back, never normally get any back problems. Only now getting mobile with it again
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  #18  
Old 11 Oct 2008
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do some crunches ya lazy old bastards
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  #19  
Old 11 Oct 2008
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I've had two discs removed and one trimmed and I find the most important thing I have to do is make an effort to keep my back as straight as I can. I can do 800 mile days fairly easy but I find walking and stretching at gas stops really helps. I have yet to use a kidney belt, but I'm considering getting one.

As far as bad back camping goes, I use an old style Sevylor air mattress that inflates to about 5" thick. It packs kind of large but I get a great nights sleep.
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  #20  
Old 11 Oct 2008
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Thanks for nothing Dingo and PocketHead, really helpful stuff! Suggest you guys stick to subjects you actually know something about.
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  #21  
Old 11 Oct 2008
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I think there has been some very decent advice on here, I speak from experience also having broke my back (in 1974 and spent a year in a plaster bed to try to fix the bugger)and had a spinal fusion from the pelvis to about 6 inches up my spine meaning the area immeadiatly above the fusion has to take all the strain of flexing that would normally be spread over the larger lower and stronger vertabrae and pelvis (these are fused together - a real problem for the body to deal with)and associated muscle groups. Further to this I was later injured twice with two serious upper spine and neck injuries over the period of a year in 2002. As a result I have had physio,yoga,pilates and every other type of exercise and treatment to try and allieviate some of the problems associated with bad backs. We all have different tolerence to back pain and some have accute pain, some just have dull ache they think is pain (There is a difference believe me.) As I work as a stone wall builder lifting and moving dead weight - not good for backs and it involves a lot of bending and working in the cold I feel I have worked through the various ways of easing/avoiding back Pain.
The first Is Keep fit - no bellys you need strong lower stomach muscles and core muscles (crunches are not the way to go) Pilates/yoga or when your at home one of them rubber balls you sit on doing hip thrusting exercise - excellent for building the deep core muscles strengthens the support for your spine, Posture on and off the bike Think of a wire attached to the top of your head pulling up stand and walk tall with this in mind gets your posture good and helps lower and very much upper spine. When sitting on the bike dont allow yourself to sag keep the lower spine pushed forward and shoulders back, like they say try to adjust the bike to suit. When you stop for rests do a few spine stretches pulling your back straight/hanging from anything to stretch out the weight and some slow gentle twists and if its all getting to much stop and rest. The main thing is get advice as has been said from a specialist I rate yoga and pilates as the real leaders in this field. Medical people have widely varying views but rest in a bed is as bad as it gets your spine needs to be moving even very gently and slowly. Kidney belts do help but are more of a sticky plaster on the wound rather than treating the underlying cause. Keep fit very fit build up muscle strenght this will protect underlying weakness, get the ergonomics of the bike as right as you can and for overlanders this should be High on priority when looking at a bike. Or you could do it the way mentioned above just be well ard and ignore the pain -but then look forward to maybe driving a wheelchair in later life. Yor spine means everything to your whole body look after it. Bye the way I sleep very well when camping on a thermarest or my Exped downmat. The down mat is the better of the two bye a long way.
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  #22  
Old 12 Oct 2008
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Talking Ahhh Hornet my dear friend.

No maybe I don't know anything about bad backs? I have worked in the mining industry for over 20 years training on, repairing and operating heavy equipment so I have seen my share of people with bad backs and people who try and play the system. Been riding a bike since I was 10 as well so yes, have had my share of stiff and tight back muscles as well and have paid money to the local chiroprator.

The woman I was telling you about did have a bike accident in Meekathara 2 yrs ago and broke her back in 2 places! Now she has a smaller bike and is actually out there doing it! It is people like this that I take my hat off to not a bunch of people on here that do their 800 km days for the weekend or down to the local coffee shop for a Latte.

It's easy really! If riding a bike hurts your back, give it up!!! If you can put up with it then don't complain and enjoy it. If you need a kidney belt or a back brace then get one! But please don't use this forum as a place to winge and whine, I don't think it was set up for this?

Enjoy the ride guys.

Cheers
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  #23  
Old 12 Oct 2008
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Dingo, the forum is designed for intelligent conversation, you earlier remarks were certainly not that - your latest one shows a bit of promise though. If you have something intelligent to add to posts please do so, failing which keep your flippant comments to yourself.

PS - I did not whinge or whine, perhaps you should read my post again.
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  #24  
Old 12 Oct 2008
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Posture is all important. IF the bike is a sports bike ie not a fully sitting up riding position then lower back pain can be short hamstrings (the muscles up the backs of the upper legs). You should be riding with your back concave that is the lower back curved down with your belly pointing at the ground. The lower back hurts if the lower back curves UP. This happens if the hamstrings are too short. Go to a yoga teacher to learn how to stretch them-it's easy. But yoga postures and stretches should not be "taught" other than face to face and one to one or you could cause a strain. My doctor said I could only ride a sit upright bike. After three weeks I can do ride a Moto Guzzi Le Mans with clip ons. No problems. Take up yoga. You'll benefit. Linzi. Note, backs are complex and problems very varied!!!!
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  #25  
Old 13 Oct 2008
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Used to be a grave digger many moons ago. It made me very fit around the back and shoulders - looked a bit of a mutant actually, with my little legs - but it took a toll on my lower back that I hardly noticed at the time. Today, my back can now pop on a sneeze.

I did the yoga session at the Ripley HU meeting. All I can say is, it worked. I'm now on the lookout for classes, but nothing suitable yet.
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Last edited by teflon; 13 Oct 2008 at 15:56.
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  #26  
Old 13 Oct 2008
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Thanks for nothing Dingo and PocketHead, really helpful stuff!...
As a car driving, lazy old bastard, I found their comments very useful.
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Last edited by teflon; 13 Oct 2008 at 14:50. Reason: Spelt 'bastard' wrong.
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  #27  
Old 13 Oct 2008
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Hornet, your a kiwi you can't help it mate. I don't hold that against you though!

Anyone up for a quick ride down through Sumatra next week? Shipping on Monday after the Malay GP!

Cheers
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  #28  
Old 13 Oct 2008
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Yoga Classes

Hi Teflon, I'll check with an excellent yoga centre and ask if they recommend anyone in Salisbury. An Italian woman, family name Scaravelli, is credited as having offered the best therapeutic yoga. You've hit a gold vein if you find a teacher who trained under her but that's not likely. Next best is to find a teacher who's own teacher had learnt from her. I'll get back to you shortly. Linzi.
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  #29  
Old 17 Oct 2008
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Yoga

Hi Teflon, I spoke to my yoga teacher and he said, " I don't know anyone in Salisbury bu also it's not just Scaravelli teachers who can be excellent and it's even possible to find a poor Scaravelli teacher. Tell him to google for local teachers and see if the teacher asks probing questions about any injuries! Seek someone with a physiotherapy background possibly or massage therapy background. Nearest good teachers to him are Exeter and Totnes. I'll be teaching down there in a couple of weeks and ask for you". So, if I haven't left for warmer climes by then, then I should have a reply for you. Linzi.
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  #30  
Old 17 Oct 2008
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Thankyou Linzi. Was looking for a basic class, ideally within walking distance of Salisbury town centre. So far, everything is at an extortionate price - £295 for a yoga breathing! Everything else is a lengthy drive away.

The local leisure centre does a yoga/pilates class, which I think I'll go for. Don't know how much yet, but without all the bells and whistles, it should be reasonable.

I really appreciate your asking around.
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