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I haven't been everywhere...
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Camping in the Mexican desert



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  #1  
Old 19 Oct 2009
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Question Looking for some help in getting started

Hi, I'm a silly Australian, with no concept of border crossings, or driving through other countries, but am planning a trip from Chile or somewhere in the south, and riding north, I was wonderring a few things.

Should I get the bike here and set it up (have a farm and gear here, can test the bike and weld on any racks) and then send it over and ride away into the sunset (I'm sure it is more complex than that) or should I buy a bike over there, kit it up, then ride away into the sunset?

Also, should I take my Norton Commando? I have spent ages restoring its former beauty, but really don't want it to be taken off me by banditos? Was thinking of a Suzuki 400 motard bike and spraying it rattle-can black so as to look less desirable. (which I won't do to the Commando, it is my baby)

Also, I realise that a lot of you will reccomend a BMW or something like that, I have to say, that it just isn't possible, I'm too poor, and am going solo through rough areas, I'm not going to ride around on more money than a kid with an AK47 will ever see in his life.


Any thoughts/help/warnings would be much appreciated.
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Old 19 Oct 2009
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i just did alaska to ushuaia on a 2000 buck bike

just heading back to buenos aires now ,there are always plenty of bikes for sale in buenos aires that have been ridden down from the states ,you just change the title to your name and away you go ,most are all set up ready to go ,maybe some may need a little TLC but they are all cheap border crossing s are fairly straight forward ,there are plenty so you will get the hang of it,dont pay bribes and dont pay helpers oh yeah do plenty of hunting on here and ADV rider
dave
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Old 19 Oct 2009
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Talking Your trip in reverse!

That is weird, I'm thinking of starting as close as I can get to the antarctic and finishing inside the arctic circle in Alaska! Any hints on bikes? Have been talked out of the Commando!

I would like to do the trip without bribes and the like, but am a realist, so I will bribe the first cop who looks like he will cause me problems.

About the hunting, that sounds exactly like what I want to do, just got myself a new pigsticker, and have PALS all over my gear (ex-army disposals gear), what do I have to do about a rifle or something? I'm on a bit of a survivalist adventure, and would love to live off the land in a few areas?

Sounds like you had a blast on your trip, did you keep a journal or anything?
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Old 19 Oct 2009
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A KLR650 will do you well it is cheap and able. Never ride a bike you can not lose, too many things can go wrong some one stealing it is not near as a problem as dropping it or gust beating it to death both you will do.

Some cops will give you hard time and the fees will start at a few $100 and drop to $5 or 10 if you spend some time talking to them. Do not pay right up but do not spend 8Hr. to save $5.

Guns on a bike? Nope do not even try. Not a hand gun or a rifle or something... nothing. That kid with a AK will get real jumpy you do not want that (many use HK 91 or G3). And not legal for you to have anyway (most places) You do not want be looked at as a threat so no big knifes or swords. Not much use on a bike, a small knife a folding fishing pole will be a lot more useful. If you must go hunting get a gun there hunt and sell it back. Cheaper still just get your food from a shop.

Any bike over 250cc will be seen as a BIG bike there spray it all you want the people will still know it is a big bike. But mud is free and there is a lot of it. The threat of stealing is real but most of that is small stuff in a city just like back home.

Do not forget the Darien gap you will need to fly over it or put it on a boat and ship it.

If you can go to a HU meeting and ask Questions more info there than you will ever need.

There is thread about buying a bike in buenos aires and riding it from there. there is a big problems getting a bike in SA and riding off. there it is http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hub...-legally-31965

hope this helps.
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Old 19 Oct 2009
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Buying a new or used bike in Argentina as a Foreign Tourist

TotalTomination, here is a overview of the process for a foreign tourist (on a 3 month tourist card/visa) to purchase a new or used motorcycle that has Argentine plates and is legally registered in Argentina.

I am in total agreement with DLbiten comments regarding the size of the bike and about not carrying guns.

I agree that sifting through the multiple posts related to buying a bike in South America might leave one confused. Having lived in Central and South America for many years, I will answer as best I can. Here is what you have to know.

It is early morning October 8, 2009 in Buenos Aires, we are approaching spring time but there is still a slight nip in the air. Summer and vacations are November, December and January, very different from the northern hemisphere.

As one rides south in Argentina, it generally gets colder.

If your purchase of a motorcycle in South America is for the purpose of touring, please consider the climatic differences.

Yes, you can legally sell your Argentine registered motorcycle in Argentina. Selling in any other country would be a long expensive process and generally not worth the effort.

Buying new is easier and less risky than buying used. To buy a new motorcycle in Argentina as a foreign tourist.

Here is an overview of what you will need to do:

Secure a "domocillio" certificate issued by LOCAL Argentine police, you must go to the police station assigned to protect your neighborhood, (your hotel etc) in Argentina.

1. The domocillio costs about 10 pesos ($3 US) and is obtained by providing the police your ID (passport) or DNI and address. The next day, a police officer will hand deliver the stamped document to your residence, where you are staying in Argentina, pension, with a friend etc.

2. Take your passport. and domocillio to your assigned AFIP office, you will have to find out which office pertains to your residence address, and get a CDI which is a tax number for foreigners , not working in Argentina. This will take about 2 hours, faster if you go early. Cost approximately 10 argentine peso.

3. Investigate auto insurance, so after you purchase and your "Gestor" (one who transfers vehicle titles as a business) does the paperwork you can give the Vehicle ID and plate # to the insurance agency and you will be immediate covered, so you can drive your bike home. DO NOT DRIVE WITHOUT INSURANCE!

A foreign tourist can purchase a new or used motorcycle registered in Argentina, Chile and other South American countries, but legally and officially a foreign tourist cannot export, (cross the border) of either Argentina or Chile. I am currently working to have the law that restricts the travel of a foreign tourist riding his/her Argentine registered motorcycle reviewed and changed. You can help. Please see the last posts on my thread:

Buy new or used in Argentina and legally tour all of South America ( 1 2 3 ... Last Page) located and with a sticky, this regional forum.

As you will learn there is a way a foreign tourist can cross out of Argentina with his/her Argentine registered motorcycle, and that is to co-own the motorcycle with an Argentine or a permanent foreign resident of Argentina who has a DNI (National Identification Document) and lives in Argentina).

The Argentine or permanent foreign resident will have to accompany you to the border of Argentina, and "perhaps" secure a temporary export permit.

If you are buying used here are the documents the seller must provide:

In our continuing effort to bring the very latest and most accurate information to you regarding a foreign tourist buying and then selling a motorcycle/auto in Argentina and legally crossing the Argentine border for the purpose of touring other south American countries, we owe a great debt to Mariano of Motocare.com. Mariano sells and rents new and used motorcycles from his showroom/shop Motocare


Here is the list of documents needed from the owner of a used motorcycle.

1. Título de propiedad original: (Title)

2. Cédula verde original: (Green card, registration)

3. Formulario 08 o Contrato de Transferencia, firmado por el vendedor y, si es que el titular figura como casado en el titulo, entonces tambien por el cónyuge. Esta/s firmas certificadas por el Registro de Motovehiculos (aquel donde esta el legajo de la moto) o escribano publico: (No traslation for this but owner will know...it is a form to be signed.)

4. Verificacion Policial: ( Police check up for possible theft charges)

5. Informe de Dominio: (To check that the seller can legally sell the bike )

6. Estado de Deuda de Patentes, o libre deuda de Patentes: (Taxes up to date)

8. Libre deuda de Infracciones del Tránsito: ( No tickets or stolen vehicle reports)


Do not leave a deposit "reserva" for the bike unless you have a physical copy of each of these documents in hand , or are absolutely convinced missing documents are available and will be provided.

You can have the owner sign an agreement to legally sell the bike to you within the next week or return your deposit. The deposit will be no more than $20.00 US dollars.

As I have indicated on other threads, a foreign tourist can legally buy and sell a new or used moto or auto in Argentina, but can be very risky.

We are doing our best to eliminate any risk involved.

Our goal is to mark the path for those foreign tourists who want to fly to Buenos Aires, buy a new or used moto or auto, register it legally, buy appropriate insurance, tour other South America countries and then return to Argentina to sell or store the moto or auto. And, to do this as legally and as economically as possible.

We are testing the system today and tomorrow. Please post questions, comments and personal experiences on this thread.

There is an excellent description of buying a used motorcycle in Chile posted by lachy and found in this regional forum under:

"Steps to Buying a Used Bike in Santiago Chile"

A very similar post regarding buying used in Chile is found on my thread and and posted originally by jolaglabek.

I will leave it to others to respond to you regarding other South American countries.

Hope this helps and might I use your screen name to help convince Argentine legislature to change the law restricting the travel of foreign tourists on their Argentine registered motorcycles?

Eat, Drink and Be Careful xfiltrate

Last edited by xfiltrate : 1 Week Ago at 20:44.
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  #6  
Old 19 Oct 2009
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Can a Foreign Tourist buy a bike registered in (USA, EU, Britain, etc)?

TotalTomination, this short story is worth a read.

Perhaps those visiting this thread might wonder about the possibilities of selling a foreign registered (USA/EU/etc.) /motorcycle to another foreign tourist in Chile? Or Argentina?

I penned the following fictionalized story for another thread, and believe the information is valuable enough to be presented again here:

The topic here is, and I may be wrong, for I do have a propensity for staying off topic, IS IT POSSIBLE FOR A UNITED STATES registered motorcycle title to be legally transferred, if the motorcycle is in Chile or Argentina and the seller is a foreign tourist and the buyer is also a foreign tourist and both seller and buyer are in Chile or Argentina.

In the majority of States I researched, the "foreign" owner simply signs the back of the title or signs a specified title transfer form provided by the State where the motorcycle is registered, and here is the catch, in every State I researched....the seller's signature must be notarized by a certified notary of the State that issued the title, or be notarized by a certified notary of the State where the motorcycle is to be registered.

Whoa, cowboys and cowgirls there are several big cautions here. Please read on!

Example: PART ONE Sam, Joe and Barbara

Foreign motor tourist Sam has a beautiful BMW, purchased and paid for in Arizona, that he rode to Panama, and then had it flown to Santiago, Chile. He had planned to continue his tour of South American countries, but the collapse of the US economy precluded him having expected profits from the gradual sale of his stock portfolio and he found himself destitute, until he could get back to California and earn some money.

Destitute foreign motor tourist Sam meets wealthy foreign tourist Joe at an Ex Pat bar in Santiago. Sam, over a few s explains his troubles to his new friend Joe. Joe considers the matter and says "Sam, why don't you sell your BMW to me?"

Not wealthy by luck nor family fortune, but by his own intelligence and hard work, Joe begins considering the effort involved in transferring the BMW's Arizona title into his name, no, wait, he does not want an Arizona title, he wants to register the BMW in Colorado, where he lives most of the year.

"Ok, let's see the title , says Joe." He notices there are no liens (loans) on the bike and that indeed on reverse of the title are instructions for title transfer. Seems simple enough, Sam just needs to sign the BMW's Arizona title on the space provided and indicate the milage on the odometer, but wait, oh no, Sam's must sign in the presence of a State certified Notary Public.

Joe immediately considers the possibility of finding an Arizona certified Notary Public somewhere in Santiago, Chile, for he knows the State of Arizona will not release the Arizona title of the BMW unless Sam's signature was witnessed by a Notary Public.

Just by chance, slightly tipsy, but very attractive foreign tourist Barbara, had eyed handsome Joe through the front window of the bar as he backed in and dismounted his big BMW. She also noted that the BMW sported the familiar desert brown Arizona plate, and she was from Phoenix, Arizona.

Joe noticed Barbara eyeing Sam, before Joe even knew Barbara existed, and not one to miss an opportunity, even for a friend, Joe motioned the waiter to invite Barbara to his table for a drink. Barbara accepted the offer and immediately proclaimed to Joe and Sam, I am from Arizona too.

Joe, said "right, and I suppose you are a certified Notary Public as well." Barbara, a little taken back said, why yes, I work for a bank in Phoenix and I have my Notary stamp right here in my purse. To the astonishment of Joe and Sam, Barbara was a certified Notary Public of the State of Arizona.

The BMW is the last topic on Barbara's mind and Joe has an early business meeting, so Joe excuses himself, but not before inviting Sam and Barbara to dinner the following evening... and, now alone, Sam and Barbara begin by talking all things Arizona, then all about Joe's journey, the economy and about anything else that comes up, until the sun does come up.

When alone in his hotel room, Joe says to himself, "OK, I am in Chile. I am considering buying an expensive BMW that Sam had flown in from Panama. OK, customs here will have Sam listed on the temporary vehicle import permit, I will, have a notarized Arizona title with Sam's notarized signature indicating he has sold the BMW to me, and I suppose Sam will fly back to Arizona, maybe with Barbara and get back to work."

"I would like to ride the BMW immediately, but according to the temporary import permit issued by Chile, I am not authorized to ride it in Chile nor am I the owner of the BMW. What to do? What to do?"

"No, Sam would have to exit the bike from Chile. Of course I (Joe) would pay the air freight, to Colorado, but no, the bike will be registered in Sam's name when Denver customs clears the BMW from the airline, Sam would have to clear customs with the bike.

"This is becoming complicated! Perhaps I should reconsider my offer to buy Sam's BMW."

END PART ONE

Here are the original questions, found at the beginning of this thread that I am answering.

"How easy will it be to sell my bike down there? (South America)
What is the precedure for transfereing the tittle if it's US registered?
In the Central American countries there is such a high import tax you couldn't even give the bike away what about Argentina/Chile?"

PART TWO: SAM, JOE and BARBARA

Joe had selected a Chilean restaurant for the previous night's dinner invitation to the two Arizonans, Sam and Barbara . Joe was personal friends with the owner of the restaurant, who was also an attorney and worked as a criminal defense lawyer in Santiago.

When Joe arrived at the restaurant, Sam and Barbara were standing, helmets in hand, near the big BMW parked at the curb. Joe said, " I see you made it OK," looked at the bike and opened the restaurant door. All three were welcomed in and seated by Jose Luis, the owner of the restaurant.

Sam appeared a little stressed that the subject of Joe buying the BMW did not come up during dinner and finally asked, "were you serious when you offered to buy my bike?" Without losing a beat, Joe's auto response was, "guess it depends on how much it will cost me?"

Sam relaxed a little and honestly stated, the bike is equipped for touring and would sell easily in the States for $15,000 US, and here I have seen the same bike, not equipped for touring, for sale for $20,000 US.

"Wow, why the big difference?" Joe knew, but asked to find out how much Sam knew about selling a US registered bike in Chile. "Has something to do with an import tax imposed on foreign bikes, before they can be registered and then sold in Chile. I think" was Sam's honest answer.

"But!" Sam quickly added, "that has nothing to do with you buying my bike, because you don't intend on registering it in Chile, do you??? "No" if I buy it I plan to fly it to Colorado, that is if the price is right." "So?" "How much will she cost me?"

"Ok" we don't want to do anything illegal here, right?" "Right!" They both agree.

"How about $10,000 dollars, cash?" "And, you ride it to Colorado." Now, Joe was caught a bit off guard, he had not considered the possibility of riding from Chile to Colorado, and it sounded like a damn good idea. After all, his venture in Chile had been very profitable and for ten years he has wanted a real vacation....

"What a great idea. I buy your bike, then during the next 6 months I ride South and then Central America and on up to Colorado. I would love to do that. I had a Harley when I was younger."

"Is it possible?" asks Joe... "Of Course!" replies Sam, I have just finished a ride from Arizona to Panama, flew the bike here to Santiago, no problems." "I had planned to continue on to Argentina and several more South American Countries, but, you know the story." "Yeah, Yeah, tough luck, OK I'll give you $8,000.00 for the bike, if Barbara will notarize your signature on the back of the Arizona title, and she will confirm that with this title, once I reach Colorado, I will be able to register the bike in Colorado in my name."

Surprisingly quiet Barbara, now proclaims, "Yes Joe, with Sam's signature, and his Arizona drivers license number and US passport number as identification, I will notarize his signature, on the reverse of the Arizona title, as seller of the BMW to you." "This will, make the bike legally yours.... in Arizona, that is and you will be free to have this title transferred to a Colorado title in your name, according to the laws and regulations of Colorado." "I will also notarize your signature, on the back of the arizona title, as buyer, this is also required, so that Sam is released from any potential liability occurring in Arizona."

As an after thought, and looking directly at Joe, Babara adds.... "Sam gave me a ride, to the restaurant that is, and I can also attest that his bike runs great."

The following conversation goes like this.... "Wait, only $8,000.00?" I said $10,000.00." "Yes, I know but my offer is $8,000.00, take it or leave it."

After a moment of silence, Joe adds, look, I am at risk here... I have no idea how I am going to buy insurance, cross borders etc. etc. This is going to be a risky adventure for me, and I am offering, in part, to help you in a time of need." "Take it or leave it."

"OK, I'll take it, but you are getting a hell of a deal!"

END PART TWO: SAM, JOE AND BARBARA

PART THREE: SAM, JOE AND BARBARA

Once Sam agreed to accept Joe's offer, they both relaxed ... and Joe began to feel the slow rush of adrenalin that mysteriously begins to course through his body and mind at the beginning of a every new business venture or a big trip, or before sex.

Barbara sensing the moment, wondered silently about the odds defying flow of events that brought the three of them together. Had she not noticed Joe and the Arizona plates on his bike as he parked in front of a bar in Santiago, Chile, this might not be happening. At the bank where she worked in Phoenix, Arizona she had often notarized vehicle title transfers and knew that she was needed. Well, anyway, a certified notary was needed, needed to identify Sam with two forms of signed picture ID, observe him sign as the seller on the back of the BMWs Arizona title, verify his signature against his signatures on the picture IDs and then affix her notary seal and signature. She knew little , and cared less about title transfers beyond notarizing the signature of the seller.

Barbara's attention returned to Joe as he was explaining to Sam the location of the Santiago American Express office where at 11 the next morning, he would give Sam the $8,000 dollars and then, with Barbara as Notary, Sam could sign the back of Arizona title of the BMW as seller.

Joe wanted a closer look at the BMW and needed some time to reflect upon his decision to buy, so he casually mentioned that it was late and he wanted to spend time with his good friend Jose Louis, attorney and owner of the restaurant. Once out of the restaurant Sam swung effortlessly onto the comfortable seat of the bike, and waited until Barbara had put on her helmet and carefully pinioned behind him. Only then did he don his own helmet and touch the starter button. As expected the big BMW purred to life and they were off.

As he headed back to his table, and his laptop, he caught Jose Luis off guard by asking if there was WI-FI.

"Amigo, you think this is some third world country?" "Absolutamente, we have WI FI" "Why?"

"Well, I just want to take a look at the State of Arizona Motor Vehicles web site."

"You going to Arizona?"

"No, no, tomorrow I am going to buy that BMW that those two kids just rode out a here."

"You are going to do WHAT!!!"

"Buy the bike, buy the bike, and then ride it back to Colorado." Haven't you been telling me for years I work too hard and should take a long vacation?"

"Amigo, No sé nada about the Arizona Motor Vehicle regulations but, you buy that Arizona bike in Chile and instead of a vacation you might end up in a very uncomfortable jail cell."

"What?"

"You are on the right track, take a look at the Arizona Department of transportation web site while I close up the restaurant and then we will talk."

The following was copied from:

Arizona Department of Transportation

Soon after loading the ADOT web site, Joe knew he had made a very bad decision.

Seller

When a vehicle is sold (or otherwise transferred) you, the seller, should:

Sign off the back of the title and have your signature notarized.
Give the title to the buyer with any lien release, if applicable.
Complete a sold notice online, or on the back of the vehicle registration.
Remove and retain the license plate, instead of leaving the plate on the vehicle. The plate belongs to you, the vehicle owner not the vehicle. You can later transfer the plate to another vehicle that you register.
Request a refund (see Refunds below). –or–
Transfer the plate credit to another vehicle owned (see Credit For Fees below).

Buyer

Upon sale or transfer of a vehicle, the registration for that vehicle is no longer valid. The buyer must visit any MVD or authorized Third Party office to transfer the plate and register the vehicle.

If it is necessary to drive the vehicle to complete this transaction, the buyer must obtain a Restricted Use 3-Day Permit, for private sales, or a Temporary Registration Plate, for vehicles purchased from a licensed dealer


"Amigo, you learn anything from the web site?"

"Yeah, looks like if I buy the bike, the license plate is not included, and the registration no longer legal until I visit the motor vehicles department and transfer the title."

"What does it say about "INSURANCE?" As your friend and an attorney, I am not going to allow you to ride that bike anywhere with out insurance."

"No problem José Luis, I'll buy insurance here."

"Es possible," " I am sure there are more than one insurance company in Santiago, that will sell you insurance, but the minute you have an accident, damage something, or kill someone with that bike, an attorney representing the insurance company, will look at the copy of the title you submitted and immediately declare that you fraudulently purchased insurance for a bike that you do not hold title to." "You, might be able to buy insurance, but you will have no coverage."


"José Luis, from what I just read.... I might have another "problema." "What license plate number will appear on the insurance card?" "Sam is required to remove the plate." "And, how will I ride from Chile to Colorado without a license plate."

"You won't." "Matter of fact you won't get out of Chile on that bike."

"Why not?"

"Because... when your friend collected his bike from the "aduana" at the airport, he was issued what is called a Temporary Vehicle Import Permit" (TVIP) which clearly states that the "vehicle" or "motorcycle" is not to be sold in Chile, therefore TVIPs are non transferrable." "And, in order to exit Chile you must turn in the TVIP, show the title and possibly submit the bike to an inspection of the vin #, that hopefully, matches the vin # on the title."

"For each border between here and Colorado you cross, you will be required to show title to obtain a TVIP and you might have to prove you have insurance, you might not, but you might." "When you cannot ride further north, you will have to ship or fly the bike to Panama and without a proper title, I doubt any reputable shipper will carry a bike, with a questionable title, as cargo."

"Look Joe, you need to back out of this deal."

"I am to meet those kids at American Express in the morning." I like them both, they just met and this was not a set up. This I know for sure. Perhaps I could lend Sam a couple grand, if he had the money he would ride the bike back to Arizona himself."

"Joe I'll be there for you in the morning, now go get some sleep."

The next morning Joe withdrew $2,000.00 dollars on his American Express card and while he waited in the vip lounge of American Express, he penned an agreement to repay $2,000.00 to be signed by Sam. When José Louis arrived he looked confident, and as was customary he handed his friend Joe a Cuban cigar.

From the vip lounge both men saw Sam and Barbara arrive on the BMW. Barbara took Sam's arm as they approached the upscale building. They burst into the lounge and after Barbara kissed both men on the cheek, she proclaimed, "we have some good news." This obviously positive spin got Joe's attention.

"Tell them Sam." "Gentlemen, it seems as if Barbara was temporarily laid off from the bank in Phoenix, and has unemployment insurance for six months. She, has agreed to finance our trip back to Arizona! She will lend me the money for my share of the expenses, and of course, I provide a ride home for her." "And, she was wise enough to buy a refundable airline ticket."

"Wow, that's good news!" Joe winked at José Luis, and said, you know I like you kids, I am happy for you, a bit envious, but certain you will have a great ride home."

"All of this is so exciting." "I like Sam, and I believe this journey, through foreign lands, is just the way to get to know him better." Can you believe, he is a customer at the bank where I work!" "This was meant to be!"

"Well, you two have many kilometers to ride, be good to each other, and with that Joe began to unwrap the Cuban cigar." As the two friends watched the BMW disappear into traffic and the smoke of 2 Cuban cigars, they remembered why they liked each other.

END PART THREE

Multiple choice test soon.

Eat, Drink and Be Careful xfiltrate
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  #7  
Old 22 Oct 2009
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Talking Your trip in reverse!

That is weird, I'm thinking of starting as close as I can get to the antarctic and finishing inside the arctic circle in Alaska! Any hints on bikes? Have been talked out of the Commando!

I would like to do the trip without bribes and the like, but am a realist, so I will bribe the first cop who looks like he will cause me problems.

About the hunting, that sounds exactly like what I want to do, just got myself a new pigsticker, and have PALS all over my gear (ex-army disposals gear), what do I have to do about a rifle or something? I'm on a bit of a survivalist adventure, and would love to live off the land in a few areas?

Sounds like you had a blast on your trip, did you keep a journal or anything?
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Old 22 Oct 2009
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Originally Posted by TotalTomination View Post
That is weird, I'm thinking of starting as close as I can get to the antarctic and finishing inside the arctic circle in Alaska! Any hints on bikes? Have been talked out of the Commando!

I would like to do the trip without bribes and the like, but am a realist, so I will bribe the first cop who looks like he will cause me problems.

About the hunting, that sounds exactly like what I want to do, just got myself a new pigsticker, and have PALS all over my gear (ex-army disposals gear), what do I have to do about a rifle or something? I'm on a bit of a survivalist adventure, and would love to live off the land in a few areas?

Sounds like you had a blast on your trip, did you keep a journal or anything?

Erhm , I think the canoeguy meant "hunt " for a bike .

As a fellow Commando owner , I agree - leave it at home ,unless you want to travel just in the States and Canada .

Buy a cheap bike that you don't mind losing .
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  #9  
Old 23 Oct 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TotalTomination View Post
Hi, I'm a silly Australian, with no concept of border crossings, or driving through other countries, but am planning a trip from Chile or somewhere in the south, and riding north, I was wonderring a few things.

Should I get the bike here and set it up (have a farm and gear here, can test the bike and weld on any racks) and then send it over and ride away into the sunset (I'm sure it is more complex than that) or should I buy a bike over there, kit it up, then ride away into the sunset?

Also, should I take my Norton Commando? I have spent ages restoring its former beauty, but really don't want it to be taken off me by banditos? Was thinking of a Suzuki 400 motard bike and spraying it rattle-can black so as to look less desirable. (which I won't do to the Commando, it is my baby)

Also, I realise that a lot of you will reccomend a BMW or something like that, I have to say, that it just isn't possible, I'm too poor, and am going solo through rough areas, I'm not going to ride around on more money than a kid with an AK47 will ever see in his life.
It's always best to prep your bike at home. You have a chance to figure out what works and what doesn't. Trying to find and buy the right bike in a foreign country, ensure maintenance is up to snuff and then kit it out properly puts you at a distinct disadvantage right from the start.

A 400cc Suzuki motard? How about a Suzuki DR650. Cheap (relatively), simple, reliable and more capable on dirt than a motard. Or as DLBiten suggested a KLR 650. I like the DR quite a bit better but either is fine.

Don't worry about "banditos" or spray-painting a bike. Take common sense precautions with your possessions and person of course but travel in Chile and Argentina presents no significant security risk at all. Good luck...
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  #10  
Old 24 Oct 2009
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Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Posts: 947
Some thoughts regarding buying or shipping... and an idea

Hey Dave, thecanoeguy it was fun meeting and spending time with you. How did you like Marianne??? She was/is a writer/rider for BIKE magazine and a real looker,isn't she, as in WOW. She is an exceptional young woman, next, she will be doing a South American article and more for a well known adventure motorcycle tour company. OK, enough dribble... I feel lucky to know her.

I have the hardware for the crate at my place , call me when you are going to pick up the crate and I will meet you at my parking.

VERY IMPORTANT

I am obligated to respond to your post this thread. Please read my story of Sam , Joe and Barbara earlier this thread regarding transfer of title for a foreign (USA, EU, Austrailia, British etc) bike from one foreign tourist to another while in Chile or Argentina.

As you see by my fictionalized account of Sam, Joe and Barbara..the situation in Chile and Argentina is not at all like you described. "you just change the title to your name and away you go" Where did you get that idea anyway? What you suggest is far, far from realities encountered in Argentina and Chile.

To those posting questions regarding buying in Argentina and Chile .... perhaps you can find answers on existing threads and post additional questions there. When you post on any thread, it will go to the top of the postings and everyone will see it as if it were a new thread.

Just an idea, I have no authority here, but, I can make logical suggestions.

By reviewing the older threads, one can find the answers to just about every question found here. Yes, some might be a bit dated, so look to the abundant recent posts... Just an idea to help collect data on one or two threads rather than continually starting new threads on existing (previously posted) topics.

I urge anyone considering buying a bike in Argentina or Chile to carefully read my earlier posts on this thread. and all the recent posts by others, many of whom have actual on the ground experience.

As you will see by researching other posts this topic there has been posted some very misleading information while some of the misinformation has been corrected, ask again important questions and others will reply. Keep asking, get all of the different opinions and decide which seems right.

Thanks, and I will be more than happy to document each of the problems discussed in the Sam, Joe and Barbara story posted here.... I really did do extensive research on the questions asked here..

xfiltrate Eat, Drink and Be Careful
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  #11  
Old 24 Oct 2009
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Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: gold coast australia
Posts: 20
same sth amrica

I am doing exactly the same trip and am sitting ehre organising jsut that
am going on a Suzuki dr 650.
trying to organize the panniers and camping gear
then will need ot sort out how to ship ot etc
i am at the gold coast if you want to chat sometime
i travel alot in weird and wonderful places but never before on a bike
gjw





Quote:
Originally Posted by TotalTomination View Post
That is weird, I'm thinking of starting as close as I can get to the antarctic and finishing inside the arctic circle in Alaska! Any hints on bikes? Have been talked out of the Commando!

I would like to do the trip without bribes and the like, but am a realist, so I will bribe the first cop who looks like he will cause me problems.

About the hunting, that sounds exactly like what I want to do, just got myself a new pigsticker, and have PALS all over my gear (ex-army disposals gear), what do I have to do about a rifle or something? I'm on a bit of a survivalist adventure, and would love to live off the land in a few areas?

Sounds like you had a blast on your trip, did you keep a journal or anything?
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  #12  
Old 25 Oct 2009
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Location: Australia
Posts: 6
Thumbs up Good way to keep out spam.

Need to make one more post so I can send PMs.
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  #13  
Old 25 Oct 2009
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Location: Australia
Posts: 6
Thumbs up Getting real...

I am pretty sold on the Dr650. Air cooled means one less thing to go wrong. Will set it up at home just so I can fit it up, run it in and really work the oily bits over.

Have to install a windshield though.

Are there any must see destinations along the route? (I realize it is a long one, with a lot of stuff in the middle, but I am thinking along the lines of amazing rides + history.)
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  #14  
Old 25 Oct 2009
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Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Medellin, Colombia
Posts: 212
2 travel DR650 for sale in Colombia

Hi guys

I have two Australian guys visit me here in Colombia, who both want to sell their DR650, both all set up for travel and registered in California, so easy to change ownership.

Pete left his bike here in my storage and the other will be available as soon as Owen finishes his trip in a month or so.

If you're interested then I can PM you their email addresses...
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  #15  
Old 27 Oct 2009
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Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: On the road, Homeward bound :-(
Posts: 127
Insurance

Hi exfiltrate,
I was wondering if maybe you could save us a bit of time and energy and furnish us with a bit of info.
We arrived in BA on Sunday 25th Oct and are waiting for our bike to arrive somewhere near the 2nd Nov. Reading your posts it seems like it's not a very good idea to be without insurance. Would you maybe have any recommendation/contact that we could use to get a cheap reliable insurance sorted while we are waiting.
Many Thanks
Kev & Lorraine
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