Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Ride Tales, Trip Reports and Stories > Ride Tales
Ride Tales Post your ride reports for a weekend ride or around the world. Please make the first words of the title WHERE the ride is. Please do NOT just post a link to your site. For a link, see Get a Link.
Photo by George Guille, It's going to be a long 300km... Bolivian Amazon

I haven't been everywhere...
but it's on my list!


Photo by George Guille
It's going to be a long 300km...
Bolivian Amazon



Like Tree16Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #46  
Old 24 Mar 2014
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 3
copy....


assuming your std gearing is 13 -47

criky you must be ringing the little bangers neck!! 120k,,,,,,,



I am currently setting said machine up

have fitted 14 c/shaft ....done some sea trials..

and its still appears to lug bike ,, up some pretty extreme hill climbs with kit ,,

,without to much clutch modulation...



heated grips and some led spots ...bar risers.

got some old ktm hard luggage off my 625 ,,fits snug



sacrebleu


less is more...........!
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 14 Apr 2014
TechnomadicJim's Avatar
Gold Member
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailcutter View Post
copy....

assuming your std gearing is 13 -47

criky you must be ringing the little bangers neck!! 120k,,,,,,,

I am currently setting said machine up
have fitted 14 c/shaft ....done some sea trials..
and its still appears to lug bike ,, up some pretty extreme hill climbs with kit ,,
,without to much clutch modulation...

heated grips and some led spots ...bar risers.
got some old ktm hard luggage off my 625 ,,fits snug

sacrebleu

less is more...........!
I think so yes. I rarely ride flat out to be honest. Especially here in Malawi where the speed limit is 80 kmp/h. It certainly has some grunt on the hills. Heated grips you say, very posh! heh. I'm using Kriega soft luggage and I'm very happy with it. Good kit.

Post a pic if you can. I'm curious

on with the next installment :

Here's a picture of my camp at croc valley just before packing up. I really like it when there is a thatched area I can just string my hammock under. All the better if it has power, water and a bench like here.



I set off around 10am towards Chipata. Fortunately their were no crazy machete wielding drunks on the road today. I did come across an amusing "shopping center" which I emailed to my brother who's having a baby. He and his wife found it hilarious :



I forgot to mention in my last report but whilst I was on the old petauke road I hit a rock which pinged off one of my side sand springs into the bush. I spotted a workshop in Chipata run by an organisation called riders.org so I popped in to see if they could help. One of these two gentlemen sourced me a new one in 20 minutes flat and even installed it all for 15 kwatcha. Very nice guys indeed!



I also forgot to mention that whilst on the old petauke road I met a retired British policeman called Steve who was off to collect his canoe. He said to pop by his place on my way back for a which I did. He and his wife Anna run a Wildlife Education Trust called Chipembele just off old petauke road. Steve showed me round their impressive place which includes a pet Hippo called Douglas, a rescue monkey called Doreen and a few other animals. Steve also showed me his canoe which had a hole in it. He explained he was on a 12 day trip along the upper luangwa river when all of a sudden a crocodile grabbed the back of his canoe and tried to shake him out. Steve then said everything went in slow motion as he lent forward, grabbed his hand gun and turned around to fire two warning shots in to the water. The crocodile then slid back into the river. Pretty scary stuff. He said another canoeist had a similar experience but without a gun and he abandoned his trip soon after. I imagine the constant worry of capsizing it pretty nerve wrecking.

Anyway, after having my spring fixed and grabbing a burger in the Chipata Spurs I headed to the border to cross into Malawi. On the way I passed the usual queue of trucks parked up waiting to cross in.



The crossing went pretty smooth and took about an hour. Nobody was in a hurry and I got my first taste of the Malawian's laid back nature. The visa was free and as usual the Temporary permit was free. I did have to pay 5000 MWK (about 11 USD) road fee. I also had to buy insurance for 30 days which was available 100 meters down the road and cost about 8 USD. Pretty cheap crossing all in all! It rained heavily whilst I was sorting everything out but fortunately stopped on my way out. Below is a picture of the river coming down the road.



No welcome sign in Malawi either. Just this sign informing me of the speed limits. It will have to do! Interestingly the maximum speed limit is 80 km/h which is perfect for me with my top speed of around 95 km/h.*



I set off for Lilongwe and took a dorm bed at Mabuya Camp*for $10 per night. I bought some supplies from the local supermarkets and filled both my tanks with petrol as I wasn't sure how many stations I would find here in Malawi. I also picked up an extra 1.5 liters of oil from the Game store and changed my oil that night. The next morning I headed to an Indian barbers for a much needed haircut and shave. It was the full works including head message and cut throat razor. In my experience having haircuts and shaves around the world the Indians always do the best job. Later that day two Italian bikers called Andrea and Umberto turned up at*Mabuya. They had*driven down from Italy. Nice guys!

Not wanting to dwell too long in he capital I headed north to Mzuzu along the hill roads and was very glad I had the extra fuel as the only pump on the way was broken. I spent the night at the*MzooZooZoo*which to be honest is in dire need of renovation but the people made up for it with interesting conversation that night by the fire. Not wanting to waste time I topped up my fuel and headed north again the next day.



Finally I get my first view of Lake Malawi as I come over a hill :



I drove straight past the turning to Livingstonia the first time. Considering it's a fairly famous town I didn't expect the turn off to look like this.



The ascent is about 15 bends like this which is great fun on the bike. Most of the road is gravel but some of the steeper corners have been sealed.



I made it up to the top and decided to stay at The Mushroom Farm which is now owned and run by an american called Cameron. The views from up here are outstanding and I decided the only way to go was with my hammock and tarp setup. Here's my setup and the view I woke up to :



A view of some of the small villages below :



Cameron's new puppy "Chapati" :

__________________
Live Ride Report : Live GPS Tracking
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 14 Apr 2014
TechnomadicJim's Avatar
Gold Member
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 52
The next morning I headed up into Livingstonia itself. Its a very strange to see all these old colonial buildings so far from civilisation. I grabbed a tea from the local coffee shop and chatted a bit with the very friendly locals.



Here's the very quiet town center.



Next I headed into the Stonehouse Museum which is probably the smallest museum I have visited on my trip so far. Entry was 500 MWK with a 200 MWK supplement for photos.



The museum was pretty crap to be honest but I did come across this gem which made it worth all it :



Here's the pretty impressive church. I can't imagine how hard it was to build all this in such a remote place.



I ate some samosas for lunch at the Livingstonia Lodge which was surprisingly good. On my way back down I visited the Manchewe falls. I took a guide for 200 MWK on the recommendation of a local who turned out to be drunk on sachets. These sachets sell for about 60 MWK (0.15 USD) for 100 ml of hard liquor :



Here's the view :



Quite a drop too when you stand above it. I didn't want to get too close especially with the drunk kid nearby.



I was a bit disappointed with my young drunk guide but paid him anyway and decided to visit the cave behind the falls with a group of 5 boys who spoke much better English and weren't drunk. We had some interesting conversation about BK (Bible Knowledge). They were quite surprised when I told them of that Christianity wasn't as popular in Europe as it was here in Africa. I then tried to explain why I believed in evolution rather than creationism. To be fair they listened and seemed interested enough. I do find it a bit ironic that after all the missionary work done by Europeans in Africa in the past that we no longer believe so much any more.



Here is the cave behind the waterfall. Apparently the locals used to hide here from the slavers when they came to town.



I paid the boys 100 MWK each for their time which worked out at about 1 USD in total for all 5. It had been raining a little and on my return to the bike the local drunk who had recommended the drunk kid had covered my bike in plastic. He was demanding 200 MWK for guarding my bike. I was not impressed as I had told him when I left that my bike didn't need looking after. We had a "debate" for about 15 minutes which attracted a few locals who were curious what the muzungu was up to. I offered him 50 MWK which to be honest was more of an insult than anything. Of course he didn't accept it. I made a few digs that while he's out drinking his sachets all day I was working hard back in the UK to afford this trip and I'm not going to waste my money having my bike guarded by drunks. In the end I just left giving him nothing with most of the locals laughing at the drunk who made an empty threat that we would "meet again". meh, whatever. I don't like confrontations like this but after a while you get tired of it all and decide to stick to your principles and argue it through. In all honesty though its not worth the hassle and headache for 200 MWK (less than half a dollar).

Here's a nice view of a small homestead to lighten the mood



After spending two night at the Mushroom Farm I headed back down the twisty path to the main road. Cameron the owner was looking rough and confessed he had just tested positive for malaria. A sign of things to come :/

Here's a good example of the road from above :



On my way back to Mzuzu I took this panoramic on my phone. It's a beautiful drive with the smell of the tobacco fields as you drive by.



I popped into the Mzuzu Zoo again to say hi to Graham, Chad and Jim and had a BLT lunch. I then headed down to Nkhata bay. I checked out the Butterfly Space but it was a run down and dilapidated place. When looking around I got hassled by a couple of artists to check out their work. Not a place I wanted to stay if I could avoid it. Next I checked Mayoka Village which was much better. This is certainly a place where you could get stuck for a while!

Me, Jimmy (also from the UK) and Haroula from Canada took a local boat out for a spin (quite literally). Despite me looking like i was in control these things take some controlling and tend to spin on the slightest over paddling or wave. Good fun though.



Not the most comfortable either. You end up with a dead leg after not too long.



Every Tuesday at Mayoka they offer a free boat trip which is a nice touch. First we fed the fish eagles. I got these shots with burst mode on the GoPro.



That's Gill right below the bird. You'll remember he's on the GS1200 and we spent a few days camping on the Kariba in Zambia. I think this shot is pretty cool.



Next we did a rock jump where some local boys were hanging out. Really nice to meet some local kids who don't want pens or money and are just happy to have a laugh with you.



On my Facebook page there was some debate about whether I had the balls to jump. Just so that doesn't happen here's the proof up front



Lastly we landed on the beach of a small fishing village. This is everyone banding together to pull the net in. I was interested to the result of all this effort. Unbelievably there were only 15 or so tiny fish! You can see in the distance what looks like smoke. Its actually a swarm of small flying ants. When they come ashore the locals catch them and make them into burgers (I'm not joking!).



Life was very relaxed at Mayoka and time flies easily. I decided though that I needed to get move on so I took the Ilala ferry up to Ruarwe. There's a lodge up there called Zulunkhuni River Lodge run by Charlie and Rosa who I met at the Muzuzu Zoo. The ferry took about 6 hours. Two of which were spent uploading maize meal to Usisya on the way. 2nd class cost 5200 MWK and was comfortable enough.



Here's Ruware's beach :



We were met by Charlie on a smaller boat and stopped to collect some luggage before heading to the lodge. This picture really shows the excitement and chaos of the twice a week arrival of the Ilala ferry.



The lodge has a waterfall of ice cold water right next to it and a nice swim and a jump off some of the rocks there was an enjoyable end to the day. The next morning I woke up with a bit of a headache which was not normal for me. I never get headaches. I mentioned this to Charlie and he recommended I take a Malaria test just in case. I haven't taken any anti-malerials on this trip and suspected at some point I may get malaria. That time was now.



Two lines for positive. Unfortunately I had left the treatment I had bought back in Nkhata bay with the rest of my main luggage. Charlie had some treatment at the lodge which was lucky. It was actually a child dosage and it was out of date too. I started the treatment immediately and took it easy for the rest of the day. I started to feel worse as the day went on and after managing to get to sleep that night I woke at about 4am with a bad fever and was vomiting. I felt really rough and was up for a couple of hours. I managed to fall back to sleep and spent the next day taking it easy again. I didn't know what to expect and didn't feel too comfortable being 6 hours by a once a week boat from civilisation. What if I got really bad ? The Ilala came back in the opposite direction the next day so I decided to take it despite feeling a bit rough.

The journey wasn't too bad and the treatment seemed to be working well. I had also stopped taking any paracetamol after I read it can prolong the recovery time. I did have an interesting conversation on the way back with a gentleman named George who shouted everything he said so that everybody in 2nd class could hear. He also occasionally spat in my face as he spoke. He didn't seem to mind too much that I had malaria and had his conversation anyway. I was sweating a lot by this point with the effort of remaining politely interested in the conversation. Fortunately after about 20 minutes he moved on to shout and spit at someone else. He was a nice friendly guy but just difficult to deal with at that time with the malaria.

I had some friends with me throughout which was great. Haroula from Canada looked out for me which was much appreciated. Also Julia and Alex from South Africa were with us at the lodge. I actually met them on the way down from Livingstonia (they were walking up). I spent a few more nights at Mayoka village recovering during which there was some really heavy rain. So heavy it caused a mud slide which took out the bar and part of the seating area :



I'm becoming more and more conscious that my trip is going to end. I'm over two thirds through now and really need to get a move on towards cape town. There's so much to see on the way and I only have 10 weeks left and that includes the time I will need to sell the bike.

My front tire was a little flat and there's not one electric air compressor in Nkhata bay. This lad used his bike pump and the promise of 300 MWK to sort it out.



I paid my bill said my goodbyes and headed south down the lake side road towards Lilongwe. After about 300 km's I reached Nkhotakota. I rocked up at a place called fish eagle bay. For 4000 MWK i strung my hammock up under some thatching right on the beach. The food there was excellent and I had some perfectly cooked fish and rice and settled in for the night.



It was incredibly windy that night and I ended up re-orientating the hammock so it faced the wind head on instead of side on. Made for a much more comfortable nights sleep. I then set off for Lilongwe and made it in time for lunch at Chipiku supermarket using my bike as a table I ate outside the supermarket for about 1000 MWK. I then checked into Mabuya Camp like before and took a dorm bed.

This morning I drove to the Mozambican embassy to apply for a visa but was told to come back tomorrow. My plan is to try for the visa tomorrow and if its available the next day I will stay. Otherwise I will head to Monkey Bay and stay for a couple of nights. I only have 9 days left on my visa so I have to be careful. I may try and get the bike serviced in Blantyre. They also have an High Commission there where I can try for the visa again if I need to. I can probably get the visa on the border but I would feel better having it in advance just in case but I'm not waiting around for it. If it takes too long I will just try for it on the border.

I plan on crossing over at Zobue and heading to Tete. Next I'm going to make my was down to Vilanculos via Chimoio. I may only spend two weeks in Mozambique as I know there's a lot to see still in South Africa.
__________________
Live Ride Report : Live GPS Tracking
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 16 Apr 2014
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 3
heated grips ,,"I say"

minus 7 = "practicle"

yes ,,will post some piks when the sled ,, is complete,,

will be a fews mths,, tho ,,

I,m off plodding around Vietnam on scooter,,


cheers.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 7 May 2014
TechnomadicJim's Avatar
Gold Member
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 52
After unsuccessfully obtaining a visa for Mozambique I decided to head down to Cape Maclear. It was only about 300 km's and the route across the hills is a particularly nice ride. Lots of twisty roads and amazing views. I got some great video on this drive too.



There's so little traffic on the Malawian roads I decided to pose for a photo to take a break.



I arrived at Cape Maclear and on a recommendation decided to stay at Fat Monkeys. Its a really nice, well run place with dorms literally next to the beach. I hung out with two Scottish guys for a couple of days and just chilled.



Next I headed south again to*Liwonde National Park and stayed at Liwonde Safari Camp. I went on a boat safari but it wasn't that great. I saw 3 elephants from a distance and a few hippos. Perhaps it was the wrong time of year or something. I also think I was spoiled by the excellent safaris I did in Zambia. I also found the prices at the safari camp to be quite expensive too. Dinner was $15 for a buffet with no other options. Here's my hammock camp.



Being conscious of my time running out (only 2 months left!) I headed south again to Zomba and checked into Pakachere Backpackers. It's a very well run place that seems mostly setup for volunteering but did me fine. I was feeling quite ill with a bad stomach when I arrived so slept for most of the afternoon and then chilled out the following day to get try and improve.*

Feeling a bit better I left my stuff at the backpackers and drove up to the Sunbird Hotel on the Zomba plateau and had a cup of tea (very British of me). The drive up was excellent and I heard that the hiking was good up there so I drove towards the waterfall thinking I might just hike up and see it. To my delight there was a full on 4x4 trail in a loop around the plateau with stunning view points. That's Mount Mulanje you can see in the distance with Zomba city in the foreground.





About half way round the loop is Chingwes hole which is a deep cave system where apparently the local chief used to throw lepers and mad men.



Move impressive in my opinion is the view from there.





The road was pretty crap but easily handled by my trusty CTX 200.



I was really happy to have had a surprise few hours driving round the plateau and really recommend it to any other bikers heading up to Malawi.

Next I drove to Blantyre and checked into Doogles Lodge. I only had two days left on my Malawian visa so I didn't bother trying to apply for a Visa and went straight to the Honda dealership the next morning. Fortunately the guys managed to fit me in and do a same day service for the 20,000 km's. Whilst in the showroom *i noticed they were also sending a brand of bike simply called "Tough". The following was written on the tank! "Read Owaner smanual carefully before driving"



Later that evening I went out to dinner with some volunteers. Malawi is FULL of "volunteers" by the way. I didn't actually meet that many travelers / backpackers whilst in Malawi. We walked to a nice Indian restaurant in town and had a good meal. I brought up that we should get a taxi back as it was late but the volunteers brushed off my suggestion despite me insisting it was a dangerous move. On the way back I was proved right when a guy cut the bag strap from one of their bags and ran off with her camera, phone and purse. The camera's photos hadn't been backed up either. The local's who saw it all happen asked what the hell we were thinking walking around at night especially in that area. I resisted the obvious "i told you so!" but it was definitely a wake up call for them.

I got up fairly early on the last day of my Malawian visa and headed off for the Zobue border. I was following my GPS but forgot to double check the route (it sometimes sends me in odd directions because i tell it to choose the shortest route). It turns out I was being routed a more direct route which I realised when I was sent down this path. Fortunately I was only 20 km's off track and corrected myself.



The whole way to the border I was worrying about having not got my Visa in advance like most people do. The manager at Doogles even doubted they would issue me one there. Leaving Malawi was easy and the staff were very efficient and speedy. I drove the few kilometers to the town of Zobue and was swamped by "help". Whilst collecting the necessary forms I noticed a lot of cash being passed around inside passports and being shoved under the desk which didn't give me much confidence in the process. I asked for the visa application form and he gave it to me which was a relief. It took about an hour of messing about but I managed to get the visa for*
$75. I had my photo and finger prints taken! I also paid $30 for "insurance" which included the temporary import permit. I think this was too high for bike insurance but the "help" already filled out all my forms and had them processed so I just paid it and was relieved to have made it through.

Welcome to Mozambique! My 7th sticker on the bike.



The roads started out generally quite good. The problem was being constantly run off the road by trucks overtaking each other and not caring if there was any oncoming traffic, especially a motorbike!



I arrived in Tete and found it difficult to find any accomodation. I also couldn't locate a Vodacom office so I could get my sim card and data plan setup. I did notice some signs to a camp site and followed them instead. The campsite was called "Jesus E Born" and was essentially some family's small plot next to the Zambezi river. I paid 200 Mets for the night and had a bucket shower in the evening as the shower was broken. I later found out that this camp site used to owned by some sort of religious man (hence the name) but was sold and now not very trust worthy. Apparently some dutch campers had their tents slashed and stuff stolen in the night. Security was pretty non existence there and there was not much of a perimeter fence. This is why sleeping in a hammock is nice... I can keep an eye on all my stuff beside me with just a glance.



Here's the view of the bridge and Tete as the sun was going down.



The next morning I got up early and set off for Chimoio. It was a long drive and mostly uneventful apart from being run off the road by the odd truck just to keep me on my toes. After arriving in Chimoio i found a Vodacom shop and got my sim and data plan. This mean't I could then look up where the Pink Papaya Backpackers was located so I could check in! Having the internet on the go is such a useful thing its one of the first things I try and organise when I enter a country. The Pink Papaya is a nice homely hostel run by a German called Anya who is very helpful and full of local knowledge. She recommended I go on a day trip around Lake Chicamba where she has sent some bikers before who enjoyed it. Unfortunately it rained quite heavily for a few days so I holed up and waited until it cleared and set off.

I had actually seen Lake Chicamba a few months before when I was in the Chimanimani mountains in Zimbabwe. Here's the picture from my previous ride report :



Driving west from Chimoio you turn off after about 40 km's and you will eventually come across the dam. I got told off by security for taking this photo.*



I ate a nice fish lunch at one of the restaurants overlooking the lake and continued my ride. To be honest the Zimbabwean side was more impressive.



As the weather had cleared up nicely I headed down towards Vilanculos. On the way I had to join the military convoy which I just about caught 10 minutes before it left. We passed without any gun fire or other incidents which was good although I did hear that a bus was shot at and several people injured a few days later.

When I arrive in Vilanculos I had a look at Zombie Cucumber*which was very nice but there was hardly anybody there so I checked in to*Baobab Beach backpackers. I had the dorm to myself for most of my 4 night stay which was a nice bonus. Here's a couple of pictures I took around the grounds and the view :



__________________
Live Ride Report : Live GPS Tracking
Reply With Quote
  #51  
Old 7 May 2014
TechnomadicJim's Avatar
Gold Member
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 52
It took a few days of waiting but I managed to get on a tour and dive of Bazarota with Odyssea dive which was amazing. Really awesome place. Here's a GoPro shot selfie from the dune I hiked up :



Beautiful coloured water and dunes.



I did two dives (my first in Africa) on the two mile reef.



Moray Eel :



Shoal :



My best picture of the dive's :





Underwater selfie...



Some fish. I'm really crap with their names...



Finally I get my first puncture! The value was ripped from the tube so I just replaced the whole tube for 250 Mets. I did try and get the tyre off myself but I just couldn't get it off and I was starting to damage the tyre so I gave up and this guy did it for 75 Mets.



Not wanting to linger too long in Mozambique I headed south again to Tofo. I crossed the Tropic of Capricorn for the 3rd time (in 3 countries) of my trip :



I had a drive around Tofo but wasn't that impressed to be honest. I'm not much of a beach person as I find them boring and Tofo felt very touristy so I decided not to hang around too long. Whilst there I stayed at the Mozambeat Motel which is a South African run "boutique" backpackers. Very nice place with an awesome pool, bar and cinema!*



A view *of the beach from Casa Barry.



After only two nights I headed south to Maputo. It was a long slog or a ride. 500 km's. I left at 9am and arrived 5:30pm. It was mostly continuous riding and just to set me up for the day I got soaked by heavy rain about 50 km's out of Tofo. It took about 300 km's before I finally dried. Nice! Also about 100 km's from Maputo I noticed my speedo started malfunctioning. Something I need to work out along with the fact I have just run out of chain lube.

Most of the police waved me on during the day but one guy stopped me took a closer look and just pointed and said Go! I didn't hang around... Another one went through all my documentation with a fine tooth comb and let me proceed because he couldn't find anything out of order. He did question the fact my driving license expires in 2051 which was a weird mistake by the UK DVLA who issued the license. The traffic into Maputo was terrible. I arrived at rush hour and combined with all the road works going on it was a nightmare getting to "Base Backpackers" where I checked in for a couple of nights.

I spent today trying to buy chain lube. I went to the main Honda dealership and they didn't have any idea and just told me to go to Game which I did and as I expected they didn't sell any. Tomorrow I will try Mica and the Yamaha dealership. I also took the front tyre off today and inspected the speedo gear. As I thought the guy who replaced my inner tube didn't seat the gear correctly and its worn down part of it. The guys at Honda will take a look tomorrow. They have CTX's and XL 200's so they should have the part. If not I will get it sorted in Swaziland.

Ideally I would like to leave for Swaziland tomorrow but will see how I do for time. I don't mind Maputo as it seems like quite a nice city with plenty to do. I plan on crossing into Swaziland via Goba and heading for wither "Sundowners" or "Sondzela". I reckon I will setup a base at one of those two and spend a few days exploring Swaziland in loops. Its such a small country it should only take a few days to explore.

As always I'm interested in anyone's feedback on things to see and do, roads to ride etc.. As I'm getting close to South Africa I'm sure you guys know plenty about this area. More long term I'm also looking for a nice itinerary to get back to cape town so please send your recommendations

Distance so far : 22,500 km's
__________________
Live Ride Report : Live GPS Tracking
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 8 May 2014
JHMM's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Cape Town - South Africa
Posts: 114
Interesting reading

Your trip report makes for interesting reading. When in South Africa are you coming to Cape Town at all? If so let me know, will be good to have a .
__________________
To those who say it can't be done - stand aside for those who are already doing it.
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 9 May 2014
TechnomadicJim's Avatar
Gold Member
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by JHMM View Post
Your trip report makes for interesting reading. When in South Africa are you coming to Cape Town at all? If so let me know, will be good to have a .
Thanks man. I just sent you an email
__________________
Live Ride Report : Live GPS Tracking
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 16 May 2014
TechnomadicJim's Avatar
Gold Member
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 52
The guys at Honda Maputo were pretty useless and didn't have the part or any chain lube and couldn't tell me where I could buy any! Do they not lube their chains at all ? Anyway I left Maputo and headed west through Matola. I popped into the Yamaha dealership and managed to buy some chain lube there.

Leaving Mozambique was quick and easy. Entering Swaziland was even easier! They didn't even require a TIP or check any of my documentation. I paid 50 rand road tax and that was it.



The guys watched as I stuck my Swaziland sticker on the bike too.



I had lunch in Sideki and sorted out an MTN sim card. MTN are the only provider in Swaziland on account of the king apparently owning a 30% share and banning all competitors. On my way to Manzini I was stopped by the Swazi police for a license check. He was curious about my GoPro so I managed to get this picture.



I headed straight for Sundowners Backpackers*and checked in late afternoon. Its a really nice and comfortable place to base yourself and I heard from some of the peace corp volunteers that its the best backpackers in the country.

I was still having trouble with my speedo and noticed Carson Motors just outside Manzini so I popped in the next morning and they replaced the special washer inside for 90 rand. *Below is a picture of the old one. You can see how its worn away where it wasn't seated properly. Unfortunately though this didn't totally fix my problem. The speedo is fine when you are accelerating but when you engine break or cruise it's all over the place. I'm due a service soon so will have it sorted properly then. I reckon the park this washer meshes with is worn too.



The guys in the dealership were very helpful and pretty amazed that I had taken the CTX so far. They have a lot of them in Swaziland so they know the bike well.

That evening I drove up the hill behind the backpackers and watched the Swazi sun set. I also got a nice time lapse video of it too.



I had a lie in the next morning which is easily done at Sundowners, a very comfortable place! I headed out on the bike through Pine valley and past Sibebe to Malolotja Nature Reserve. There was no fee to enter the park and they didn't seem to care I was on a bike which was unusual. I rode all the way around the park for a few hours and took in the awesome views :





That evening I had a few s and a chat with Sergio the owner who rides a GS 1200. Also staying at Sundowners was Max who rides a KLR 650. We all agreed to head out the next day to explore one of Sergios routes in the South West of Swaziland. You can see Max behind me on the KLR.



Stopping for a few pictures.





Awesome view point behind one of the cell towers.



Sergio and I.



Nice trails through the forests.



You can view or download our route here (in GPX format).

Being very aware of the end of my trip looming and after 5 days in Swaziland I decided it was time to head back into South Africa. Here's the route I took as suggested by Max. Mostly tar but with around 20 km's or gravel it was a scenic route towards the border.







Now the flags are building up on the front of the bike people often stop for a look and read out loud all countries I've visited so far. Here's a picture of four guys talking about my bike.



The border crossing itself was pretty straight forward. The fact I had already been in South Africa did cause them a little problem but I have a flight booked for the 30th of June which put them at ease. The police also wanted to check my passport and then driving license but when he saw we were the same age (32) he didn't care about my license any more... weird.



The road beside pongolapoort dam.



I shouldn't really have left it so late to leave as the sun was starting to set and I still had 50 km's of gravel to drive before I made it in to Sodwana. Still I made it just before dark and checked in to Natural Moments Backpackers and got a room for 150 rand per night for two nights. The next morning I headed next door and managed to get on a lunchtime dive to the Stringer dive site on the 2 mile reef.



Underwater there are fish.



Including this Potato bass who was very friendly and curious. I've never seen one before but one of the divers was banging on the floor and it came right up and was very interested in what he was doing. Amazing.



The next morning I headed down the coast to St Lucia and checked in to Budget Backpackers. Being low season I have a whole dorm to myself for 150 rand a night. I plan on going to the crocodile center and visiting the beach today.

Not exactly sure where I will go tomorrow but I may pop in to Durban to get the bike serviced on Monday. As always if there are any suggestions I'm all ears.
__________________
Live Ride Report : Live GPS Tracking
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 16 May 2014
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 10
Really enjoying reading about your trip. Some great pictures and stories
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 25 May 2014
TechnomadicJim's Avatar
Gold Member
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eli90 View Post
Really enjoying reading about your trip. Some great pictures and stories
Hi Eli90. Thanks for tuning in! On with the next installment :

I drove down to beach in St Lucia and had a walk around for a while. Its a really nice long beach and almost nobody there.



After a drive around the town and lunch at the yacht and boat club. I headed to the crocodile sanctuary. I got chatting with the owner who was also a biker. Nice guy.



I don't remember learning this one for my theory test!



The next day I drove to Durban and checked in to Gibela Backpackers Lodge*which wasn't cheap at 240 rand a night for the dorm but its a very well run place. I guess you would call it a "flashpackers" rather than a backpackers. I got in contact with "The Badger" on the forum and he suggested we go out for a ride in the valley of 1000 hills. We met up Sunday morning along with EssBee and his wife and headed out. The weather was great and the views stunning as we weaved off road through the hills.

Taking a tight corner a bit too fast I managed to lowside and my foot got trapped under the bike as I fell forwards. I didn't actually fall over but must have twisted my ankle under the bike. It didn't feel too bad initially so we kept on riding.



Stopping for a rest by this cascading river. In the distance were some "plastic bikes" (as The Badger called them) riding up and down the side of a very steep hill. Impressive stuff.



We finished up the rider about lunch time with the awesome view of the Umgeni river.



Here's a panoramic my The Badger.



We headed down to The Badger's house where his wife kindly made us some lunch and we sat around chatting for an hour or two. After sitting down for a while my foot began to hurt more and by the time I made it to the backpackers it was really quite painful. Here's the bruise that was starting to form a few days later after the swelling had gone down. Ouch!



After resting my ankle for a few days in Durban I could nearly walk again so I booked my bike in and got it serviced at the Honda dealership in Pinetown. It cost me 1330 rand! I had got used to cheap services on my travels and this was a bit of a shock but they did a good service and drove me around which is was being serviced. In fact I'm not entirely sure that the Honda dealerships in Malawi and Zimbabwe were official dealerships just because they had Honda painted on the wall outside. Ohh well.

The next day I was feeling better and decided to head off to the Champagne Valley in the Drakensburg. After taking the motorway about 2/3rds of the way I set my GPS to avoid motorways and took an R road and then some dirt roads the rest of the way. I came across this bridge full of cows.



As it became for hilly I could tell the scenery was going to only get better as I got deeper into the mountains.



The mountains in the background as you drive into the Champagne valley.



I headed for Inkosana Lodge which was recommended by the last backpackers. The place is pretty much empty because it's low season but its a really nice place to stay and very reasonable at 150 rand per night for my personal dorm. The day after I arrived I regretted leaving so early. My ankle was really hurting again and the bruising had got worse. Perhaps I had pushed myself a bit too much!*

One evening I had a nice long chat with a friendly Australian lady and a fellow Wild Dog who I didn't actually get the name of in the end. Please post up here if you read this so I know who you are. It was a pleasure to meet you and have a good chat*

This morning I decided that I should probably go and have the ankle x-ray'd just in case it was broken and needed treatment. I hopped on the bike drove 5 meters and noticed I have a flat front tyre! Noooooo! This is really not what I need right now. Its Sunday too and nobody is about to help me out so I soldier on and manage to get the tyre off and with the aid of some washing up liquid I managed to break the bead and inspect the inner tube. That crappy repair I had done in Mozambique was back to haunt me again. The rubber band that protects the tube from the spokes had snapped where he had bodged it together with glue and thread. Its a lot colder now so I wonder if that was what made it break now as opposed to earlier. I managed to get some thread, glue and gaffa tape and repair it. It seemed to hold and was a bit of a pain to get on the rim again as its much smaller than it was originally. I must replace it soon before it goes again otherwise I will probably have to make one with an old inner tube. I decided to use my new spare tube instead of patching the old one as its a slightly better brand and will hopefully last longer. I managed to get the tyre back on again with the aid of more washing up liquid only to pump it up and realise I had pinched the tube. Grrrrr.... So again I remove the tube and repair it and replace it. Guess what ? I pinched it again! Remember I'm trying to sort all this out with a really sore potentially broken ankle. Not my best of days. I carry on though and repair the tube again. This time I pinched it twice.



I decided I needed a different method so I went online and researched some extra tips. This time I inflated the tyre slightly and used the other side of the tyre lever with more of a hook to get it back on. This worked perfectly. Success!*



Very happy with myself after 3 hours of hobbling about and 4 patches later I have fixed both inner tubes and finally put the tyre back on the bike so I can get myself to Ladysmith for an x-ray tomorrow. I notice this evening that my ankle if feeling better than yesterday and the bruising has gone down a lot. I think I will see how I feel tomorrow. I'm hoping to explore the Drakensburg and then drive the sani pass soon so I hope to get better sooner rather than later.

KM's so far 24,800.
__________________
Live Ride Report : Live GPS Tracking
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 25 May 2014
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 8
Great blog posts and trip! Good luck as you near the end of your ride.
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 9 Jun 2014
TechnomadicJim's Avatar
Gold Member
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by khestee View Post
Great blog posts and trip! Good luck as you near the end of your ride.
Thanks khestee!

---

After leaving the hospital happy that my ankle wasn't broken I was greeted with another flat tyre. That bodge repair I had made on the rubber band that that protects the tube from where the spokes screws must have given way. Luckily there was a petrol station close by so I got them to pump it up again temporarily which gave me just enough air to get to a local motorcycle shop. They replaced the inner tube and the rubber band for me while I had lunch at Wimpy (Dagwood and chips, nice!). Unfortunately I must have dropped or left my gloves somewhere in all the mayhem as they wern't with my helmet when I picked up the bike. That's my second pair lost now! Doh! I blame the relaxant / pain relief they injected me with before the scan.

Unfortunately my speedo wasn't working again and upon further inspection back at Inkosana lodge I noticed that they had not seated the speedo gear properly and it had pulled the cable out. Not a problem though as I fixed this up myself and the speedo actually works 100% now as opposed to before where it would falter when I wasn't accelerating therefore giving a slightly (~12% according to my gps) mileage reading. All good now though



The bike working well again I was bored hanging around the lodge (as nice as it was) and decided I needed a day out riding round the Drakensberg so I headed off first to the Cathedral Peak hotel for some tea (of course!). Here's a couple of pictures of the peaks :





Next I took this windy gravel road towards northern Drakensberg :



I popped in to the Amphitheater Backpackers for some lunch and then looped back round to the northern Drakensberg.



I came across the graffiti on the way and had to stop for a picture. Always makes the bike look cooler when there's some colour matched artwork behind it!



Time was getting on so the next day I decided to head towards the Sani pass and drove across some pretty remote windy gravel roads. On the last stretch with the sun setting I came around a corner with the sun in my eyes and just about saw a truck at the last second parked at possibly the worst part of the road with no warning triangle. I hope the next drivers that come along see the truck in time! I checked in to Sani Lodge Backpackers where I spent the night in one of their dorms.
__________________
Live Ride Report : Live GPS Tracking
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 9 Jun 2014
TechnomadicJim's Avatar
Gold Member
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 52
In the morning I set off down the pass and got stamped out of SA no problem and began working my way up the pass. The scenery really is spectacular here.



The view from about half way up down the valley.



As I was working my way up I noticed a guy walking down and as I got closer recognised him. His name was John from Ireland and we had met in Malawi at Nkhata bay so we chatted for about half an hour and swapped details. Small world!

Next I tackled the end of the pass with its tight hairpin turns. Doing it on the CTX200 was actually pretty easy if I'm honest despite my tires not having so much grip left in them.





The Lesotho immigration was pretty run down but quick and efficient. I had to pay 30 rand for the bike and that was all.

I popped into the highest pub in Africa and had some lunch where I met some other tourists who were very interested in hearing my story after they heard how long I had been on the road. One of these characters was a south African called Rudy who gave me some pointers on a route and explained about Prince harry's involvement in Lesotho and his motorbiking across it quite frequently. Interesting.



It must have been about 3pm by the time I left the pub and headed off to try and find some accommodation. I couldn't find very much information online about Lesotho so I was relying on a poorly drawn map I had been given by a guide at the last backpackers. I made my way down the very rocky roads and wondered, at the pace I was going, whether I would actually make it somewhere before dark! I took a turning just before Mokhotlong and after about 10-20 km's reached a turn off to a lodge that was on my hand drawn map. The locals pointed me down a terrible road which lead to some stone houses. The guy in the local shop showed me the hostel / lodge that was 150 rand a night. I was the only one there but glad to have found a bed for the night. It was freezing cold and there was no heating or electricity of course. I cooked up some baked beans and tuna and made myself a cup of soup to warm up. Luckily I had my sleeping bag the duvet and 3 blankets to keep warm.

I slept pretty well and had my breakfast then went outside to check on the bike and came across this guy who I thought was a night watchman. He didn't speak any English nor I Sotho. He seemed to be pointing at some sticks so I just nodded and gave him the thumbs up which is pretty standard when you can't speak the language. After breakfast I began packing up the bike and he started to play one of the sticks which have a really weird sound. It was pretty interesting and entertaining while I packed the bike so I gave him 10 rand which I think was perhaps too much. He was so pleased he tried to kiss my hand!



Setting off I came across the first ice I had seen outside of a drink. It really is cold up here and its not even properly winter yet!*



The road was in pretty bad condition and my ankle was still a bit sore so it made it tough going in places. Looking at the distance involved and my lack of accommodation options I was again a bit worried I had bitten off more than I can chew. Still the scenery was amazing!



Another village up in the mountains.



One of the rivers winding its way through the mountains. Spectacular.



They seem to be working on extending the roads towards the Sani Pass and I wonder how long it is before its tar all the way!



After averaging 20 km's an hour (with breaks) I made it to Thaba Tseka and that's where the proper tar began. They also sold fuel there which was a relief as I wasn't sure at all on how easily obtainable fuel would be. I had been carrying my extra 10 liters of fuel just in case. I had some lunch and then headed off towards Roma where I planned to spend the night on the advice of Rudy the previous day. If I had more time and my ankle was a but better I would have liked to have perhaps explored up to the Dam and stayed there for the night.



I worked my way through the many mountain passes including this interestingly named one. Must have been tough back before it was paved!



The decent down towards Roma was impressive too. Nice twisty roads to ride along.



The landscape become less mountainous the further west you travel through Lesotho. As I drove into Roma I came across this rock jutting out of the ground next to the church.



I stayed at The Trading Post Lodge which I gather is where they start the Roof of Africa race from. I met a really nice Canadian couple who were adopting two local orphaned boys. One of them sat on the bike with my helmet on for some photos. Kids do love motorbikes.

The next morning I headed for the border. I avoided Maseru and headed south exiting and entering SA at Sepapushek. I do prefer small border crossings as I find they are quicker and friendlier like this one.



I didn't really have a plan so I headed towards east London and met another biker on the way called Johan from Bloemfontein so we stopped at Wimpy and I had some lunch while he had a coffee and some ice cream. I left it a bit late to make it to East London so ended up staying at a small B&B in Queenstown. That evening I released I had missed the "Wild Coast" area. "The Badger" had recommended Port St Johns to me so rather than heading to EL I headed there the next day.

Port St Johns was OK I guess. I stayed at Amapondo Backpackers*for a couple of nights as I needed some rest. I usually like to spend at least a couple of nights at places because its getting quite tiring getting everything ready each day and also it allows you to actually experience some of it rather than rolling on through.

Some backpackers I met recommended that my next stop should be Mdumbi instead of Coffee Bay so I checked it out. Here's a picture of the river joining the sea on the way in.



Mdumbi beach. There were a few surfers staying at the place too. Seems like a popular spot.



I checked into Mdumbi Backpackers*and decided to stay for a couple of nights. I met some friendly people to hang out with in the evenings and spent the next day visiting Coffee Bay and the "Hole in the wall" :





On my way back I was riding a gravel corner when a cow ran in front of my bike at the last minute. I grabbed a fist full of front brake and fell off again on the same bad foot. Damn! I swore at the stupid cow that ran off and expected more ankle pain. Fortunately for me it wasn't crushed under the bike and it didn't seem to do much damage so I was lucky and drove a little slower round the cows on the rest of the way back.



I get most of my travel advice from other travelers. Its the most up to date information and almost always a good choice. I was recommended to stay at Buccaneers Backpackers in*Cintsa as my next stop instead of heading into East London. I drove a lot of gravel through the hills and eventually popped out on the N2.



The next day I headed to Hogsback and checked in to Terra Khaya Eco Backpackers. Its an interesting off the grid eco farm with very friendly people. I managed to snag myself a room for 100 rand as their dorm is full of laborers working on some new buildings. They even have an out door bath which is pretty cool to use at night looking out at the stars above.



I spent the next day exploring 60 km's of the forest trails around the area.



I rode across the side of this hill which I guess looks a bit like a hogs back (?) and round the back. Really nice trails.



Tomorrow I'm probably going to head off somewhere else. I haven't decided where though so lets see what happens. Just over 2 weeks until I want to be in cape town giving myself a week to sort things out and sell the bike.

KM's so far 27,000.

I also need to begin looking into selling the bike. I've just put an advert up in the Wild Dog small ads section so check it out here. I'm very interested in any help selling it so if you know anyone who might want it or if you yourself want the bike let me know by PM. All the details are in the thread there. I'm also interested what you think about the price (22,000 rand) and description etc.. I plan on listing it on gumtree soon but thought I would try here first.
__________________
Live Ride Report : Live GPS Tracking
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 4 Jul 2014
TechnomadicJim's Avatar
Gold Member
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 52
I left Hogsback and headed to Addo after an invitation from John to stay at his backpackers. I left a bit late after so ended up riding the main road through the park in the dark which wasn't the best idea. I also ended up riding straight past addo backpackers and managed to see my error with only 2% battery left on my gps! John welcomed me and sorted me out with a nice room for the night despite me turning up late and unannounced. Thanks again John!



The next days ride was an easy one down to Jefrey's Bay. I popped in to Game in PE on the way to get some oil. I met an 82 year old ex-biker on his scooter and had a good chat. The more flag stickers on my bike the more I get approached by people curious about my trip. At lunch time I met up with jupiter for some tea near his work. We had a good chat and agreed to meet up with a few others over the next days. I checked in to a dorm at*Ubuntu Backpackers*in Jefrey's Bay and had some good food at Nina's Real Food. Recommended!

I arranged with jupiter to come visit the next evening and he kindly offered me a room for the night so I didn't have to drive back. It was a really cool hanging out with Tiger8, Crab and jupiter. Thanks for the pizza too *After a good nights sleep I headed back to Jefrey's Bay. It was freezing and I should have taken up Tiger8's offer of a coffee in the morning. Doh!



Jupiter gave me a map and suggestions for riding Baviaanskloof. Along with Die Hell I had Baviaanskloof recommended to me right at the beginning of my trip and was looking forward to riding it. I set off the next morning through Patensie and paid my entrance fee.



This was the main deeper water crossing of the route. I heard later that one side is much deeper than the other and I think I went down the deep side as the bike was just over half submerged for a small part of it. Nothing compared to my Botswana crossing of the pans so I wasn't too phased.



I passed a fair few bikers on the way and stopped for lunch with 3 German bikers who worked for Mercedes in East London. They made me some bacon and noodles, nice!



Jaywalking :



I see Radioman has been here too!



I exited Baviaanskloof quite late and ended up staying at a B&B in Uniondale. The next morning I rode Price Alfreds pass to natures valley and checked in to Wild Spirit Backpackers. They even accepted*Bitcoin*and I was their first customer.*Pretty cool! Its a nice chilled eco backpackes with some nice walks in the area.*Here's the view from their dining area :



I popped down to Natures Valley for lunch and walked on the beach :



As I was riding back up the hill I noticed my front sprocket was slipping and upon closer inspection it was completely worn! oops! I had to be really gentle on the throttle. I booked myself in for my 28,000 km service at Honda George where I had my original 1k service. The next morning I packed up and headed off (gently) to George. Luckily they fit me in and remembered me from before.



With a new sprocket and a fresh service the bike was back to normal again. I met up with oldmanorman who kindly invited me to visit. I ended up staying the night and having a great dinner and chat that evening and following morning. Thanks again oldmanorman! It was a pleasure to meet you and your wife*

I headed back to Knysna for a couple of nights and ate some great sea food and watched a few world cup games before heading back into George for one quick cup of tea with oldmanorman and then on to Ladismith Backpackers where I stayed a night.



The next morning I headed to Cape Town. It was a weird feeling seeing the roads and places I saw nearly 9 months before. It began to really sink in that my trip was nearly over. I passed Ronnies Sex Shop but only stopped for a photo as I wanted to get into Cape Town.



I arrived in good time and checked into my favorite backpackers there, the*B.I.G Backpackers in green point. Th next day I rode Chapmans Peak one last time and had some lunch at Olympia Cafe in Kalk Bay. Good food if you get a chance! As I drove back the chain felt as if something wasn't right but on inspection I couldn't see anything wrong. It was only when I got back to the backpackers I noticed the problem :



Eeek! The following morning I picked up my replacement front mud guard from Honda and asked if they could sort the chain but they gave me the address of Craig's motorcycle repair. On my way along the N1 just before the woodstock junction the inevitable happened. My chain snapped and I was stuck :



I called everyone I knew and eventually got hold of a guy called Steve who picked me up and took me to Trac Mac where I had a new chain fitted for 250 rand. Phew!



Next I stopped off to see Chris at FlyingBrick and then I picked up my original tires from PistonPete at Outriders.



The following day I took the bike to the viper lounge for a good clean. It only cost 125 rand and they did a great job! An hour was spent by two guys giving it a proper clean. All shiny and new with the front mud guard replaced.



Thanks to the*advert on the forum*I sold the bike to a fellow wild dog on the Saturday (I left on the Monday). I've asked for a photo of the new lady rider when she's out on her first ride. I know she will look after my companion for 9 months.

I hiked Lions Head on the Sunday and got a nice picture taken on a decent camera :



And another on one of the bench's near company gardens.



Monday evening I took the MyCiti bus to the airport and flew with British Airways direct for 10 hours arriving in the UK 6:00 am. Two more buses and I was back with my family. I have the front mud guard, worn sprocket and a cracked sump plug as keep sake's from the bike.



Thanks to everyone who I met on the trip and everyone who followed me online with my ride reports. It was great to have you all along for the ride!

I plan on posting a few stats like my budget and all my GPS traces. I also want to edit together a video of the trip and will obviously post that here too although that may take a little while to edit together so bear with me

I'll let you all know when my next adventure takes place but in meantime I have a hell of a lot of work to do!

Total KM's: 29,000. 9 Countries, 9 Months.
__________________
Live Ride Report : Live GPS Tracking
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
200cc, africa, honda, solo, southern africa


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 2 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 2 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Paperwork needed for Southern Africa ddziewan sub-Saharan Africa 6 24 Nov 2013 13:51
Looking for an adventure in Southern Africa? des275 Travellers Seeking Travellers 4 27 Oct 2013 13:14
From zero to Zambia: A learner about Africa Riders for Health Ride Tales 0 22 Mar 2013 13:13
Honda CRF 250L: a suitable bike for Africa touring? larrysimpson The HUBB PUB 6 15 Jan 2013 03:34

 
 

Announcements

Thinking about traveling? Not sure about the whole thing? Watch the HU Achievable Dream Video Trailers and then get ALL the information you need to get inspired and learn how to travel anywhere in the world!

Have YOU ever wondered who has ridden around the world? We did too - and now here's the list of Circumnavigators!
Check it out now
, and add your information if we didn't find you.

Next HU Eventscalendar

HU Event and other updates on the HUBB Forum "Traveller's Advisories" thread.
ALL Dates subject to change.

2024:

Add yourself to the Updates List for each event!

Questions about an event? Ask here

HUBBUK: info

See all event details

 
World's most listened to Adventure Motorbike Show!
Check the RAW segments; Grant, your HU host is on every month!
Episodes below to listen to while you, err, pretend to do something or other...

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

"Ultimate global guide for red-blooded bikers planning overseas exploration. Covers choice & preparation of best bike, shipping overseas, baggage design, riding techniques, travel health, visas, documentation, safety and useful addresses." Recommended. (Grant)



Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance.

Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance™ combines into a single integrated program the best evacuation and rescue with the premier travel insurance coverages designed for adventurers.

Led by special operations veterans, Stanford Medicine affiliated physicians, paramedics and other travel experts, Ripcord is perfect for adventure seekers, climbers, skiers, sports enthusiasts, hunters, international travelers, humanitarian efforts, expeditions and more.

Ripcord travel protection is now available for ALL nationalities, and travel is covered on motorcycles of all sizes!


 

What others say about HU...

"This site is the BIBLE for international bike travelers." Greg, Australia

"Thank you! The web site, The travels, The insight, The inspiration, Everything, just thanks." Colin, UK

"My friend and I are planning a trip from Singapore to England... We found (the HU) site invaluable as an aid to planning and have based a lot of our purchases (bikes, riding gear, etc.) on what we have learned from this site." Phil, Australia

"I for one always had an adventurous spirit, but you and Susan lit the fire for my trip and I'll be forever grateful for what you two do to inspire others to just do it." Brent, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the (video) series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring!" Jennifer, Canada

"Your worldwide organisation and events are the Go To places to for all serious touring and aspiring touring bikers." Trevor, South Africa

"This is the answer to all my questions." Haydn, Australia

"Keep going the excellent work you are doing for Horizons Unlimited - I love it!" Thomas, Germany

Lots more comments here!



Five books by Graham Field!

Diaries of a compulsive traveller
by Graham Field
Book, eBook, Audiobook

"A compelling, honest, inspiring and entertaining writing style with a built-in feel-good factor" Get them NOW from the authors' website and Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, Amazon.co.uk.



Back Road Map Books and Backroad GPS Maps for all of Canada - a must have!

New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80G/S.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events all over the world with the help of volunteers; we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, or ask questions on the HUBB. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 13:44.