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Photo by Igor Djokovic, camping above San Juan river, Arizona USA

I haven't been everywhere...
but it's on my list!


Photo by Igor Djokovic,
camping above San Juan river,
Arizona USA



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  #16  
Old 16 Jun 2013
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Resurecting an old thread to see if the collective experience of the fuel injected Bullets has grown any? Workable machine or plaything for old boys who'd really like a Goldstar (or Lego)? Anything drop off unexpectedly that can't just be screwed back on?

I'm 18 months away from replacing the Weestrom but am finding I really don't need a 70 HP bike massively practical as it is. The choice in smaller stuff is really limited (CB500X is on the radar along with the Gleestrom), there is no way I'm going back to a 40 mpg Bonneville, 125's seem excessively costly to run with their theft insurance and I did enjoy my carbed 5 speed Bullet back in the noughties. Dipping an early toe in the water as it were.

Cheers

Andy
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  #17  
Old 16 Jun 2013
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Enfield

I love my 2012 Royal Enfield C5, & I really want to take it to South America, but unfortunately we have to ride 2up (Wife has problem with arm) so that rules out the Enfield as I don't think it would carry 170kg including luggage & camera gear. But if I was solo it would be with me in a heartbeat !!!!!!

Cheers
Paul
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  #18  
Old 17 Jun 2013
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Since my last post I have been to Poland via south of France, N. Italy , Austria and Czech republic to see the "Flytrap" plus a few trips to various rallies. On the downside I had a big end fail due to a faulty crankpin. other than that it has been fine. The big end bearing and crankpin was replaced with a UK made bigger better set, and at the same time all the bearings were replaced with European ones.
I have managed to set the ignition timing correct ( It was too advanced and combined with a badly heat treated crank pin was jointly responsible for the bearing failure) It now runs smoother and with more "pulling" power. It is happy from the low forties (MPH) up to the low sixties. still turns back about 95MPG (Imperial). It has now done 16 k miles and still on the original Indian made primary chain. Although those are lifed at 18K miles. I have a genuine Reynolds to replace it this winter. It eats Indian made rear chains at about 6k miles, but the cheaper Italian Elite chains are twice as good. At 3k miles significantly less worn than a new Indian made one.
I find I make on average more miles per day on the Enfield than I did on my faster BMW. Partly because I only need to stop once a day for fuel and partly because it is much more comfortable and less tiring. Just seem to bumble along quicker. Bit odd I know.
You will need to carry more tools because they seem to have decided never to use the same size fastener twice. If you have to undo three nuts/bolts you will need at least four different size of spanner.
The only thing that was better on the BMW was no chain maintenance. The problem is that the Enfield is oiltight and you will need to oil the chain daily if doing significant mileage. There is not room enough to use X or O ring chains.
Apart from the chain, I just do an annual maintenance which is good for 3K miles. more than that requires an oil change (DINO cheap oil).

I use soft luggage except for a givi top box. and have an Avon (Sprint) full handlebar fairing like the 1960's UK police. This keeps rain, insects and road debris of my upper body and there is no windchill to my upper body. If I could find one I would have used something similar to the old Avonaire touring fairing for all over protection.

Hope that helps.
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  #19  
Old 17 Jun 2013
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Thanks Guys,

Was the crank pin a warranty issue? Was there support there or were you left to sort it yourself?

Cheers

Andy
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  #20  
Old 18 Jun 2013
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Wankersonian Squire denied all responsibility for it ( failed at 13K miles) and said they did not fail. I know for a fact that they were lying as several members and associates of the Enfield club got them replaced under warranty. Several companies do an upgraded part to fix this problem. The repair costs less than an ignition fault can cost on a modern bike and I did ride home from Poland with it rattling so was not stranded. This is the beauty of old technology, it will still soldier on despite degradation. Electronics tend to run perfectly or die completely without warning.

In my case it was a combination of the NON adjustable ignition firing early and causing pinking under load combined with poor materials and heat treating of the crankpin. the rollers run directly on the crankpin. I fixed the timing by making an offset woodruff key for the rotor.
I had to make my own as besides machining the groove it the wrong place it was also to the wrong depth. A new replacement complete crankshaft and conrod is about £200 so not all the world.

I did a drive in drive out repair at Pricepart motorcycles. think it cost £600. For that I drove the bike in, he stripped it down rebuilt it replacing all the bearing with European ones. the crank was rebuild by specialists with a new crankpin using better materials and a new European bearing. the conrod was bored and had a special hardened steel insert fitted. If I remember correctly he also serviced the front caliper and fitted a new battery. when the bike was ready I picked it up and did a test ride and brought it home.

Once you have done a quality control inspection and test of the AVL Enfield it makes a good bike. Whilst a road bike, the trials heritage of the frame comes through in the tight radius circles in which you can turn and the balance. Often I stop at traffic lights etc. without needing to put either foot down. For me a great bonus is the ease at which you can convert it to Right foot gearchange, Left foot brake. The conversion is easily reversible (say two hours).

The only ongoing niggle is chain maintenance (having to do it) the only viable solution would be to get a shaft drive bike. Fitting better European chains have more than doubled the life/halved the maintenance on this.

Last edited by oldbmw; 18 Jun 2013 at 23:46. Reason: typo
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  #21  
Old 21 Jun 2013
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Hmm. I had a 1996 iron barrel for about 4 years. I can't remember how many miles I put on it, but it was several thousand miles. I used it mostly for putting around town and commuting to work, but did do a couple of weekend trips of about 400 to 600 miles in distance.

I found it to be reasonably reliable, actually. No major issues, and I can only remember being stuck on the side of the road once for something minor that I fixed in 15 minutes. I sold my Enfield only because I left the country for 4 years.

I noticed the other day that a local vendor has a "held-over" but 0 KM 2011 G5 model. He is asking $6500 CND and I am giving it some serious consideration....
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  #22  
Old 21 Jun 2013
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[QUOTE=brclarke;426852
I.. am giving it some serious consideration....[/QUOTE]

You and me both mate. Head varies between yes and maybe, heart says yes!

15 months to save up though. Thanks for you help gentlemen.

Andy
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  #23  
Old 24 Jun 2013
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Enfield

My wife has just declared she will be riding her own bike in Sth. America !!!!
Which is very good news for me as I can send my BMW home and take my New 2012 Royal Enfield C5 for the rest of our RTW.
Andy can you give me some tips on how I should change anything if anything ?
Someone told me I should have the wheels re-spoked & a new chain ?
I was just going to throw on some aluminium panniers a bit of a windscreen & a smile & be on my way ????

Cheers
Paul
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  #24  
Old 24 Jun 2013
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Nice one, can't wait for the reports

My '05 iron barrel wheels would have been OK IMHO. I'd have put a new battery on and stocked up on clutch cables though.

OldBMW will tell us more I'm sure.

Andy
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  #25  
Old 24 Jun 2013
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Check both sprockets. they seldom give trouble and are unlikely to need anything. buy two chains the same brand. not Indian made. Elite are good value as are others. (think HD chains will fit) Running them as a pair means in an emergency you can change a chain in less than five minutes with just a pair of pliers and a screwdriver. Generally I use one a s goingthere chain and regard the spare as a getting home chain. Often this does not get fitted as wont be needed. DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN the chain, the later suspensions are gas and have a longer stroke so it is easy to set them too tight when on the centre stand. you want about an inch play with the bike loaded and on the suspension with you on it. You will need someone to help. Also do not trust the chain adjusters to be correctly marked. put the bike empty on the centre stand and spin the back wheel backwards. check the chain runs freely equidistant from both sides of the rear sprocket. carry a spare clutch/throttle cable sealed in a plastic bag.
DO NOT INCREASE the gearing ratio. it will slow you down anywhere except when going downhill with a following wind on a motorway.
Spare spokes can be fitted on an assembled wheel I have seen it done but never had the need myself. That bike was overloaded, overgeared and hotted up and struggled going up hills whilst mine trundled up them easily. It is worth carrying a spare rim tape to fit if you need to change a tube.
Note also tyre pressures are meant to be lower than is often common for tubeless tyres.

Service your bike and keep all of the tools needed together as your toolkit.

that should do it.
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  #26  
Old 25 Jun 2013
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Enfield

So I take it that only the chain could be problematic ? What about re-spoking the wheels ? Yes/No. Also Heidenau Tyres ? Can you run tubeless ?.
Also I don't really understand the bit about running 2 chains side by side.(I am not mechanical minded) Yes I will be taking the 2 cables !!!

Thanks
Paul
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  #27  
Old 26 Jun 2013
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Heidenaus worked well on the Bonneville so if they'll fit do it.

Chains and sprockets wear together. A new chain on a 10000 mile sprocket can only "stretch"/wear pins until you have a set of paired up parts that'll look like it did 11000 miles. As there is more room for wear on the sprockets and a clip link chain is a ten minute job to get on and off (use the one on to pull the next one through), you can run chain number 1 from zero to 1000 miles, chain 2 1001-2000, chain 1 2001-3000 or whatever the numbers are. While you have the part worn chain off you can also boil it up in wax or give it a serious clean in paraffin to really get as much grit and rubbish off as you can. Two chains and one set of sprockets cycled through is cheaper and will probably outlast two full sets , you are just adding work as the trade off. Not so much work with a clip link, more hassle than it's worth with rivet links on more powerful stuff and hence a lost art.

Andy
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  #28  
Old 26 Jun 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulD View Post
So I take it that only the chain could be problematic ? What about re-spoking the wheels ? Yes/No. Also Heidenau Tyres ? Can you run tubeless ?.
Also I don't really understand the bit about running 2 chains side by side.(I am not mechanical minded) Yes I will be taking the 2 cables !!!

Thanks
Paul
Chains not really a problem, but on Enfields they are not x or o ring so wear faster than those. A new elite will run 3,000 miles without needing adjustment. I like to start with a new one on and a new spare. They take just 2-5 minutes to change if you do not need to adjust. I have never in my life needed to replace aspoke whilst on aride, but it can be done. just suggest you take a few as getting spares might not be easy and they cost little and weigh less.
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  #29  
Old 6 Jul 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldbmw View Post
Since my last post I have been to Poland via south of France, N. Italy , Austria and Czech republic to see the "Flytrap" plus a few trips to various rallies. On the downside I had a big end fail due to a faulty crankpin. other than that it has been fine. The big end bearing and crankpin was replaced with a UK made bigger better set, and at the same time all the bearings were replaced with European ones.
I have managed to set the ignition timing correct ( It was too advanced and combined with a badly heat treated crank pin was jointly responsible for the bearing failure) It now runs smoother and with more "pulling" power. It is happy from the low forties (MPH) up to the low sixties. still turns back about 95MPG (Imperial). It has now done 16 k miles and still on the original Indian made primary chain. Although those are lifed at 18K miles. I have a genuine Reynolds to replace it this winter. It eats Indian made rear chains at about 6k miles, but the cheaper Italian Elite chains are twice as good. At 3k miles significantly less worn than a new Indian made one.
I find I make on average more miles per day on the Enfield than I did on my faster BMW. Partly because I only need to stop once a day for fuel and partly because it is much more comfortable and less tiring. Just seem to bumble along quicker. Bit odd I know.
You will need to carry more tools because they seem to have decided never to use the same size fastener twice. If you have to undo three nuts/bolts you will need at least four different size of spanner.
The only thing that was better on the BMW was no chain maintenance. The problem is that the Enfield is oiltight and you will need to oil the chain daily if doing significant mileage. There is not room enough to use X or O ring chains.
Apart from the chain, I just do an annual maintenance which is good for 3K miles. more than that requires an oil change (DINO cheap oil).

I use soft luggage except for a givi top box. and have an Avon (Sprint) full handlebar fairing like the 1960's UK police. This keeps rain, insects and road debris of my upper body and there is no windchill to my upper body. If I could find one I would have used something similar to the old Avonaire touring fairing for all over protection.

Hope that helps.
Flytrap, what is that?????
atb
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  #30  
Old 11 Jul 2013
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Royal Enfield

Does anybody have a link to the Greg Staves story, it looks interesting, but 13 years ago. Greg Staves, raising money for cancer research, rode an Indian-
built 500cc Enfield from Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, to Ushuaia, Argentina."

Cheers
Paul
Also anybody know where I can get hand protectors (Barkbusters) for an Enfield. ?
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