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Other Bikes Tech For Technical Questions on bikes not listed in the other forums.
Photo by James Duncan, Universe Camp, Uyuni Salt Flats

I haven't been everywhere...
but it's on my list!


Photo by James Duncan,
"Universe Camp"
Uyuni Salt Flats



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  #31  
Old 14 May 2015
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As promised.

Hi guys I did say I would let you know what I ended up with. As TWB said prices for 2nd hand stuff were extortionate. It was hard to find a Guzzi south of 6k and the same goes for the Kwacker. I did test ride a Bonnie and the seat was like a plank and the suspension made my fillings rattle. (False teeth may be the answer here?) I have to admit the sound out of the Bonnie was glorious and the engine pulled like a train.

I finally came across a Kawasaki W800 SE with only 2.5K on the clock in showroom condition for £4.8K (Special thanks to Touring Ted for this gem) I bought it and rode it home last night and have to say I was nursing a semi all the way home. It appears to do everything the Bonnie does but with much kinder suspension for these old bones.

My much loved Transalp has gone to Touring Ted who I am sure will give it a nice home and look after it. I will periodically post up notes about servicing and ride conditions for any one to make a comparison with the Guzzi. I would have loved to have bought one and it was my first choice but for £2k less the Kwacker will do.

I still have the Dommie for camping trips and solo projects. If prices of a 2nd hand Guzzi drop drastically over the next couple of years I may trade in the W800 for one.
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  #32  
Old 14 May 2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenmanalishi View Post
Hi guys I did say I would let you know what I ended up with.
Thanks for the update, much appreciated.

I guess you will write in the Kawa tech section.
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  #33  
Old 14 May 2015
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Nice one.

Can we now finally do a three way comparison (well in a month or three when you've got the miles in)?

Theory said the W800 had less go, but as all manufacturers measure power anywhere from the main bearing to the wheel and weight as loaded/unloaded/kerb/ready to ride/without oil/without paint/calculated/came to them in dream etc. we need a test to know. Personally I bet there is no noticeable difference unless two up.

What's the real world range? Again theory says the Kawa has better efficiency than the Bonnie but not the V7's big tank? 200 miles without a nervous breakdown?

Any annoyances? Stuff employing chocolate fireguard designs or monkey metal construction?

Enjoy your ride, I think the W800 maybe a bike you'll want to keep.

Andy
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  #34  
Old 1 Jun 2015
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Stan, Well I think the bike is a fine choice (even though its Jap !) but fine all the same. They are very pretty and have something about them - i can see the attraction. (That's hard praise coming from me Honest !).

I am surprised you could not find a Guzzi for similar money there are plenty around the £4500 mark but hey ho i bet your a happy man - but the images in my head of you riding with your semi really does not bear thinking about - less details - please Stan.

Skål Jake
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  #35  
Old 5 Aug 2015
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Andy
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  #36  
Old 9 Sep 2015
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I am looking at another Guzzi myself maybe later this year. I am a member of the Guzzi club in anycase but have heard a few bad bits about Piaggio - who recently when taken to court over repeated failing of the Valve cams on the 8v model by a Guzzi club member - after the camshafts have failed three times and been replaced under warranty twice - however the third time they refuse to pay for labour and say that the bike and extended warranty expired. For goodwill provided the parts but not the labour costs. Which i suppose is arguable - however the case revolved around the fact that camshafts should last as a major component part of the engine - they are not a consumable or wearing part like a clutch etc. So should be replaced if they fail. Piaggio admitted the camshafts had been a problem and sub standard material / design and alternative material was being sourced for the re manufacture.
They wriggled out of any liability - as they Do NOT SELL motorcycles or motorcycle parts ! (contrary to what it states at companies house),They only promote the sale of motorcycles and parts. Piaggio do not have any warehouse or parts or stock. All spares are held by Fowlers motorcycle Bristol. Apparently it was concluded that the selling dealer holds responsability to pay for the bits and replacement. so you then have an argument with your dealer. who may not want to shell out for the bits. In this case the dealer was no longer trading so piaggio was taken to court. Piaggio won but the judge did not award costs (which were pretty high) to the losing party. Which in itself says something about the case and the technicial get out of jail card piaggio played. there are now only 22 dealers in the uk for moto guzzi there were 40 dealers in 2010 - maybe a problem somewhere me thinks between piaggio and the dealers.
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  #37  
Old 9 Sep 2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake View Post
. there are now only 22 dealers in the uk for moto guzzi there were 40 dealers in 2010 - maybe a problem somewhere me thinks between piaggio and the dealers.
You are being generous to Piaggio in using the word "maybe".

Best to check what other models of bikes and scooters Piaggio don't actually sell but merely promote.
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  #38  
Old 9 Sep 2015
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Why would Piaggio be any different to any other vehicle manufacturer? They are big and have a legal department they pay regardless. The consumer is small and pays by the hour until they run of money. The company I work for has the same policy and set up, no one buys from us, we advise and your dealer buys from the subsidiary company in Litchenstein.

The lesson is to trade the bike at another dealer while it is running. This is a factor worth considering with a Guzzi as they depreciate like a knackered lift loaded with bricks. I got rid of a Ural Friday afternoon job that way. The dealer who sells on then covers the next buyer. Triumph and BMW in my experience don't even let it go that far, they just refuse the warranty claim at the first go.

Piaggio don't want some of the old dealers and do indeed seem to be pushing the boutique style places. If they do want to be Harley rather than BMW circa 1979 it is a factor for those not ready for the idea that the warranty is just a way of pre ordering overpriced oil changes. I haven't spoken to a dealer since I got the bike 1.5 years ago.

MGCGB is not a place to get a balanced view IMHO, there are a lot of old boys over there who have pinned their colours firmly to a brand and aren't prepared for an entity they associate with themselves to treat them like the consumer they are. Brand loyalty will hurt you every time.

I don't know if Piaggio engineering breathed on the big block design. My experience is limited to comparing the old boys 2002 Nevarida with my 2014, both small block. I know the big blocks were FI back in the Aprillia days and the 1200's switched from two to four valve, which I guess was the stuff up.

My Piaggio 750 remains a bike I really like.

Andy

Last edited by Threewheelbonnie; 9 Sep 2015 at 18:00.
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  #39  
Old 14 Apr 2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threewheelbonnie View Post

My Piaggio 750 remains a bike I really like.

Andy
In view of the scarcity of information in here about the V7, it seems appropriate to know that the love affair is over
http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hub...tornello-87144

Great thread nevertheless.
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  #40  
Old 1 Jul 2016
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Just seen

3WB sorry to hear the love affair is over, it is after all a magnificent looking machine imho. It would appear that only good luck prevented me from purchasing one when I was looking at them. The W800 is going great although I have only put a few thousand miles on it since purchase. It too suffers with a little corrosion, (no garage) but otherwise not a hint of any problems. It is fast enough for me, I am getting around 50 mpg and it is comfortable. It has sat comfortably at around 70-80 all day with me and a massive amount of luggage ( I don't do the traveling light thing).

Adjustments I have made are bar risers (for my back) scottoiler for low maintenance, screen to keep the flies out of my teeth and pannier racks. Pity I was hoping to bump into you at one of the meets and do a side by side comparison. Anyway best of luck with what ever you decide to replace it with if you have not done so already. Thanks for all the updates and information you have provided.

GM
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  #41  
Old 1 Jul 2016
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Magnificent looks, good handling, fun to ride, there are many positives. Its the usual balance of priorities and features. The fact we want the V7 to be made to Hondas quality standards by Triumph and sold by Kawasaki dealers at Wun-Hung-Lo prices won't change much. The NC750 fits my current needs as someone who travels by motorcycle, its in effect a superscooter in disguise (he says putting his tin hat on)

I will of course be happy to borrow your magnificently soul inspiring Kawa for the purposes of comparison to my memories of the Guzzi should we meet on a sunny day. You can play "find what'll fit in the helmet locker" and explain ninety three times a day where the petrol goes and how the engine isn't literally half of one from a Honda Spazz.

The W800 remains on my list of bikes I want to own should my ability to pick the correct six numbers improve. I'd have another V7 for nice days too, but I think the W might be the better choice to use.

Andy
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  #42  
Old 7 Aug 2016
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I simply could not resist - so eventually got my 1979 Guzzi tourer / travel bike back together and up and running well. I do like Guzzi's maybe more than any other bike. Not because they are better they are not in any way but they do have something about them that just grabs you a bit.

Like i said in an earlier post in this thread Guzzi build is somewhat variable even when new in the 70's.

So my Guzzi Spada for you young un's - an old blokie bike maybe - low compression big twin , 949cc air cooled, 70 to 80 bhp(so they claim when new i reckon less now) , massive torque from tickover, fairing, panniers, linked rear pedal operated brakes (exceptional) she does average over 50 mpg, 220 mile tank range, has shaft drive.
Everything is simple to service and repair and easy to get at (you need that as you will need to repair her somewhere along the road. She has no nonsense like fuel pumps, electronic gadgets (does have a clock and voltmeter though).

She handles very well and weighs 210kg. Lights are poor - fairing brilliant better than most modern stuff, lots of room on the seat for two. Not good off the road though. (suspension is typical good handling - firm Italian of the day.

So a very relaxing and low revving bike to ride she has an understated maybe slightly odd look, but is functional, practical.

But as an Italian lady, 37 years old she will be good company - if not a little temperamental at times i am sure.

skål - Jake.
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Last edited by Jake; 7 Aug 2016 at 09:27.
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  #43  
Old 14 Aug 2016
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The 1000 SP is probably one of the best Guzzis from that era. Great bike! Had one too, rebuilt for classic racing purposes.
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