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Light Overland Vehicle Tech Tech issues, tips and hints, prepping for travel
Under 3500kg vehicles, e.g. Land Cruiser, Land Rover, Subaru etc.
Photo by Ellen Delis, Lagunas Ojos del Campo, Antofalla, Catamarca

I haven't been everywhere...
but it's on my list!


Photo by Ellen Delis,
Lagunas Ojos del Campo,
Antofalla, Catamarca



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  #16  
Old 12 Feb 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roamingyak.org View Post

Personally I'd take a more commonly used overland vehicle as it will retain its resale value, much easier to sort things out, all the mods and extra bits are tried and tested and easy to buy - plus my landy was a real babe magnet! ;-p
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I must have missed the part where Dave mentioned he was selling the vehicle, so he should be careful about the resale value.
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I would hesitate a guess and say that the German Mercedes running gear, would in turn, be far more reliable than the Solihul stuff.
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Little correction needed here------"Babe magnet" read that as "Thieving barstuard magnet". There is nothing like an old Land Rover to attract the thieves - the world over-

vette
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  #17  
Old 12 Feb 2013
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I mean't if you buy a Toyota, spend some money on it, do the trip, then it is usually still worth what you paid/spent on it if in ok condition. This is less likely to apply to a lesser known vehicle. Just letting Dave know another way to approach it.

Over 200,000km in Africa and never had a even slightly serious breakdown or a theft. Sorry your experiences differ.
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  #18  
Old 12 Feb 2013
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I think I have made my mind up and will take the Korando. Not really worried about resale value. When all the mods have been completed the total cost will be under 3 thousand. For 3 thousand realistically what other vehicle could I get with diff locks on both axles along with all the other mods and a quality Mercedes engine? I also forgot to mention that it is almost 100% corrosion free having been stored in a garage since new and the best thing is I payed under £1000 for it. So for the same money what other vehicle would give me the same offroad performance and quality / reliability for the money?

I don't mean to offend anyone but really not a fan of landrovers that much. I have had a few friends who owned them in the past and always had problems with reliability. As for the Toyota landcruiser don't really know anything about them, although from what I read they are indestructible and reliable, although expensive to buy and you need a mortgage for the fuel! The only other option I had considered was a Mercedes G wagon. I have to say I have 100% respect for this vehicle and if money was no object I would go out and buy the best example that I could. In my opinion it is a purely awesome vehicle, however trying to find one with a tidy body for the right price is very hard. Most of the G wagons i have seen the bodies have been neglected but still go for around 4k on Ebay (I would want a diesel)

So for a cheap overland capable vehicle I am coming to the conclusion that I may be better off with what I have. Is this a fair assessment or am I barking mad
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  #19  
Old 12 Feb 2013
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Originally Posted by roamingyak.org View Post
Ah no, most are caused by driving for long periods on bad roads in hot conditions. Things wear out as they are often designed to. The faster you drive the quicker these things will happen.

What you experienced in your 2 month trip is perhaps not the best sum of knowledge to make broad assertions on.

I think google translates one of your trip updates as saying you were driving at 130km p/h in Africa? Seems very 'smooth' to me!
I will soon start here @ Hubb with our travel-diary in english, on a daily base. This may help to understand many details a bit better.

To go soft yet fast is not a contradiction.

To drive the same trip in 6 months, with the same kilometers, same driving style - why should the experience be worse with the car? Because he has some more resting days between?

You can find many travelers who wrote a blog, that they had breakdown in Africa (mostly suspension). They always mentioned the bad roads - but... Bad roads and driving slowly - don't kill a suspension.

You have to do a suspension setup which is able to handle the weight you will load - and is rated for the weight. And which suits your driving style.

When you drive smooth - there is no reason why a car should not reach the cape - without breakdowns.

For driving smooth you have to read the road, to be concentrated. So your speed matches the road condition - you see potholes before you hit them - you are able to adjust your speed to the environment.

When you drive smooth all other car and other equipment is less stressed..

Yes: you can also have breakdowns which aren't happens because of abusing - but they don't happens often.

Surfy
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  #20  
Old 13 Feb 2013
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Surfy, go and do a proper African trip rather than a short rally (2 months!) and then hit us with your well earned wisdom after that. I have spent more days camping in African workshops talking to mechanics, locals and travellers than you spent on your entire trip. Maybe its our differing English, but you come across in some of your postings as being a bit smug because you have recently managed to drive across Africa in near record time without experiencing much of it at all (though I'm sure you feel you did). Your making broad assertions based on little experience from what I have seen.

Anyway, lets stop polluting somebody else's request for information on a different topic.

Last edited by roamingyak.org; 13 Feb 2013 at 03:46.
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  #21  
Old 16 Feb 2013
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The koranda , is quite capable of making the trip , and knowing (lived) with your vehicle is a big plus , you will be aware of any weak points (pretty well any vehicle has them) , a lot even get added by preparers!! Dont push its GVW is the biggest thing to watch , as many travellers overload their vehicle m and then blame it when things break . Dont over prep the vehicle , a single lock diff in rear is more than adequate , the front one is only usable in limited circumstances , and will just get you in further , and make the extraction harder, its best to use the rear locker to get you out backwards rather than trying too hard to go the intended route . I also find that i used my winch more often to get others out than for my own recovery . I have to repeat , watch you GVW as the Koranda is not a big vehicle , even a 110 can only realistically travel long distances with 2 crew , same with L/C . Dont overtyre as you will strain transmission components . JMHO
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  #22  
Old 16 Feb 2013
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David,

you are well and truly barking mad - as are all of us.

So let us know of your travel tales, we're eager to hear; no matter how long you take.
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  #23  
Old 17 Feb 2013
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Originally Posted by tacr2man View Post
The koranda , is quite capable of making the trip , and knowing (lived) with your vehicle is a big plus , you will be aware of any weak points (pretty well any vehicle has them) , a lot even get added by preparers!! Dont push its GVW is the biggest thing to watch , as many travellers overload their vehicle m and then blame it when things break . Dont over prep the vehicle , a single lock diff in rear is more than adequate , the front one is only usable in limited circumstances , and will just get you in further , and make the extraction harder, its best to use the rear locker to get you out backwards rather than trying too hard to go the intended route . I also find that i used my winch more often to get others out than for my own recovery . I have to repeat , watch you GVW as the Koranda is not a big vehicle , even a 110 can only realistically travel long distances with 2 crew , same with L/C . Dont overtyre as you will strain transmission components . JMHO
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That's a new one.
I thought I knew Korando's pretty well.
They don't have a locking rear diff.
And they most certainly don't have a front locking diff.
And to be honest,, by putting a good sized BFG All Terrain on, say around 255 x 85 x R16, then the Korando doesn't need the rear diff lock, or the front diff lock any way.
Some folk think the Korando is some sort of useless piece of junk, well there not, they are pretty agile.
What I would do, is remove the front hubs, vacuum lines to the locking hubs.
As you know Korando's, you will know about the fronts vacuum pipes etc.
Fit some AVM manual locking hubs.
I got a pair for my brother, for his Korando, let me know if you want the numbers atc.
Then for most of the way, you drive in standard 2 wheel drive, with the front locking hubs, free wheeling.
I would wind up the front torsion beam bolts, to give an extra 25mm.
Can't remember if you already said you were replacing the rear coils with LR stuff. Good swap.
I don't know the condition of your front, under engine skid plate, you can't really call it any thing else, as it's only 0.5mm tin plate.
But you may want to pull it off, and replace it with say the same shape, extend it a bit to the rear, but make it out of 1.00mm plate.
It's not super thick, but really will give just that bit more protection, without being too heavy.

vette
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  #24  
Old 17 Feb 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uk_vette View Post
.
.
That's a new one.
I thought I knew Korando's pretty well.
They don't have a locking rear diff.
And they most certainly don't have a front locking diff.
And to be honest,, by putting a good sized BFG All Terrain on, say around 255 x 85 x R16, then the Korando doesn't need the rear diff lock, or the front diff lock any way.
Some folk think the Korando is some sort of useless piece of junk, well there not, they are pretty agile.
What I would do, is remove the front hubs, vacuum lines to the locking hubs.
As you know Korando's, you will know about the fronts vacuum pipes etc.
Fit some AVM manual locking hubs.
I got a pair for my brother, for his Korando, let me know if you want the numbers atc.
Then for most of the way, you drive in standard 2 wheel drive, with the front locking hubs, free wheeling.
I would wind up the front torsion beam bolts, to give an extra 25mm.
Can't remember if you already said you were replacing the rear coils with LR stuff. Good swap.
I don't know the condition of your front, under engine skid plate, you can't really call it any thing else, as it's only 0.5mm tin plate.
But you may want to pull it off, and replace it with say the same shape, extend it a bit to the rear, but make it out of 1.00mm plate.
It's not super thick, but really will give just that bit more protection, without being too heavy.

vette

the o/p was the one suggesting fitting locking diffs
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  #25  
Old 19 Feb 2013
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Originally Posted by tacr2man View Post
the o/p was the one suggesting fitting locking diffs
Dif locks are not hub locks.

vette
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  #26  
Old 6 Jan 2019
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Originally Posted by david151 View Post
I am planning a 2 year trip in 2015 where I plan to travel down the westcoast of Africa and then back up the east coast. At the moment I own a 1998 Ssangyong korando and am seriously thinking of fitting out the vehicle for the trip. As it stands I have done a few basic mods to the vehicle:

1) Suspension lift using landrover discovery springs on the back and heavy duty iron man torsion bar on the front complete with l iron man shocks all round. I currently run 31" tyres, however it will take bigger.
2) done away with the unreliable vacuum hubs and installed AVM manual hubs
Over the next year I plan to do the following mods:
3) fit Eaton E lockers or ARB airlockers to front and rear axels (haven't decided which type to go for yet)
4) Replace the transfer box with a permanent 4 wheel drive box from a GX220 musso .
5) Custom make roof rack / roll cage
6) fit winch bumper
7) fit snorkel

Although the vehicle may seem an odd choice it does have the fantastic Mercedes 602 engine (2.9 Diesel) so can't see parts for this being a problem in Africa. I have to say I absolutely love the engine as I get amazing mileage and it runs on just about anything. I have seen plenty of people fit these engines to Mercedes G wagons so they can't be that bad.

I would be interested to hear what people think of my choice. Is it a crazy choice or do you think it will be a good vehicle for Africa when I have finished all my mods?
Hello can you please help.
Wich rear spring that you used to lift korando?
Thank you
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