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  #1  
Old 1 Feb 2022
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Thoughts on windshield extenders?

What are your thoughts on the type of wind deflectors that attaches to the top of the wind shield? How well do they perform (wind, water, visibility, vibrations)? How about durability? Do they ruin the original screen? How about theft - do they really get stolen? Will the mounts for the original screen be able to withstand the extra wind forces put on it? Any other important consciderations to think about?

What would be the pros and cons of just getting a larger wind screen instead and just "be done with it"? Maybe an adjustable screen?

Personally I like the idea of being able to have a short windshield when riding under difficult conditions where visibility over the wind screen is critical. I also like to have a short windscreen when it is hot and the going is slow. It is only when it is cold, wet, or I travel fast that I like the extra protection. I also think that most larger windscreens look terrible on the types of bikes that I have.

Please share your thoughts. If you have any reccomendations of particular makes and models, please share links.

MRA X-creen make adjustable ones in both clamp on and bolt on versions - but I know nothing about them.

I'm getting older, and creature comforts are becoming increasingly more important.

Some specifics:

The bikes I conscider improved wind deflection for is a Yamaha Tenere 700 and a KTM 390 Adventure. The T7's original is quite good for a stock windshield, even for a rider my height (186 cm), but I still want more. The 390 Adventure my girlfriend's bike (175 cm), and is vastly inadequate even for her height.

I live in Norway where most of the main roads has a speed limit of 80 or below, with only a few roads having stretches of uppwards to 110/kmh. On my longer trips I prefer to travel on the slower roads anyways.

In the past I've never really had a great need for wind protection beyond the original set up. I never found it to be great, just decent enough that I could live with it. But, I am getting older with an incresed desire for creature comforts. Better wind deflection would now be largely welcomed - even at 60 km/h - especially on cold or wet days (a lot of that in Norway).
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Old 1 Feb 2022
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On winter trips from the UK to Morocco you tend to get a real mix of weather ranging from below zero whilst crossing Spain, then sometimes 30ºC or more in southern Morocco where a high screen is positively dangerous when riding offroad.

A clamp-on deflector is a really good idea for cold weather or if you experience buffeting—a major problem for many KTM 790/890 owners. You could always remove the deflector when working hard riding offroad in high temperatures, but my deflector tilts to allow increased windflow, so I keep it in place.

My Spanish-based KTM 690R has a so-called 'touring windshield' which is tiny, so I originally bought my Darkojak deflector seven years ago to provide more wind protection. During the pandemic I 'borrowed' it for my UK-based KTM 790S and you can see some photos of it here.

There are many deflectors on eBay in the UK. Non height-adjustable and non tiltable ones start from under £20. Some of these deflectors only have a central support but the Dakojak has supports each side which makes it rigid and takes the mechanism out of direct line of sight. This one at £50 appears to be a Darkojak.

Your questions...
How well do they perform (wind, water, visibility, vibrations)? Excellent for me
How about durability? Seven years old
Do they ruin the original screen? No
How about theft - do they really get stolen? Not so far
Will the mounts for the original screen be able to withstand the extra wind forces put on it? The T7 and KTM 390 screens should be OK
Attached Thumbnails
Thoughts on windshield extenders?-darkojak.jpg  

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Last edited by Tim Cullis; 1 Feb 2022 at 12:23.
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Old 1 Feb 2022
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheelie View Post
What are your thoughts on the type of wind deflectors that attaches to the top of the wind shield?
The secret is that they are not actually *extenders* - they are, as you said, *deflectors*. They are most useful to direct the flow of air where you need it... and if you are tall enough that you can't completely hide behind your high windshield, then the extra bit is not to *raise* the airflow but to *redirect* it directly into your helmet. Because flowing air is much quieter and easier on your neck than turbulent air!

So... Use your hand while riding to find the bottom edge of the turbulent windflow coming off the top of your windshield. Just move your hand up and down, it will be obvious where that border is. If it's below the tip of your helmet, then you want the extender pointed "down", i.e. *the top edge of the extender should be pointing directly at your visor*. This will create a flow of smooth air towards your helmet, while the windshield keeps the wind pressure off of your chest.

Quote:
How well do they perform (wind, water, visibility, vibrations)? How about durability?
Entirely depends on how much money you spend on it. I had an MRSA X-Screen that worked wonderfully, even at high speeds. I also had an aliexpress one that looked identical, but was crap - wouldn't stay in place, would vibrate to hell.

Quote:
Do they ruin the original screen?
Some require you to drill through the screen. The MRSA X-Screen doesn't - it has friction options where you use screws to push pieces of rubber against the screen - and at worst, that will leave some marks you can buff out.

Quote:
How about theft - do they really get stolen?
Can't imagine they ever would be.

Quote:
Will the mounts for the original screen be able to withstand the extra wind forces put on it?
In my experience, yes.
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  #4  
Old 1 Feb 2022
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Cullis View Post
My Spanish-based KTM 690R has a so-called 'touring windshield' which is tiny, so I originally bought my Darkojak deflector seven years ago to provide more wind protection.
Ooh, I like the slidey mechanism on those.
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  #5  
Old 1 Feb 2022
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I made mine by trial and error, recutting and adjusting them until they pushed the air over my head and (on one bike) stopped the top of the screen whistling from air passing over it, bottle top style. Not as pretty as commercial deflectors but then neither are the bikes they're on.

Without them air from the sub eye line screens hits me straight in the face. The screen on my GoldWing is higher than my eye line and deflects all the air straight over my head on its own, but it doesn't take much in the way of dirt / insects / rain (or a combination of them) to make the screen too dirty to see through. The screen is an higher aftermarket addition but given a choice I'd prefer a lower one with a deflector.
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  #6  
Old 1 Feb 2022
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Cullis View Post
On winter trips from the UK to Morocco you tend to get a real mix of weather ranging from below zero whilst crossing Spain, then sometimes 30ºC or more in southern Morocco where a high screen is positively dangerous when riding offroad.
origin
Very true.

Once crossing the High Atlas we got caught in a snow storm, wearing every piece of clothing, including rain gear - it was like out of the movie Dumb & Dumber.

A few days later, it was so hot it was like being hit with a space heater - the faster we rode, the hotter it felt on the skin - again with the need to dress up. I never thought a wind screen could actually aid in keeping you cool before getting hit by dry air way above my body own temp.

I didn't have a significant screen at the time - visibility on rough terrain trumphs comfort.

Thanks for all the great info from all of you. It is really useful!
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  #7  
Old 1 Feb 2022
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The CB500X was an aerodynamic disaster to me. Fitting the deflector made it worse. Best solution was to remove the screen entirely. Wasted far too long raising, lowering, spacing, adding the deflector, spacing that..

Found a better use for it though



Andy
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  #8  
Old 2 Feb 2022
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheelie View Post
A few days later, it was so hot it was like being hit with a space heater - the faster we rode, the hotter it felt on the skin - again with the need to dress up. I never thought a wind screen could actually aid in keeping you cool before getting hit by dry air way above my body own temp.
Sounds like it was 40ºC or more, as you say the air burns the skin and it's time to close the visor. The other temperature I can assess without a thermometer is 28ºC (82ºF) which for me is when wind chill ceases to work and you can ride in just a t-shirt if you wish.
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  #9  
Old 2 Feb 2022
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Thanks for all your comments.

The following is my desctop assessment - I have no first hand experience with the solutions I discuss (but I have spendt many hours researching and discussing in many channels). I recognize that I generalize and that mileage will vary greatly depending on tastes, needs, type of bike, other bike mods, etc, etc. Take it for what it is worth - I am no expert in this field.
  1. Clip Ons work decent enough - a first go to solution for dealing with air flow problems. It is inexpensive, quick and dirty, and often delivers more than adequate results. If it doesn't, it could likely still be used in combination with an upgraded main screen for a combined effect. And unlike a tall fixed screen, it can be removed off road (for best possible visibility as well as added safety against getting your face and neck cut up in the event of a crash).
  2. Shy away from center mounted clip ons - this as they block view where it counts the most - beter with two mounts, one at either side of the screen
  3. Adjustability: up, down, inwards and outwards, plus tilt - is the way to go in pursuit of optimal wind deflection. It might not look as good though, and will cost more.
  4. Heed warnings - take the damn thing off when riding offroad. Not only for better visibility, but to avoid planting your face onto it - especially when standing up
  5. Having an adjustable main screen in place, or in addtion to a clip on, might deliver the best results and convenience (more on that on a bit)
  6. MRA, Puig, Powerbronze - are great options for the T7 - both for screens and deflectors (more on that in a bit).
  7. Acrylic is the way to go, even it is far more brittle than polycarbonate, and therefore brakes easier. But, it is far more scratch resistant, it doesn't yellow, and you can buff out scratches easy.
  8. You want screen thickness to be at least 3 mm, preferably 4mm, especially if you go for acrylic (3mm seems to be the standard)
  9. Clip Ons don't really get stolen all that often

Adjustable brackets for main screen
On e-bay, and a thousand other places, you can find brackets enabling you to elevate your stock screen - without the use of tools. The solution does however leave a large gap at the bottom when the screen is at the elevated position. Some report that this can cause the air bubble to collapse, cause more turbulance (or in worse ways), and can also reduce the height above the screen which the air gets directed. Some report changes in turbulance causing rain to actually be pushed downwards - into everything from through helmet opening, and/or down the front of the neck (soaking you from the inside out), or pooling up at the crotch and seat - all leaving the rider miserable. Others report wonderful results.

In my opinion, I really just don't like how they make the bike look, especially with the screen elevated. It looks like a hack job to me.

MRA
MRA offers an adjustable main screen for some bike models that is simply awesome. Not only is it easy to operate, but it doesn't leave the large gap at the bottom end which a lot of other solutions does.

The contours of MRA screens, looks to me to be more technically advanced than most other options out there. Most other options lack a lip/spolier contour at top, which helps blast the wind high (a tried and tested concept by bike manufacturers for a very long time). Most others have a straight vertical contour with no lip - which to some may look more sleek, and which probably is simpler to manufacture (cheaper). Hondas, Yamahas and BMW's alike would often have this lip on many adventure and offroad bikes with short screens. Maybe that is why many don't offer the look anymore - because it looks to 90's (forgetting that it offerred some performance improvements - atleast on those bikes that aimed to get it right in the 90*s simply didn't just add them to make the bike look modern?).

Sadly MRA doesn't offer an adjustable main screen for the Tenere 700 - only fixed screens and a clip on defelctor. They do however offer adjustable brackets similar to those that you can find on fleabay. If I was to go down this rout (which I won't, for the reasons mentioned above), I would simply use my stock screen and buy cheap brackets from wherever.

The fixed screens from MRA looks awesome, but the added length would not be desireable offroad (heeding Tim Cullins's warnings).

MRA does in my opinion offer the best clip on technology, with every desireable adjustment and the easiest operation of the lot. If I am to get a clip on for my T7, it will probably be an MRA.

The MRA has in my opinion the better looking screens - or does Powerbronze? I can't decide. I like the sleek straight and modern look of Powerbronze, but I also like the more technical contoured look of the MRA. The MRA contoured lip looks more 90's or early 2000, wheras the straight looks more futuristic. The first looks more functional, the latter just... "looks". The MRA screens seem to have kept the original design of the bike in mind - not going too crazy. The same goes for PowerBronze.

PowerBronze
Offers an adjustable screen for the T7 (and more adventure bikes than the other manufacturers - or so it seems). Their screens look sexy, retaining the original look of the bike - atleast the T7.

Their adjustment mechanism doesn't seem as easy to operate as the ones from MRA. But, if MRA doesn't have an adjustable screen for your bike, then Powerbronze might your best choice. The same goes for their clip on deflectors.

With the adjustable screen from PB, you can keep your screen low off road, and elevate it when you cruise at high speeds - without leaving a huge gap at the bottom. Combined with a removable clip on for added height and improved deflection - this might offer the best of all worlds. Personally I would conscider getting the main screen from PB and the deflector from MRA (unless MRA should soon produce an adjustable screen for the T7, upon which I would likely get both from MRA).

Puig
Puig seems to provide awesome and good looking kits. But in my opinion, Powerbronze and MRA has it beat by a smidgeon.

Madstad
Has a decent kit, with a look that I can't say if I hate or love - it deviates too much from the original design of my T7, without adding anny real technical advances relative to the competition - not as far as I can see anyways.

My likely choice
I'm leaning towards getting a clip on from MRA and see how far it takes me. If not enough, I will likely get an adjustable screen from PowerBronze and see how far that takes me (with or without the combined effect of the MRA). If that doen't do the job, I will likely get a fixed touring screen from MRA in combination with the clip on. It will surely add more height than I like, but I will allways have the option to switch back to the original screen for trips where it is especially important to have the lower screen.
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  #10  
Old 2 Feb 2022
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Cullis View Post
A clamp-on deflector is a really good idea for cold weather or if you experience buffeting - a major problem for many KTM 790/890 owners.
I've ridden my 790 with high and low screens, with and without lower deflectors, and yes there is buffeting noise, but I've also ridden a variety of blood bikes with screens, and they buffet too. On KTM owners pages I've seen reports of people trying other screens and they also buffet. My conclusion is any screen aims to send the air over the rider's head, but it then descends on their head vertically, and that's what makes the helmet noise. The best you can do is reduce it, and wear earplugs.

As such, yes, clip-on screens do work in that they deflect the air a bit further up without increasing the screen height. I have a Puig one and it's quite effective, though nothing eliminates the buffeting entirely. It's firmly fixed with allen screws and I can't see anybody nicking it in a hurry.

Note I own two screens, a low one for rides likely to contain off road work (and this is probably the one I'll use across Asia despite the extra wind blast to the face) and a high one with Puig clip-on for road touring.
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Old 2 Feb 2022
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A while back I owned a Vespa GTS 300 that came with an illegally tall screen (couldn't look over it). I could sit somfortably and smoke a cigarette on that thing, doing over a 100 km/h. But if it started raining or snowing, or the sun was low in the sky - it was all guesswork as of where the road was.

The aim for me is not to get rid of wind, noice and buffeting - if so, I can just get into my car and get full climate control.

When it is cold or wet, it is nice to be able to deflect a bit more of the weather off ones torso and visor - without having to tuck down low. Also, to get rid of a noticeable ammount of noise and buffeting would be nice. If I could deflect more bugs and rain drops off the visor, that would be great also.

I don't expect any magical results where I can ride without ear plugs or even eye protection, nor rain gear or even heated gear on the coldest days - it is all part of the experience of riding a motorcycle and is to be expected. I wouldn't bother making a change for any lower than a "10%" improvement, but anything higher is worth the investment. I would be a little bummed out if I couldn't achieve more than "10%", but it would still be worth it. If I could cut the "bad" in half, I would be extatic. Anything inbetween would be quite satisfactory. As of what gains to expect, I have no idea.
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Old 2 Feb 2022
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This is an interesting topic for me as I spent ages trying to find a solution for the 790, using small and large screens in both high and low positions, and also no screen at all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomkat View Post
I've ridden my 790 with high and low screens, with and without lower deflectors, and yes there is buffeting noise, but I've also ridden a variety of blood bikes with screens, and they buffet too. On KTM owners pages I've seen reports of people trying other screens and they also buffet. My conclusion is any screen aims to send the air over the rider's head, but it then descends on their head vertically, and that's what makes the helmet noise. The best you can do is reduce it, and wear earplugs.
Just to be clear for anyone reading this, we are not talking about a steady windblast but rather a situation where the helmet is getting shaken from side to side, your vision might blur and the journey becomes distinctly unpleasant to the extent that it puts you off going for a ride. It's like the effect when a backseat passenger in a car opens the window, but on steroids. Not everyone is affected the same, there might be some influences from rider height, seat height and the helmet they are wearing.

One tip I've read is to remove the winglets underneath the headlight. I've not tried that as my deflector solution works for me, but the suggestion may be to do with reducing the negative air pressure behind the screen. Others suggest removing the handguards, or even the mirrors which seems a bit extreme

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheelie View Post
The solution does however leave a large gap at the bottom when the screen is at the elevated position.
The gap between the screen and the deflector is exactly for the purpose of adjusting the pressure behind the screen. And as long as your deflector is adjustable you can move it around to get the best result. The reverse curve at the top of some third party screens might also be intended to reduce negative pressure behind the screen.

Here's a 790/890 thread showing an MRA deflector. My first impressions are that this combination is too tall, but then the guy is 6'2" with a long torso.
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Last edited by Tim Cullis; 2 Feb 2022 at 17:26.
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  #13  
Old 2 Feb 2022
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Seems like it is more difficult to deal with wind on the 790 than to make this offroad suitable.

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Old 29 Mar 2022
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I am riding now for decades an never used windshield.
But may be the reason is, i don't go on german autobahn with 200 km/h.


Most of the windscreens guide the air precisely to the helmet. (if you are tall)
That makes a lot of noise and can make turbulence as well.


I prefer to ride without a windsreen and enjoy some wind arround my nose.
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