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Camping Equipment and all Clothing Tents, sleeping bags, stoves etc. Riding clothing, boots, helmets, what to wear when not riding, etc.
Photo by Igor Djokovic, camping above San Juan river, Arizona USA

I haven't been everywhere...
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Photo by Igor Djokovic,
camping above San Juan river,
Arizona USA




Poll: Which is most economical to cook with for multifuel stoves?
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Which is most economical to cook with for multifuel stoves?

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  #136  
Old 25 Dec 2017
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I misunderstood the question...

I was going to say Porridge and the back stain is still bonded to a Trangia hard anodised pan.

I also managed to melt the aluminium layer from a DuoSSAL pan using if to heat a tiny espresso pot as I forgot the old mountain bike brake disc I use as a trivet.

Ahh fuel... I use "panel wipe" which is naptha and n-Heptane.
Smells and burns the same as Coleman White Gas but I can get a 5L can for less than the cost of 2 1L plastic bottles of Coleman fuel.

Panel wipe is used in car paint spray / bodyshops, thankfully I have a spray shop supply place near me.
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  #137  
Old 2 Jan 2018
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In my multi fuel stoves ive used white gas/Coleman, auto gas and kerosene.
I started using auto gas on motorcycle trips. It works ok, but produces a lot of soot and the jet needs cleaning more often. The kerosene i only used in the garage for a test run.
A few yrs ago i switched to using an alcohol stove. I find it smaller lighter and simpler.

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  #138  
Old 13 Jan 2018
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I have used gasoline and white gas (Coleman fuel). Like others have said, gasoline is convenient but a bit messy and generates more soot.


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  #139  
Old 13 Jan 2018
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Camp stove Fuel

I have two stoves, a Camping Gaz single burner that takes either the approx. 0.5 ltr size or 2 0.25 stacked. Its quick and efficient, but very slow to boil and you have to build quite a wind guard around it.
The other is my favourite, single burner folding MSR and .75 ltr fuel bottle. In the US I buy Colemans fuel. I've burnt both kerosene ( you need to change the jet out for the spare one in the kit) and mineral spritis in Aus/NZ etc.
They all burn very hot, and the stove is low profile , comes with a sheet of very thick aluminium strip that easily folds into wind guard.
A little slower to start up, but once running its brilliant. I can cook breakfast for two, coffee, eggs, bacon and toast in about 15mins.
Michael
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  #140  
Old 14 Apr 2018
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Moved back to a meth burning Trangia years ago.

Those Coleman things are terrible. Ferocious things with no control.
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  #141  
Old 4 Aug 2018
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Pressure cooker rec

Yes, great for high altitude, and I carry my Peak1 multifuel in it. My pressure cooker is a little British Skyline. I love it but you can't get them anymore. those of you in the UK may find them at garage sales or whatever. - good luck, from Alberta, Canada
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  #142  
Old 28 Aug 2020
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcwhirtj View Post
I have used gasoline and white gas (Coleman fuel). Like others have said, gasoline is convenient but a bit messy and generates more soot.


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I have recently bought a Coleman 442 and it's great. Good simmer control and will work at any temperature, any altitude. Nearly as easy as a gas canister stove. I use either Aspen 4 as a fuel or Stihl Moto4 plus. These are the same as Coleman fuel and less than half the price per litre. No stink and no soot. Petrol is ok as a temporary measure, but will eventually clog the generator.
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  #143  
Old 28 Aug 2020
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As well as a Coleman 442 I have a "compact kit" comprising a Soto Amicus, 100g gas canister, lighter, Optimus windhield, and a GSI Minimalist pot/mug. Stove, gas, lighter, and holder fit inside the pot, and the windshield is strapped around it. This works well in most conditions, and take up very little space.
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Multi fuel stove users: what have you burnt?-minimalist-1.jpg  

Multi fuel stove users: what have you burnt?-minimalist-2.jpg  

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  #144  
Old 4 Sep 2020
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Trangia meths stove every time.
Wouldn't use anything else.
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  #145  
Old 2 Nov 2021
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrinceHarley View Post
Trangia meths stove every time.
Wouldn't use anything else.
Why?
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  #146  
Old 2 Nov 2021
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grant Johnson View Post
Why?
Fuel is easy to obtain.
No empty gas canisters to dispose of. (they don't recycle).
Nice gentle flame, minimal chance of burning food.
Slow-cooking... contemplative?
Nothing to go wrong with the hardware.
Lightweight.
Staggeringly robust.
Fuel can be (reasonably) safely used to encourage campfires.

You ask 'why?'
I ask 'why ever not?'
There really isn't a downside to Trangias.
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  #147  
Old 2 Feb 2022
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I like alcohol stoves for all the same reasons, but...

With no valve to shut off fuel, they are not legal in US forests under extreme fire conditions.

If that alcohol spills, it can be impossible to put out. Spills of burning fuel are more likely from very lightweight, and somewhat unstable soda pop can stoves than the Trangia but (I think) still possible.

I have had spills twice from my alcohol stoves (despite being extremely careful with them). Water just spreads the fire.

............shu
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  #148  
Old 23 Jul 2022
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Question Camping gas in South America

Hello good motorbike folks,

I'm shipping my motorbike out to Chile to do the Ushuaia - Alaska run for 3 years from October 2022 to 2025. A cursory online search shows that a threaded 450g propane camping gas canister runs about $27 in Argentina (in Europe I can get them for about $7 -$8). I use gas canisters to make my coffee and porridge in the mornings mostly.

Has anyone toured here recently and could give me any tips about availability of camping gas canisters and if the price I found is indicative of gas canister prices there?

I wild camp 98% of the time and also have a collapsible "twig" stove that burns small pieces of wood and, well, twigs! It also includes a meths / spirit burner which I have carried for 3 years so far and never used (but I will if the gas is SOOO expensive!).

Finally, I also have a 110v single element electric cooker for when I have an electrical outlet (overkill, I know!)

Mostly though, I dig a Dakota firehole (when safe conditions allow) which leaves no trace and also carry a BBQ grill to cook on. I only say all this to save you time from recommending other alternative cooking gadgets, like JETBOILS and Coleman petrol stoves.

Well, enough of that. If you have any experience with buying gas in South America, I would really appreciate your help.

Thanks in advance,
Steve.

@FREEDOMRTW
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