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Photo by Michael Jordan, enjoying a meal at sunset, Zangskar Valley, India

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Photo by Michael Jordan
enjoying a meal at sunset,
Zangskar Valley, India



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  #1  
Old 30 Jun 2010
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Which K-bike

This might seem an odd one for HUBB, but given the collective knowledge here I'm guessing someone might have some ideas. I'm looking to get a little more speed and carrying ability on the outfit and have seen a number of K-100 and K1100 based outfits, especially pictures of what the Australians get up to that makes me think this is a good option. I might start another thread over on "what bike" about the other options I've thought of, but for now I wondered if anyone might know:

What's the difference in real life use between the K100 and K1100?
Any serious issues to think about/look for?
Did they all have ABS as built?
What do people do in terms of standard mods, shocks, tyres etc?
What's the standard range?
Anyone had any hassle in the cold?
Is parts availability from Motorworks and MotoBinns still there even for a 25 year old bike? Anything you can't get?

Really anything useful you can think of about these bikes in general really (and no, I don't want a KTM/R1200GS/Ducati or anything else, that'll be for the "what bike" thread ). Weight and possibly Bricklike handling as a solo don't worry me, this beast would be getting a shopping trolly nailed on the side to stop it falling over

Thanks

Andy
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  #2  
Old 30 Jun 2010
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16-valve bikes (late 1000'S & all 1100's) have a bit more midrange & topend than the 8-valve 1000's. The 750's are basically a 1000 with a cylinder missing and a 120 degree crank (think modern Triumph, not early Laverda triple with a 180 crank) and are reckoned to be the smoothest of the bunch.

16-valve bikes tend to come with a Paralever rear end and some have slightly wider 3-spoke wheels.

1000's are easier to service when it comes to the valves, you just need a tool £35-£40) for depressing the shim bucket to allow removal of the shim without disturbing the cams or cam timing - very easy.

With 1100's you need to remove the cams to adjust the valve clearances. There's no shim as such, I believe the the bucket acts as the shim as the bottom of the bucket is of varying thickness a la shims & it's the complete bucket that you replace if needed.

The ABS is a more compact unit on 1100's also, There's also very minor differences in fork stanchion diameter & spline size in the transmission that may or may not relate to age rather than capacity? Paralever swingarms can be retrofitted to earlier bikes as long as you swap the gearbox as well, may also need the matching clutch pushrod?
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  #3  
Old 1 Jul 2010
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My K100 RT doesn't have ABS. It was an expensive option at the time.
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  #4  
Old 3 Jul 2010
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You will not ride a solo at temperatures that may complicate driving for you... so that is no an issue.

Parts are readily available from:
Motorworks - BMW Motorcycle Spares - home
Moto-bins - BMW Spare Parts and Accessories for Motorcycles - Index
James Sherlock BMW Used Parts (Brigton area?)
Part problem is not an isse.

K1100 is a better bike says all I speak to.

Both can be "tuned" -
BMW K100 Turbo
RB Racing
k100 turbo - eric2's Photos
etc

Why do you want ABS?...
K1300 have even anti-spin...
...what's next?... Gogomobil anit-tilt struts?!...

1100 have a slightly longer wheelbase, and the seat position is far better if RS/RT fairing is installed; you need to test both models to compare what these differences matters to you.

You will need to have the shock rebuilt to carry more load.
Engans Racing AB, Forsbacka, Sweden, is superior to Öhlins.
You will also need new forksprings.

More speed?...
Isn't 100mph fast enough on a bike with heavy load?...
Do you not have a camera situation on Brittish roads making good bike tempo rather costly?...

Most of a drive is at less than 40mph... a bike that handles well at creaping speeds and low cruising speeds will be less tiresome to drive in the long-run.
If you want high top-speeds, you should look at bikes like Hayabusa, i.e. Japanese bikes...
YouTube - gostrıder
Stockholm-Uppsala (about 70km / 44miles) in 10 minutes!... reckless, stupid, and probably quite a rush.
YouTube - Ghost Rider Uppsala Run
It is easy to drive fast... keeping the vehicle on the road is more difficult... Which is more important, the ride or getting there?...

Drive Safely,
Albert
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Old 4 Jul 2010
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Thanks Albert,

I want more power as the 60 HP I have now is proving tedious with the amount of gear my wife and the dog seem to want. Seems worthwhile going to 90-100 HP and allowing for a trailer at some point! Speed is just a case of not worrying about any road (UK motorways run at 70-80 at times), the Bonneville outfit will run with the flow on any UK road, but when piled high with kit is at 101% so won't like it in the long term. I have another (solo) use for the Bonneville, so it makes sense to go big in one stage.

ABS I would prefer not to have. We have the MOT annual inspection any red flashing light gets a fail. I spent half my working life on ABS systems and on a vehicle I intended to run for a few years would specify it. However, for one I'm thinking I'll keep much longer after modifying it it meet my exact needs, I don't want MOT failures over items I can no longer buy. You can remove ABS from a bike, but then the insurance gets awkward. Having ABS wouldn't stop me buying the right outfit.

The question about the cold relates to our previous discussons about sump heaters and the like. I'm guessing in a real northern winter a K bike would need such things?

Thanks

Andy
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Old 4 Jul 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threewheelbonnie View Post
<SNIP>

Really anything useful you can think of about these bikes in general really (and no, I don't want a KTM/R1200GS/Ducati or anything else, that'll be for the "what bike" thread ). Weight and possibly Bricklike handling as a solo don't worry me, this beast would be getting a shopping trolly nailed on the side to stop it falling over

Thanks

Andy

If you plan on riding solo and loading up on baggage, the K75 will be a better choice than the K1100. Its smoother than the 100...but they're equally robust.

If you plan on attaching a sidecar to the bike, the K1100 is probably your better choice.

Hell many parts between the K75, K100 and K1100 are swappable. The K1100 tranny can be dropped into a K75 easily enough enough-you just have to use a K75 clutch pushrod and not the K1100.

Anyways...the 75/100/1100 are beasts and will offer you many miles to come...especially if you get the final drive rebuilt by Bruno...who elongates the splines...

Bruno's Services Page

HTH
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  #7  
Old 5 Jul 2010
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Hi Andy,

...me and my memory... -
Ok - now I remember and recall previous correspondance -

K-bike = car engine = treat it correspondingly. No problem at temps down to -40'C as with cars.

You are looking at the wrong data... you should look at torque at low revs, not hp (which is at high revs)...
K1100 if you are to use it as a side-rig with trailer.

I -strongly- advice you to adress the shaft issue with "modern" BMW's - since BMW discontinued oil-bath shafts do wear-out and break-down...

What you really want, looking at your added specs, is LONG stroke and LOW revs, i.e. optimized torque over hp. A K will not give you this, but it is strong enough to hurl you down the road with all your load should you twist the throttle - The blinking blue lights in your rear mirror and the shreeking sound is not the sound-barrier - its men in blue trying to catch-up with you -
However, to drive a K-bike is just like driving any Japanese bike... low revs low power, high revs much power - perfect for icy and snowy roads, but tiresome at summer.

So, of the options you presented you have:
K-100 two valves - more durable, but less power.
K-100 four valves - more power, more prone to valve-problems (springs brake)
K-1100 (are all 4-valves?) - much more power than what 100cc would represent.
If you can get a K100 in good condition for 6-800 pounds... not easy to say no to. Should you be able to get a 1100 for 1000-1500 pounds... and that is within budget... you can not turn down the offer -

K-bikes have a standard bosch car alternator - and it is possible to modify it from 50A to 90A if my eyes did not fool me when I worked on a K100 a couple of years back.

I have also started to think about K... K1100LT would suite me well
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Old 5 Jul 2010
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I know of a 1989/1990 K100RS for sale in Maidenhead if you're interested. Belongs to a friend, not used since a recent service & new battery. He's in Australia until Wednesday, let me know if interested.

All 1100's have 4-valve heads BTW.
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