Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Technical, Bike forums > BMW Tech
BMW Tech BMW Tech Forum - For Questions specific and of interest to BMW riders only.
Photo by James Duncan, Universe Camp, Uyuni Salt Flats

I haven't been everywhere...
but it's on my list!


Photo by James Duncan,
"Universe Camp"
Uyuni Salt Flats



Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16  
Old 31 Oct 2013
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: BC, sometimes
Posts: 578
"The Wee-strom is fine with 5000 mile oil changes."

Mine isn't - gets noisier around the 3000 mile point, much improved after an oil change. Oil was knackered when it came out too.

I'll be doing mine as per the maintenance schedule thanks. Filter every 3rd change, as per maintenance schedule. Not sure why some dealers think they know better than the guys that designed, built and tested the bloody things.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 31 Oct 2013
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: West Yorkshire UK
Posts: 1,785
13 years in the automotive industry and we never let a draughty set a service interval. Marketing shout higher higher, aftermarket sales lower lower. The draughtys get left back in their booths playing cad.

Andy
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 31 Oct 2013
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 146
Contrariness

I might set folks off with my take on this thread, but here it is.

I was initially surprised that the issue of having someone else do something to your bike was seen as so 'bad'. The HUBB itself is based on other people doing stuff that others can read about and it seems to be an OK thing.

Maybe the dealer showed the folks how to maintain their chain for the next time. Maybe the mechanic was working to save up to take her own trip and having customers is appreciated. Maybe the dealer was a friend of the motorcycle owner. Maybe the owner had tried to adjust the chain herself and just couldn't get it done right. I realize that I haven't read the other forum where the original post was located so some of this may have been answered. But, I still don't get why its OK to suggest what someone else is doing is cause for a 'can you believe it' type moment. Motorcyclists come in all styles.

Some, looking at the ad on the HUBB don't even adjust their chains (Scottoiler, apparently, works well)

Even Ewan and Charlie who've taken lots of heat have, served to expose lots of others into the world wide motorcycle travel arena.

My experience with HUBB folks over the past 7 years suggests most folks take a 'whatever, as long as you're out there' approach. Which I think is great!
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 31 Oct 2013
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 4,343
There is more than the HUBB

Quote:
Originally Posted by docsherlock View Post
I have just read on another forum about a couple of bikers that take their bikes to the dealer to have the chain adjusted (not replaced, adjusted).
Anyway, back on topic, the dealers should point them toward this website.
It has contained the section linked below for quite some time (+, since this is a Beemer thread, it also has/had a write up about tuning Bing carburettors).
Chain Adjustment + Wheel Alignment | Horizons Unlimited
__________________
Dave
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 1 Nov 2013
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: West Yorkshire UK
Posts: 1,785
Quote:
Originally Posted by STG06 View Post

Some, looking at the ad on the HUBB don't even adjust their chains (Scottoiler, apparently, works well)

Even Ewan and Charlie who've taken lots of heat have, served to expose lots of others into the world wide motorcycle travel arena.

!
Chain adjustment is one of those constant battles between the mechano-fiddlers and the riders. Modern chains and the things that come on Enfields and need boiling up in whale tallow on a Primus stove every 37 yards are entirely different beasts. Likewise, an oiler on a chain that would live without one is somewhere between a comfort blanket to control the voices in the fiddlers head and a source of grinding paste that causes more wear and allows more fiddling. We all find our own balance on that one. Some even take their medicine in huge doses but less frequently with shaft drive.

The E&C debate has been done to death. Lots of interest, lots of second hand R1200GS's about, most of the new recruits clogged up a few "extreme-adventure" rallies for a few years and have now gone back to treating their GS just like they did the Sportsbike before. If they enjoy it, fair enough.

What I think caused the shock (if you can call it that) is that chain adjustment would typically be viewed alongside filling up with petrol and putting air in the tyres. You would have to wonder how anyone who couldn't do this themselves would get more than a few hundred miles from home. Choosing to let a dealer touch a bike is also alien to many here. No one cares more about your bike than you do. Dealers use air tools and no grease and leave things that then can't be undone at the roadside. They install "upgrades" to the fuelling without telling you and make the bike run rough at altitude. They either want to replace additional things they spot like worn brake pads there and then or don't tell you where as the owner would order some and see if they need fitting in a week or two. Above all, dealers cost more. We should maybe thank the people who will pay £50 to get their chain adjusted as they are keeping the mechanics employed until we need them. Unfortunately I suspect their lack of knowledge will lead the dealer to employ chain adjusters who'll be useless when we need a gearbox rebuilt.

Personally I'm currently embracing the throw away culture. Buy a new bike, ride the **** off it, do just enough serving at home to keep it alive until the MOT is due then trade it back to a dealer for another. If it makes it there on trade in day it's mission accomplished. My extra depreciation is less than I'd have paid in dealer service charges. When the ***s stamp up the service book and sell it on to someone who can't afford new it's the dealer doing the dirty on people and if they do believe a dealers salesman that's for them to sort. I'll hand it over with photographs and receipts for every oil and filter change, way better than you'd get from their own mechanics.

Andy
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 1 Nov 2013
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: BC, sometimes
Posts: 578
Spot on there Andy. I tend to buy bikes used with a few thousand miles so the first owner eats the major depreciation, except for the wee which was new as there weren't any second hand ones around.

Turns out guy was taking his bike to dealer to have chain adjusted as it was free (presumably a chance for dealer to find something else to do and charge for that every month or so....). Wouldn't be worth my time or pride, personally.

Sherlock

Quote:
Originally Posted by Threewheelbonnie View Post
Chain adjustment is one of those constant battles between the mechano-fiddlers and the riders. Modern chains and the things that come on Enfields and need boiling up in whale tallow on a Primus stove every 37 yards are entirely different beasts. Likewise, an oiler on a chain that would live without one is somewhere between a comfort blanket to control the voices in the fiddlers head and a source of grinding paste that causes more wear and allows more fiddling. We all find our own balance on that one. Some even take their medicine in huge doses but less frequently with shaft drive.

The E&C debate has been done to death. Lots of interest, lots of second hand R1200GS's about, most of the new recruits clogged up a few "extreme-adventure" rallies for a few years and have now gone back to treating their GS just like they did the Sportsbike before. If they enjoy it, fair enough.

What I think caused the shock (if you can call it that) is that chain adjustment would typically be viewed alongside filling up with petrol and putting air in the tyres. You would have to wonder how anyone who couldn't do this themselves would get more than a few hundred miles from home. Choosing to let a dealer touch a bike is also alien to many here. No one cares more about your bike than you do. Dealers use air tools and no grease and leave things that then can't be undone at the roadside. They install "upgrades" to the fuelling without telling you and make the bike run rough at altitude. They either want to replace additional things they spot like worn brake pads there and then or don't tell you where as the owner would order some and see if they need fitting in a week or two. Above all, dealers cost more. We should maybe thank the people who will pay £50 to get their chain adjusted as they are keeping the mechanics employed until we need them. Unfortunately I suspect their lack of knowledge will lead the dealer to employ chain adjusters who'll be useless when we need a gearbox rebuilt.

Personally I'm currently embracing the throw away culture. Buy a new bike, ride the **** off it, do just enough serving at home to keep it alive until the MOT is due then trade it back to a dealer for another. If it makes it there on trade in day it's mission accomplished. My extra depreciation is less than I'd have paid in dealer service charges. When the ***s stamp up the service book and sell it on to someone who can't afford new it's the dealer doing the dirty on people and if they do believe a dealers salesman that's for them to sort. I'll hand it over with photographs and receipts for every oil and filter change, way better than you'd get from their own mechanics.

Andy
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 3 Nov 2013
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Oxfordshire, UK
Posts: 178
Chain? What's that? I had a look on my bike but couldn't find one. Am I missing something?
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 3 Nov 2013
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Oxford UK
Posts: 2,106
Not having problems keeping up in traffic are you, as it could have fallen off - maybe it was too slack. Might be an idea to give your dealer a call, they'll know what to do.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
KTM Dealership Or Good Mechanic In Medellin To Do A Valve Job Two Moto Kiwis SOUTH AMERICA 3 27 Aug 2013 18:20
Good Welder Needed in Kyrgyzstan or Kazakhstan GuiltyParty Northern and Central Asia 4 28 Jul 2013 02:12
Suggests for good camping at Keszthely, Hu, Dubrovnik and between Zadar and davebetty Route Planning 4 15 May 2012 07:02

 
 

Announcements

Thinking about traveling? Not sure about the whole thing? Watch the HU Achievable Dream Video Trailers and then get ALL the information you need to get inspired and learn how to travel anywhere in the world!

Have YOU ever wondered who has ridden around the world? We did too - and now here's the list of Circumnavigators!
Check it out now
, and add your information if we didn't find you.

Next HU Eventscalendar

HU Event and other updates on the HUBB Forum "Traveller's Advisories" thread.
ALL Dates subject to change.

2024:

2025:

  • Queensland is back! Date TBC - May?

Add yourself to the Updates List for each event!

Questions about an event? Ask here

HUBBUK: info

See all event details

 
World's most listened to Adventure Motorbike Show!
Check the RAW segments; Grant, your HU host is on every month!
Episodes below to listen to while you, err, pretend to do something or other...

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

2020 Edition of Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook.

"Ultimate global guide for red-blooded bikers planning overseas exploration. Covers choice & preparation of best bike, shipping overseas, baggage design, riding techniques, travel health, visas, documentation, safety and useful addresses." Recommended. (Grant)



Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance.

Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance™ combines into a single integrated program the best evacuation and rescue with the premier travel insurance coverages designed for adventurers.

Led by special operations veterans, Stanford Medicine affiliated physicians, paramedics and other travel experts, Ripcord is perfect for adventure seekers, climbers, skiers, sports enthusiasts, hunters, international travelers, humanitarian efforts, expeditions and more.

Ripcord travel protection is now available for ALL nationalities, and travel is covered on motorcycles of all sizes!


 

What others say about HU...

"This site is the BIBLE for international bike travelers." Greg, Australia

"Thank you! The web site, The travels, The insight, The inspiration, Everything, just thanks." Colin, UK

"My friend and I are planning a trip from Singapore to England... We found (the HU) site invaluable as an aid to planning and have based a lot of our purchases (bikes, riding gear, etc.) on what we have learned from this site." Phil, Australia

"I for one always had an adventurous spirit, but you and Susan lit the fire for my trip and I'll be forever grateful for what you two do to inspire others to just do it." Brent, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the (video) series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring!" Jennifer, Canada

"Your worldwide organisation and events are the Go To places to for all serious touring and aspiring touring bikers." Trevor, South Africa

"This is the answer to all my questions." Haydn, Australia

"Keep going the excellent work you are doing for Horizons Unlimited - I love it!" Thomas, Germany

Lots more comments here!



Five books by Graham Field!

Diaries of a compulsive traveller
by Graham Field
Book, eBook, Audiobook

"A compelling, honest, inspiring and entertaining writing style with a built-in feel-good factor" Get them NOW from the authors' website and Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, Amazon.co.uk.



Back Road Map Books and Backroad GPS Maps for all of Canada - a must have!

New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80G/S.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events all over the world with the help of volunteers; we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, or ask questions on the HUBB. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:11.