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  #1  
Old 9 Feb 2012
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G650gs

So what's the general view on the new(ish) G650GS?

Is that pretty much the same than the old funduro?

The engine is not Rotax anymore, it is chinese... shame as the rotax one was bullet proff... but it has a low standard seat of 78cm which is ideal for women and short riders... the only dual bike so low, all the other ones are at least 84cm or more!

Anyway, the bike has very good reviews in magazines, but as we all know, magazines are just nice marketing (no journalist is going to upset BMW now, right? ) ..

If you have one, could you tell me if it is good travel material? Or too fragile for dirt?

Cheers,
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  #2  
Old 9 Feb 2012
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Talking

Go back and get another Dakar Maria.
Despite all the marketing hype of the new bikes, the 'old' Dakar is still the best (IMHO)
Mine's a 2002 and I'd rather stick wasps up my 'gearbox' rather than get a new one!
There is wisdom in the devil you know!
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  #3  
Old 9 Feb 2012
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The Dakar is now the Sertao, a name that is derived from Brazil, funnily enough in view of where you are located Maria:-

2012 BMW G 650 GS Sertão

I have ridden a G650GS as a courtesy bike, so I came straight from a 2005 F650GS to ride the G model.
For those few hours of "ownership" it felt much the same as the F, unsurprisingly, but the grip of the knees is different because the "tank" (which is still an airbox/battery compartment) is a different shape.
Other wise, the instrument panel is neater, more modern in appearance and much like the other BMW bikes in production now.

I can't think of anything else to say about the G650GS because it is so similar to the F. Of course BMW brought this single cyl back into production to meet the public demand (BMW view in the press).
In the UK it is priced very competitively for its' market segment.
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  #4  
Old 10 Feb 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bertrand View Post
Go back and get another Dakar Maria.
Despite all the marketing hype of the new bikes, the 'old' Dakar is still the best (IMHO)
Mine's a 2002 and I'd rather stick wasps up my 'gearbox' rather than get a new one!
There is wisdom in the devil you know!

hmm I know.. the only problem with that is that ... there is no Dakar available in Rio. There is not much choice in term of travel bikes here unless you are a 6 feet something giant!

SO still wondering about the G650GS.
The Honday XRE300 is superb... but way to high for me... and as for lowering the bike, it would be trivial in the UK, but nothing is ever obvious or easy in Brazil
Especially if you do not speak well the language (NO ONE speak anything BUT portuguese!) or know where to go or who to contact!

Cheers,
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  #5  
Old 11 Feb 2012
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Personally I also reckon the twin spark (till 2007) Dakar was the best with a decent tank size, spoked wheels and most powerfull GS Rotax engine.

Don't think it matter where the engine is assembled, so long as it's done in a decent factory, although I'm not convinced that it's actually assembled in China at all. Seems to me it was only done for a small period. Now in Spandau according to this.

http://bmwmcmag.com/wp-content/uploa..._650_GS_EN.pdf

In the end the rotax designed motor, design license now sold to BMW, is as good as it always was. Haven't heard of massive problems, other than the waterpump, on any rotax engine made anywhere. Suspension failure across all 650GS models though, but any decent rider should change them to YZ anyway.
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  #6  
Old 11 Feb 2012
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Originally Posted by tmotten View Post
Suspension failure across all 650GS models though, but any decent rider should change them to YZ anyway.
or WPs.
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  #7  
Old 11 Feb 2012
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I was not so keen on the older F650GS single. I really liked the G650GS when I took one on a test ride last year, it seemed leaner, though an exhaust that didn't sound like a lawnmower would be my first improvement. My friend and I are renting G650GS bikes in Morocco at the end of the month so will probably report back.

BMW Bahnstormer director Paul Davis says he expects the Sertão to outsell the standard G650GS when it launches in March. Pricing (post #33) seems OK.
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  #8  
Old 11 Feb 2012
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Originally Posted by maria41 View Post
hmm I know.. the only problem with that is that ... there is no Dakar available in Rio. There is not much choice in term of travel bikes here unless you are a 6 feet something giant!

SO still wondering about the G650GS.
The Honday XRE300 is superb... but way to high for me... and as for lowering the bike, it would be trivial in the UK, but nothing is ever obvious or easy in Brazil
Especially if you do not speak well the language (NO ONE speak anything BUT portuguese!) or know where to go or who to contact!

Cheers,

maria, the XRE have 2 big problems. There's a lot of those bike with cylinder head problems (oil spitting, bad gaskets and all those things) and the other big problem with this bikes they are expensive and very prone to be stolen here in Brazil. If you are looking for a small displacement bikes take a loot at Yamaha's XTZ 250 line (Lander and Tenere).
.
Underneath all the plastic, the XRE 300 is nothing more than a Honda Tornado, but with 5 speed gearbox (instead of 6 on the Tornado) and Fuel Injection.

The 650's engine is assembled by Loncin in China but still using parts manufactured by Rotax in Europe. The BMW bike is considered as an expensive bike here (a lot of people prefer to buy an XT660 instead) but for almost the same money you would pay on the BMW you can buy a VStorm 650 (sometimes with ABS). Another option is to buy an pre-owned Honda NX400 Falcon is a very popular bike in South America (you can find replacement parts is the whole Latin America) but they don't sold them in Brazil anymore (the new brazilian emission standards kill it) but they still selling the bike in other south american countries.

I'm brazilian so if you need any help let me know.
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  #9  
Old 11 Feb 2012
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We also have the Kawasaki Versys here in Brazil, for smaller riders is probably the best option (IMHO obviously). I'm 6'2" and the bike seemed very small for me when I tried it a few months ago, maybe this could be the best option for you. The only bad thing about the Versys is the lack of the lack of Kawasaki dealerships around Brazil.
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  #10  
Old 12 Feb 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colebatch View Post
or WPs.
Agreed with colebatch!
I replaced the stock one by WP in my previous F650GS and had no problen at all during my trip.
I would certainly replace the stock shock again if I ever get the new G650GS as I cannot imagine the suspension would be better!
Now it will be interesting to smuggle a WP in my luggage when going back to Rio

Bruno, yes the XTZ 250 is a great bike. And I had a Versys in the UK, it is a tall bike for me. In the UK I got the seat scooped out and a gel seat inserted, and I also fitted a lowering link that I sourced from the US. It would be too difficult for me to get this sorted here. Also not great for dirt as the exhaust is under the belly. I absolutely loved that bike though!

The XT660 is great but like the XTZ is way too high for me. Above 80cm I would struggle, and I know" if you can get one toe down it is ok"! Well sort of, maybe on tarmac, but not with a fully loaded bike on a hard dirt road it is not! I learnt my lesson the very hard way and I like to reach the ground with my 2 feet!
Bruno do you know if it is possible in Brazil to find a lowering link for the XT660?
I intend to keep my next bike and tarvel with it so must be dual.

The V-strom is way too ugly! sorry, I can;t!

I would prefer at least a 400cc, mainly because the husband wants to get the F800, I can't just trail behing on a 250! There would be trouble in our couple at some point, so I want to be able to keep up.
I like the Falcon, shame they don't do it anymore. Maybe second hand. Again a bit tall but must be possible to lower it a bit!
If seat height was no issue, I would get the XT660! I hate being little!

Keep coming guys, especially if you know the Brazil models and you know how and where to lower a bike! Most useful info!

Thanks!

I am off to a churrasco now!
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  #11  
Old 12 Feb 2012
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2011 bmw g650-gs

Hi Maria 41, I did a write up on the 2011 G650-GS with photos here:

Which Bike :
From F800GS to DR 650 SE? Thread


Elisa and I bought two 2011 G650-GS in Spain and rode them from Spain to Turkey and back last year. Handling is great on or off road!

The 2011 BMW G650-GS engines were built in Berlin, Germany not China. The new 2012 Sertao has a 21 inch front wheel and a narrower back wheel then the 2011 G650-GS and a beefed up suspension which makes it more off roady.

Otherwise very little difference.

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  #12  
Old 13 Feb 2012
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Maria I was talking with some friends and they told me that is possible to fabricate a special Linkage to lower the rear suspension height on the bike just like this one.
OFF-THE-ROAD | Linkage bones, XT660Z | buy online
Using a special seat like the ones made by ERE Bancos also helps in lowering the seat position.

According to a friend he was able to lower the seat height on a XT660 to about 780mm (from the 865mm from the original XT660) using specially made linkages and a special seat, the same height as the original G650GS, 780 mm. To compare the XRE seat height is 860mm.

Last edited by bkm_br; 13 Feb 2012 at 03:06.
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  #13  
Old 2 Mar 2012
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I have the G650 country. Similar thing, almost identical engine but interestingly in 09 they switched to building it in China and made a few model changes, some good, some bad. I did a lot of homework on the bike and a lot of reseaerch into known faults and weaknesses and interestingly enough there was no less reliability with the newer version built in China. I've been out of touch a while so things might have changed now but it does tend to imply that the new one need not be any less reliable than the old one, no matter where it was built.
I've met a lot of people on the road who swear by these machines and not a single person who has used one hard has anything negative to say about them. I reckon the new one could be just as good. Fingers crossed.
As for shocks, I used a Wilburs, as recommended as an upgrade for my bike and it's been brilliant, best money I spent and it wasn't particularly expensive either. Worth a look.
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  #14  
Old 28 May 2012
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I just bought a 2012 Sertao G650GS it is a nice bike, easily maintains 75 mph on the Freeway, took it out in the dirt today did ok for a 450 pound bike. I bought it because I wanted Fuel injection, BMW reliability, GS tourtech add-ons. The bike will be doing the continental divide dirt ride next summer, 2700 miles of dirt roads, then either Alaska or South America. I shopped around for over a year deciding what to buy, this bike won. I have a KTM 520 EXC when I want to ride ruff stuff. I traded in my Harley Road King for the BMW. After I ride this a year, I will be able to tell you if it was a good deal or not. We will see, so far it does exactly what I wanted it to do.
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  #15  
Old 30 Jul 2012
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Been running a G650Gs since January this year.

Previous bikes in the BMW range have been an old black/white 650 Dakar...a 1150gsa...100gspd...and now the g650gs.

I think it is a cracking little bike.

The fuel mileage I have been getting has been very good, I think I managed 195 miles to 9.2 litres going up to Ripley this year. It is very agile and is great to flick around sharp corners and such, it is happy to cruise around motorway speeds as well.

It is a lot lighter and smaller than most bikes in the range obviously, which suits me fine as I have got over having to carry around a ton of gear all the time.

Comfy, fun, economical on fuel, cheap to service, cheap parts....lots of old f650 ( single ) parts fit it and when you drop it, you dont get a hernia picking it backup.
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