Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Technical, Bike forums > Which Bike?

Which Bike? Comments and Questions on what is the best bike for YOU, for YOUR trip. Note that we believe that ANY bike will do, so please remember that it's all down to PERSONAL OPINION. Technical Questions for all brands go in their own forum.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

AMERICA’S PREMIER MANUFACTURER OF MOTORCYCLE SUSPENSION

Like Tree15Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 6 Jun 2014
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 99
Perfect Adv Bike v Perfect Adv Attitude

Hi guys,

One of the followers of my blog suggested I post my most recent article entitled, "The Perfect Adventure Bike, or the Perfect Adventure Attitude" in this forum. Maybe up you'll enjoy it and perhaps it will offer another perspective when you're thinking about, "Which bike?" The link is below:

The Perfect Adventure Bike, or The Perfect Adventure Attitude? � HORCA MOTO

Cheers!

Paul
__________________
Blogging @ www.horcamoto.com
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 6 Jun 2014
brclarke's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Victoria, BC, CA
Posts: 503
Thumbs up

I posted this comment in that blog post, and I think I'd like to repeat it here. Your article reminded me of a story I read perhaps 20 years ago in a moto magazine – I think 'Rider', but I can’t recall for sure.

A moto journalist attended the Australian press showing of a new bike, some kind of 750 standard. The rider checked the bike out, fired it up and rode it out of Sydney. After riding it around on a variety of roads, he pulled over to a rest stop perhaps an hour or two north of Sydney. He hopped off the 750cc, stood back, and appraised the bike in his mind.

He had always wanted to tour all the way around Australia on an epic road trip, but for one reason or another had never done so. This was the bike, he thought to himself; finally I’ve found a motorcycle that is perfect for such a long and arduous trip of a few months on the road.

Just then, a small scooter, heavily laden with baggage, pulled into the rest stop beside him. The journalist was surprised, as he was miles from the nearest town, and this scooter looked too small to ride any serious distance on the highway. The rider jumped off and waved to him. She was a petite Japanese woman who spoke English half-decently.

When he talked with her, she told him she was riding around Australia on the little scooter – exactly the sort of trip he’d just been mulling over! He thought to himself that the bike was too small for the trip, but he wished her good luck on the long journey ahead of her.

“What do you mean?” she asked. “My trip is almost over – I’ve been riding for months and I’ve gone all the way around. I’ll be back in Sydney in an hour!”

I guess the moral of the story is that you can tour on any bike if you really want to make it happen.
__________________
Bruce Clarke --- 2011 Kawasaki Ninja 250R (black)
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 6 Jun 2014
chris's Avatar
Probably out riding
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: God's Own County
Posts: 2,250


A chap I met last year 150 km east of Yakutsk, Siberia, Far Eastern Russia: Phil Kirk from Australia on a 1983 Jawa 250 2 smoke. Riding from Magadan to London to attend a conference. His Australian employer was paying his transport to get there. Most use the money to buy an air ticket. He used it on freight from Brisbane to Magadan as well as petrol and 2 stroke oil!

Phil and the bike made it to London, with barely a hitch. Definitely worth considering alternative choices of vehicle when planning long distance travel. It doesn't need to be a real (or faux) "adventure" market niche junket with bling out of the catalogue. As said, attitude is good.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: West Yorkshire UK
Posts: 1,196
That's an MZ mate. Amongst Commie 2-smokers like myself there is a distinct hierarchy (when you are this far down the food chain it probably starts to matter!!). MZ were going to win the GP until Ernst Degner ran off to Suzuki to sort then out. They did win ISDT type stuff. Jawa/CZ (twin/split single 2-smoke) didn't do bad and of course did amazing things at speedway. Good engineering limited by poor materials. Planeta and Minsk etc. made these two look like breezing into town on a Brough when the locals were still pedalling!


Give me £200 for a new ignition unit and I'd set off on the MZ in the garage tomorrow.


Just saying! ;-)


Andy
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Brooklyn, NY, USA
Posts: 9
I used to think that there were 2 kinds of Adventure riders. Ones that spent weekends riding off road in the woods or deserts and those that took multi month, multi nation trips. Now, according to the article, one must travel off road for it to be an adventure.

I consider myself a bike rider who travels, I have backpack/Bused around the world and ridden around but the best of 2 worlds is travelling on a bike. I just don't go for the little off road bikes and I like to ride on road, preferably paved and curvy.

Most of the world has roads now, and you can get away from your comfort zone very easily without going off road.

I have had people laugh at the ADV sticker on my Victory when their GS has never been across a border.

I like adventure



Dirt and mud, not so much
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
chris's Avatar
Probably out riding
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: God's Own County
Posts: 2,250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threewheelbonnie View Post
That's an MZ mate. Amongst Commie 2-smokers like myself there is a distinct hierarchy (when you are this far down the food chain it probably starts to matter!!). MZ were going to win the GP until Ernst Degner ran off to Suzuki to sort then out. They did win ISDT type stuff. Jawa/CZ (twin/split single 2-smoke) didn't do bad and of course did amazing things at speedway. Good engineering limited by poor materials. Planeta and Minsk etc. made these two look like breezing into town on a Brough when the locals were still pedalling!


Give me £200 for a new ignition unit and I'd set off on the MZ in the garage tomorrow.


Just saying! ;-)


Andy
Andy
My sincerest and most humble apologies for not knowing the difference between a MZ (ar$e?) and a Jawa (elbow?) . I'm struggling to work out which out the the 2 is allegedly better.

Greetings to the neather regions of the food chain

cheers!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
mollydog's Avatar
Banned
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: california
Posts: 2,134
Attitude ...UPS and DOWNS!

From Paul's Blog:
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Forko View Post
But having said all that, I do have a view on what I think are the three most important characteristics for a moto, if you want to go beyond the asphalt. Firstly, you have to be able to ride your chosen mount comfortably off-road; that might be a KTM 990 or a XT225 Serow, depending on the rider. Secondly, you must be able to pick up your bike, loaded, alone; if you can’t, you’ll fear dropping it which in turn will stop you from exploring those magical, lonely routes which (for me) define these trips. And thirdly, it needs to be reliable. I’ve ridden some dirt roads through the mountains and not encountered another person for 300km; doubting my machine’s reliability would have denied me such a stunning ride.
Good and valid points all!

But ultimately it gets back to your earlier point:
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Forko View Post
Let me start by asking you a question of those of you planning a long ride through South America, Siberia or elsewhere. Are you going on a bike trip, or are you going to travel on a bike? The difference in phraseology is subtle, but the difference in philosophy is big. If the soul of the trip is built around the bike, then which bike you ride will have much more impact on the experience. If, however, the moto is simply your mode of transport, choosing your machine is less of an issue. So when you decide to ride, get clear on what you are aspiring to do – you might save yourself a lot of unnecessary agonising over which machine you need to buy. I’ve met people who sit at both extremes of this spectrum; some who only want to ride, ride, ride and others who are happy on a local Chinese 200. However most of us, I suspect, sit somewhere between the two.
To me, the above is KEY. Is your trip about "THE BIKE"? or is it about "The Trip ... that you happen to be doing on a bike"? In years past we've seen riders set out on fully loaded, fully equipped BIG BIKES ... with a budget to match. Many still travel this way. But as Paul has pointed out ... lots of alternate approaches.

More and more we see younger (poorer) riders (and some older ones too) buying a small bike locally and setting out, improvising all the way. The world is big enough for both travel styles. Which is better depends on the rider and his point of view on travel.
Having a positive attitude makes all the difference.

Another good point was the bit about "What is an Adventure Bike" and "What is Adventure Travel". It's all up for interpretation innit? ... ADV Rider.com must have a hundred threads that have discussed this in great depth with hundreds of differing opinions. Too many really. The only one that really matters is your own. But ...DO put it to the test and get out there and DO IT!

Maintaining a good attitude is not always easy on the road. Group travel has iUPS and it's DOWNS too. The group dynamic separates you from locals and limits interaction but gives you support and camaraderie. Some prefer just hanging with mates vs. locals, who they can't communicate with anyway.

But dealing with the group dynamic can itself be challenging and exhausting ... unless you have a Fascist leader in charge so there is NO discussion or alternatives. (been there, done that!)

But even solo riders who speak the language get the travel blues. They tire of the road and their "attitude" can suffer. Riding alone too long can also make you crazy ... when you have long, extended conversations with yourself ... you may be getting there! (yes, this is autobiographical ) Also, see Nathan Millward. (Postie bike guy)
Being alone too much can breed anti-social, xenophobic behaviors.

Maintaining "Group happiness" is a huge challenge. Even with just one riding companion, not always perfect or easy.

What I figured out was that life on the road living off a motorcycle is not ideal for ALL humans all the time. Some, on the other hand, take to it perfectly and can literally live on the road .... Forever ...happy as clams.

Having UPS and DOWNS is normal. Try to maintain the UPS as much as possible. Follow a travel routine that maintains a good attitude, this can make for a happy trip for you and those around you.

Last edited by mollydog; 4 Weeks Ago at 03:37.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Oxford UK
Posts: 971
That's the second link to the Horca site I've seen in the last 24hrs - not surprising as it seems to be well written with a lot of relevent stuff.

When it comes to the "bike traveller vs travelling biker" arguement I think it's more subtle than which side of the see-saw you're sitting on. Over the years I've travelled a lot by bike and a fair bit by car, van, public transport and on foot. Bike travel (for me anyway) isn't just one option among many, something I'll do when the budget is too tight to take the car or it's too far to walk, it's something that goes to the heart of my personality. I'm interested in the mechanisms of bike travel as well as the mechanics of the bike. I actively enjoy the interplay between riding the bike and the activity of travelling - even when I'm soaking wet or freezing cold, in a way that I get to a lesser degree when I'm in a car for example. The two come together to form something that's more than the sum of the individual parts. If you think that's a load of pretentious bollocks then might I suggest you might be more suited to a rucksack and the bus stop down the road.

It's because of that I'm not that bothered by the "adventure bike" industry that's sprung up over the last couple of decades. Yes I appreciate the wider range of bikes and bolt on bits that the upsurge has made available but for me the choice of bike has always come down to something that interests me, not something that ticks the perceived travel wisdom boxes. Money (within reason) has very little to do with this.

The eclectic collection of wrecks that have made up my biking history have come from somewhere else other than a desire to find the perfect travel / adventure bike. They've all been adventure bikes but the adventure has been inside my head. I want to ride a bike that interests me to on a journey that interests me and if the thing blows up a mile down the road, well, so be it. It even, at one point, included an MZ250 (and it might well again in the future) but never, ever a CZ. Even I have limits.

Re good attitude and "the blues", I've been there, suffered that, and right at this moment I'm acting as support back up to my daughter who's a couple of weeks into her first long (three months) solo trip. I can see the signs of hyperactive nervousness developing in her as I've been there myself in the past.

Years ago I was involved in a series of minibus trips, all of which had problems of one sort or another and it was interesting (afterwards anyway) to see that some people were devastated when were (inevitably) periodically stuck at the side of the road, they just went to pieces. Others just took it in their stride. People's core personalities come to the fore at times like that and you soon learn whether you want to travel with them again.
I have an intense dislike of the "my way or else" travel companion and will no longer go anywhere with someone who insists they're in charge (other than my dear wife of course!) even if they're otherwise perfectly pleasant. It's not because I want the dominant role myself but because I much prefer it to be a voyage of equals. Not some communist collective on the road but taking others preferences and wishes into account is important to maintaining "group happiness". Finding that some sort of factionalisation develops and it ends in a mutiny (been on a trip where that happened) doesn't make for a good atmosphere.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
chris's Avatar
Probably out riding
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: God's Own County
Posts: 2,250
Quote:
Originally Posted by mollydog View Post
Also, see Simon Millward. (Postie bike guy)
Nathan, not Simon. Simon was tragically killed in Mali in 2003.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
mollydog's Avatar
Banned
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: california
Posts: 2,134
Quote:
Originally Posted by backofbeyond View Post
I'm interested in the mechanisms of bike travel as well as the mechanics of the bike. I actively enjoy the interplay between riding the bike and the activity of travelling - even when I'm soaking wet or freezing cold, in a way that I get to a lesser degree when I'm in a car for example. The two come together to form something that's more than the sum of the individual parts. If you think that's a load of pretentious bollocks then might I suggest you might be more suited to a rucksack and the bus stop down the road.
Excellent point! above and good post! I'm a motorcyclist at heart, have always done most of my own maintenance ... I too like the mechanical interplay. But my point (sort of, in a not very well presented way) was more about newer, younger and inexperienced riders coming from varied backgrounds ... most who never rode bikes before. Plenty of these guys and gals out there NOW as "adventure biking" really spreads out.

Far as bikes goes, I do prefer something more basic and simple over complexity. Reliability is important ... but this must be proven to me empirically, not from experience of others. I did lots of non motorcycle travel too .... and like you, enjoy traveling on a bike BEST! I work hard to keep my bike in good running order, after all, on a bike you could say your life depends on it!

Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
mollydog's Avatar
Banned
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: california
Posts: 2,134
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris View Post
Nathan, not Simon. Simon was tragically killed in Mali in 2003.
I've read about Simon, but I own Nate's book ... so should have known better as it's sat here in front of me.


Nate's famous Postie bike
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 2 Weeks Ago
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Europe currently
Posts: 198
"For me, ‘Light is Might’. And the lighter, the better."

I agree with him 100% on this.

"Until Yamaha give us a WR450R, I’m eyeing up the new CCM GP450. If the engine proves to be reliable, then for me we might be getting closer to the mythical perfect adventure bike."

The first company to make a 450 enduro with about 45 hp and a 7,500 km service interval (comparable to the 690) with good suspension is going to have my money.

I don't care if it has a fairing, I'd rather build my own. I don't care if its a Honda CRF, Yamaha WR, KTM. Just give me a reliable 450 thumper enduro with good suspension. The gap between DRZ 400 and KTM 690 is HUGE. Close to 40 hp. Why why why why hasn't any company filled this gap? For adventurers and weekend enduro riders alike, it would truly be an amazing bike. And please, try to keep it under 130 kilo
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 2 Weeks Ago
Snakeboy's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Oslo - Norway
Posts: 114
I met a australian guy in Laos last winter on a Royal Enfield. I didnt ask his age but he must have been around 55-60. He had a huge beard, a huge belly and a huge smile. He was absoulutely a happy go lucky type of person. He had shipped his bike from Darwin to Indonesia some place and had been riding through Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Cambodia and were then in Laos. He wore a leather coat - not designed for motorbiking at all, some pair of working gloves (not motorbike gloves) and half face helmet and a pair of jeans. And just a pair of light boots. On the back on his Royal Enfield he had a cheap looking duffel bag medium size strapped to the bike. That was all he brought for a 5-6 mounds tour around southeastasia. He hang up with my group of bikers for 3-4 days and he was truly and honestly the coolest bike I ever have met.

And the best item he had was a T-shirt with a huge print on the chest who said this:

"ADVENTURE BEFORE DEMENTIA"

Now this ozzi guy definetively had the right attitude. The best attitude I ever saw at least.....
__________________
In the end everything will be fine. If its not fine its not the end....
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 2 Weeks Ago
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
Posts: 70
Very interesting discussion and makes you classify yourself, and decide in which box of riding you belong. It also gives you perspective on others as well, which clears up the different perspectives on the bikes people choose.

The travel thing has wore off so these days it is more about the bike, so now my trips look like endurance runs of 450+ km per day. It is about the ride, not so much the destination. For this reason, the bigger bikes are more my preference. I do my weekend and day trips on gravel as well, totally about the road. 3000 km for me is a 1 week trip. I don't like groups. I have no interest in group dynamics, the social aspects etc, and it is about riding most of the day, eat, sleep, reset. Alone is best. With another rider, 2 to 3 days is enough. Smokers want to stop every 30 minutes, and those with small bladders every hour. Some get tired of gravel. Some only want gravel. Sometimes I'm happy to ride tar, other times gravel. Sand I don't like. Why compromise my ride just to ride with others?


I despise places where plenty of bikes gather, including breakfast run venues, tourist locations and check list 'must do' rides. Some of the rides I hated the most are what others say is great riding. Look on internet for great rides, and to me they are awful. To me it is just regularly seeing other bikes, clouds of dust, and the usual BS conversations with group riders. I prefer to get away from that.

Naturally once you can put classify your riding style, you can choose your bike. Perhaps it is about the trip and destinations, and the bike is only a form of transport. Then if it is just a form of transport small and cheap is better. I want a bike that puts a grin on my face. Like something in orange I don't mind spending money on the bike. Money isn't a limiting factor for me. It just must be a ride I enjoy, preferably to a place without other bikes. For me, I like bikes and riding. I don't necessarily like the bike scene and don't associate with it. If I did I guess I would have a different view of the starbucks/group ride/breakfast run/MC scene.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 2 Weeks Ago
mollydog's Avatar
Banned
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: california
Posts: 2,134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snakeboy View Post
"ADVENTURE BEFORE DEMENTIA"

Now this ozzi guy definetively had the right attitude. The best attitude I ever saw at least.....
Great story! Love it! Being happy out on the road is not always easy! Some of us bring our nightmares along in our panniers!
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
XR650RTW - Around the World on an XR650R - Bike Build jnk_ Which Bike? 4 28 Jun 2013 20:00
Steps to Buying a Used Bike in Santiago Chile lachy South America 64 24 Nov 2012 01:57
Looking for some help in getting started TotalTomination South America 20 30 Oct 2009 17:02
Few tips for selling your bike in Buenos Aires eyalchuck TRAVEL Bikes for Sale / Wanted 3 9 Jun 2009 19:05
Transfering Title In Buenos Aires kwelfl South America 7 28 Dec 2008 15:06

 
 



Renedian Adventures

HU DVD Summer Special!

Now that summer is here, get On the Road! Take 30% off the Achievable Dream - On the Road! 2-DVD set until August 31 only. Get On the Road! Learn the tips to staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure!

Our veteran travellers share their tips (and great stories) for staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure.

"A fantastic, informative and inspirational DVD."

"It's brilliant - thank you very much!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'ONTHEROAD' on your order when you checkout.

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 00:05.