Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Technical, Bike forums > Yamaha Tech

Yamaha Tech Originally the Yamaha XT600 Tech Forum, due to demand it now includes all Yamaha's technical / mechanical / repair / preparation questions.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Calendar Contest Voting is now CLOSED. Results to be posted shortly.


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 6 Aug 2012
BlackDogZulu's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: West Wales, UK
Posts: 759
Restoring an XT

When I get the Sprint sold and a suitable 'daily rider'/tourer purchased, I intend to take the XT off the road for a few months. It's getting very tired, and a lot of things are needing attention - new tyres, chain & sprox, clutch, brakes, wiring - and the frame is getting rather rusty. I want to bring it back to good, useable, reliable condition. I'm tempted to try a full restoration back to factory, just for a laugh, but I think that could be too much expense and bother. I have never ever seen another green/lilac one, so I imagine getting body parts would be a nightmare.

Anyway, I have a few questions buzzing around in my head, and I would love to have input from anyone who has experience of this stuff (or a view on it). I am reasonably OK mechanically (do all my own maintenance) but I have no experience at all of restoration work. Here's a couple of queries, and there will be more ...

1. I intend to powdercoat the frame, swingarm, fork sliders and hubs. I'd also like to powdercoat the engine, but I would be worried how the coating would take the heat. I've heard of it being done, but not how it turned out. OK to coat the cases, perhaps, but not the cylinder and head? I'm confident I could get a reasonable result with rattle cans doing it myself, but that wouldn't be as durable as powdercoating, right?

2. Shot/gritblasting, bead, vapour, or one of these new things that uses crushed walnut shells and the like? Is it worth getting a small home grit machine, or is it just a heartbreak waiting to happen? I did some bead blasting many years ago using borrowed equipment and I got on fine with it, but that was pro kit, not the sort of backyard DIY kit that I could afford today.

3. Tank scoops are missing, and the other plastics are pretty scratched and scabby. Are these still available from Yamaha dealers? I haven't seen much on eBay, and for the age of the bike (1994) it's unlikely that any secondhand parts will be sound enough to use. Failing that, what's the success rate for sanding, filling and repainting the originals? Any pointers on products to use (i.e. paint and primer that will be OK with flexible plastics)?

4. Wiring. The existing loom is more bodge than original (the PO seemed to do everything with scissors and gaffer tape). I've searched for an OEM loom on the web, and the price was frightening, but for reliability I reckon a new loom is essential. I could make it myself from bought-in components, but I want it to be better (i.e. more reliable) than the crimped terminals I usually use. I can follow a wiring diagram, and I have seen that Vehicle Wiring Products sell a 'pro' kit for making terminals - any views on this? I'd quite like to redesign the electrics so that not everything depended on one 20A fuse, but that would need a bit of thought. Faulty electrics are the only problems I have had with the bike, and I would like to get it right for the long term.

Bike is a 3TB from 1994, UK spec. Did anyone else see the 'overlander' XT600 built by David Lambert in TBM a couple of years ago? I'd like to aim for something like that, really.

Feel free to poke fun at the idea, make suggestions, scoff, advise, whatever. Anything to help me crystallise my thoughts. Basically, the bike is at the point where anyone rational would class it as not worth spending money on. But in terms of that 'connection' you have with a bike, it's one that I want to make good again and ride for the next 20 years. I will never sell it, but letting it continue to deteriorate would be criminal. I don't have much spare cash, but I reckon if I spread it out over a time it will be doable.

Sorry for the long post. Over to you guys.
__________________
2006 XT660R daily ride, 1994 XT600E about to be reborn, Blog: http://goingfastgettingnowhere.blogspot.com/
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 6 Aug 2012
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Manchester
Posts: 148
Would be interesting keeping the thread going with photos, updates and problems you come across as you go along.
__________________
Yamaha TT600RE 2004
Yamaha YZ250 2 stroke 99
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 6 Aug 2012
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: South Africa,Gauteng
Posts: 27
I love the idea that you are attempting a rebuild. I am starting a rebuild of my old '84 XT and if done well I think it could still last me many years. I rode my brother's Suzuki Boulevard yesterday and that bike was loud, and to be honest quite uncomfortable. When I got back on the XT, I just realised how much the bike is actually worth to me personally and how much fun it is to ride.

Please post pics of the wiring process. It will come in handy for me soon (although my bike's wiring will probably be much simpler than yours as it is still kick start).

Going to completely sandblast and re-powder coat the frame, rebuilding and repainting the engine, repainting the tank and side covers, getting new decals etc, etc, etc. Such a good project to work on, and not too expensive, but still dependent on cash flow....
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 6 Aug 2012
bacardi23's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: XXX<-Portugal->Azores->Santa Maria (island)
Posts: 1,515
Before you even attempt to start on the wiring get a proper wiring diagram that matches your bike!

I've used Vehicle Wiring Products Ltd. Suppliers of auto electrical parts. to get the parts I needed to finish upgrading my wiring loom.

You can even get cable with matching colours to your wiring loom!
As for the crimping kit, get one with the proper crimping tool "Ref PR4". (I bought a cheaper one off ebay but had to wait about a month to get it)..

If you really want new fairings and air scoops you can always get them from Brazil: www.resinarte.com.br SobreThey used to do the replicas for the 1990-1994 models, just ask them..



Powder coating the Frame,forks (not the chrome part) wheels and hubs I'd do it if I could!

As for powdercoating the engine I don't really think you should do it...
I used a rattle can to paint the cylinder on mine after really cleaning everything bit of oxidation, grease, everything up and it is perfect for two years now.
The rest of the engine however, I had it professionally painted with high temp aluminum paint and it looks just horrible.. I'll have to paint it when I have enough patience!


You should change your wheel bearings, swingarm bearings and fork bearings as you're at it!



Good Luck!
Vando
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 6 Aug 2012
bacardi23's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: XXX<-Portugal->Azores->Santa Maria (island)
Posts: 1,515
Same products from Resinarte: MARIANOSMOTOPARTS Sobre
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 6 Aug 2012
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Scotland
Posts: 37
XT restoration

Have a look at this site, some good rebuild and restoration threads.

The Ténéré Forum &bull; Index page

Last edited by IanW; 6 Aug 2012 at 20:06. Reason: spelling
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 7 Aug 2012
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Border Ranges Northern NSW, Australia
Posts: 721
Rattle cans are fine for the engine, we all use them.

Get your metallic parts plated as well & vapor blasting is the best way.

Like Ian said have a read through the Restoration section & see how the guys are doing them, some very nice work being churned out.

Mezo.
__________________
http://www.tenere.co.uk/
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 7 Aug 2012
BlackDogZulu's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: West Wales, UK
Posts: 759
Quote:
Originally Posted by Panzer View Post
Would be interesting keeping the thread going with photos, updates and problems you come across as you go along.
Yes, I intend to do this. Don't hold your breath, though - I probably won't start until the winter. I need to sell/replace the Sprint first, and that's not going well

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quicken View Post
I love the idea that you are attempting a rebuild. I am starting a rebuild of my old '84 XT and if done well I think it could still last me many years.
Confession time - I love the bike. Economically, I should just sell it for what I can get and put the money into a better bike, but that ain't going to happen. We've had too many adventures together, nothing dramatic, but every mile has been fun. I feel it deserves some TLC, if that doesn't sound pathetically girly. If I make any mods to the wiring, I will post about it for sure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bacardi23 View Post
Before you even attempt to start on the wiring get a proper wiring diagram that matches your bike!
I have several, although nothing that matches the exact model. But between them I can make sense of most of it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bacardi23 View Post
I've used Vehicle Wiring Products Ltd. Suppliers of auto electrical parts. to get the parts I needed to finish upgrading my wiring loom.
I've used them before, too - very handy source.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bacardi23 View Post
You can even get cable with matching colours to your wiring loom!
Keeping the wire colours as close to factory as possible makes a lot of sense.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bacardi23 View Post
As for the crimping kit, get one with the proper crimping tool "Ref PR4". (I bought a cheaper one off ebay but had to wait about a month to get it)..
Good info, thanks again. I think that's the kit I was talking about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bacardi23 View Post
If you really want new fairings and air scoops you can always get them from Brazil: www.resinarte.com.br SobreThey used to do the replicas for the 1990-1994 models, just ask them..
Brilliant. Thanks again, again.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bacardi23 View Post
Powder coating the Frame,forks (not the chrome part) wheels and hubs I'd do it if I could!

As for powdercoating the engine I don't really think you should do it...
I used a rattle can to paint the cylinder on mine after really cleaning everything bit of oxidation, grease, everything up and it is perfect for two years now.
Yeah, thought that might be the case ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by bacardi23 View Post
You should change your wheel bearings, swingarm bearings and fork bearings as you're at it!
Yes, planned to do that. All consumables, bearings, cables - it would be pointless not to replace all these when the bike is apart.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bacardi23 View Post
Good Luck!
Vando
Cheers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by IanW View Post
Have a look at this site, some good rebuild and restoration threads.

The Ténéré Forum &bull; Index page
Thanks for that - will have a look later.

Thanks to everyone for some great responses. I'll let you know how I get along.

Anybody wanna buy a sports tourer? British? Low mileage?

Hello?
__________________
2006 XT660R daily ride, 1994 XT600E about to be reborn, Blog: http://goingfastgettingnowhere.blogspot.com/
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 7 Aug 2012
Pboko2388's Avatar
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 35
as for the powder coating DONT DO IT!!!!! find some one who does good electrostatic painting it will allow the paint to flex and stay with the movement of the metal due to temp changes....as far as the plastics id say patch up any damage with fiberglass then paint. the paint will bond better to the fiberglass too, with getting new plastics they are available from online dealers, but ive found it alot more affordable to look right here on THE HUBB parts are usually used but ive got some really quality stuff on here ... electrics have always been a hobby of mine. if it were me id make a new harness. all waterproof connectorswith a fair size gauged flexible wire. no problem with the sytem running of a 20A fuse, if anything you could just add in-line fuses in areas of concern... i love the idea of trying to get it back to stock , i have a 92 3TB that i would like to make mostly stock, but havent had the time or the money to put into her... good luck on the build

p.s. nothing girly about loving your bike dude, mines a pile, but i love her all the same. good times and alotta sentimental reasons im holding on to mine, deffinately not worth the time or money economically but its like a classic. they dont start out widely loved but when there scarce people will do alot to get there hands on one...
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 8 Aug 2012
BlackDogZulu's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: West Wales, UK
Posts: 759
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mezo View Post
Rattle cans are fine for the engine, we all use them.

Get your metallic parts plated as well & vapor blasting is the best way.

Like Ian said have a read through the Restoration section & see how the guys are doing them, some very nice work being churned out.

Mezo.
Rattle cans good - I can do them!

I noticed that David Lambert (it was TBM February 2001, by the way) had all the metal parts nickel-plated. I thought it looked great and the resistance to corrosion should be excellent.

Just off to have a look at that forum now. Thanks.
__________________
2006 XT660R daily ride, 1994 XT600E about to be reborn, Blog: http://goingfastgettingnowhere.blogspot.com/
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 8 Aug 2012
BlackDogZulu's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: West Wales, UK
Posts: 759
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pboko2388 View Post
as for the powder coating DONT DO IT!!!!! find some one who does good electrostatic painting it will allow the paint to flex and stay with the movement of the metal due to temp changes....as far as the plastics id say patch up any damage with fiberglass then paint. the paint will bond better to the fiberglass too, with getting new plastics they are available from online dealers, but ive found it alot more affordable to look right here on THE HUBB parts are usually used but ive got some really quality stuff on here
I've heard both good and bad about powdercoating - durable but hard to touch up if it gets chipped. If I can get the frame, swingarm etc properly cleaned (i.e. blasted in some way) then I may well have go at painting them myself. I've done a lot with rattlecans in the past with reasonable success, but I might have a go at brush painting. I have access to advice (but not actual help) from a guy who used to be a coachpainter for a living, and he's pretty confident that it's possible to get a superb result with brushing. Time isn't going to be an issue, so that might be a way forward.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pboko2388 View Post
... electrics have always been a hobby of mine. if it were me id make a new harness. all waterproof connectorswith a fair size gauged flexible wire. no problem with the sytem running of a 20A fuse, if anything you could just add in-line fuses in areas of concern...
If I make a new harness (which I probably will) it will be good-quality, heavy gauge stuff, made as waterproof as I can get it. As I said above, the only reliability issues I have had with the bike have been electrical, and a new loom would sort it for good. The reason I don't like the single fuse system is that everything depends on the one fuse. A couple of winters ago, a single chafing wire running to the headlight stopped the bike dead. If it had happened half a mile further on, it would have left me in a very dangerous place with no lights or engine. If I could, I would like to redesign the harness so that engine and lights were separately fused. I like a degree of built-in redundancy. The odd few grams of weight aren't an issue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pboko2388 View Post
i love the idea of trying to get it back to stock , i have a 92 3TB that i would like to make mostly stock, but havent had the time or the money to put into her... good luck on the build
Part of me really wants to return it to better than factory, proper paint, decals, plastics and everything. That would give me a lot of pleasure, but I reckon the cost would be prohibitive. A 'special' that suited my needs exactly, with paint and fittings of my choice, would be less original but a better proposition in terms of money spent.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pboko2388 View Post
p.s. nothing girly about loving your bike dude, mines a pile, but i love her all the same. good times and alotta sentimental reasons im holding on to mine, deffinately not worth the time or money economically but its like a classic. they dont start out widely loved but when there scarce people will do alot to get there hands on one...
Thanks for the reassurance! I am fonder of this bike (fond is a better word for me than love, I think) than any other. There's a lot of me in it, knuckle skin included, and we aren't parting, ever.

Even in its present, rather scabby, condition, I have had people approach me and congratulate me for keeping such a machine in good condition and daily use. They probably needed glasses to describe it as 'good', but I took their point. Most bikes, and especially trailbikes, are in the scrapyard at 18 years old, but my little XT keeps getting me to work every day, and making me smile every time I swing a leg over it. It's an Armageddon bike - after the nuclear holocaust, all that will be left will be cockroaches and a few well-loved XT Yamahas.

Here's the 'before' picture, which makes it look better than it is:

__________________
2006 XT660R daily ride, 1994 XT600E about to be reborn, Blog: http://goingfastgettingnowhere.blogspot.com/
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


 
 



HU DVD Spring Special!

Buy the Achievable Dream Collectors Set and get Road Heroes Part 1 FREE!

Achievable Dream - The Whole Enchilada!

Cooped up indoors in crap weather? Binge watch over 20 hours of inspiring, informative and entertaining stories and tips from 150 travellers! Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to order them both and use Coupon Code 'BoxSet+' on your order when you checkout.


What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders


contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!




New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.



Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!






All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:17.