Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Technical, Bike forums > Which Bike?

Which Bike? Comments and Questions on what is the best bike for YOU, for YOUR trip. Note that we believe that ANY bike will do, so please remember that it's all down to PERSONAL OPINION. Technical Questions for all brands go in their own forum.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

AMERICA’S PREMIER MANUFACTURER OF MOTORCYCLE SUSPENSION

Like Tree1Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16  
Old 6 Jul 2006
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
Posts: 50
C90 prep

Quote:
Originally Posted by password
I would be very interested to get a bit more detail about the prep work done to the bikes and what you consider to be the most important aspects of touring in this manner. I would be especially interested in the expansion of the fuel tank to give increased range, unfortunately I cannot sent a private message as I do not have the required amount of posts (only been using this site for a couple of days!) when I do I will message you.
The most important aspect of long distance travelling on a C90 is definetly: take it easy! Enjoy the ride and don´t worry about going slow. You´ll find it a very refreshing experience to really become part of your surroundings, not just ride through them.

We went all out on the prep of our bikes: imported like new 1992 C50´s from Japan (the 'in between' model), imported brand spanking new engines from Thailand (Honda Wave 97cc), sandblasted and powdercoated all metal parts, imported and licensed the bikes in the Netherlands, fitted loud ass exhausts and hey presto! I admit, this was kind of over the top preparation as you couldn´t beat a C90 to death with a stick anyway, but it was a great bike-rider bonding experience.

The most important thing to look for is a bike with a solid frame. Especially the rear part rots faster than you can say 'Sake', so get a solid one. Finding an ´old style´ 90 (or 50 or 70, they are almost all the same) with a solid frame can be a challenge. If looks are not important to you, you could go for a second generation Cub from the late `80s, early ´90s, the so called 'square headlight model'. Quite a few good ones around. You could also go for a new bike and buy a Honda Biz. Check out www.cub90.co.uk for an excellent BB and more info on new bikes.

Some pointers when looking for a Cub:
12 volt is better than 6 volt. Electronic ignition is better than points. A C90 with electronic ignition is virtually indestructible. NEVER buy the C90 with the big engine with the points on the cilinder head. This was the only C90 of which the engine is not compatible with any other Cub model. The sump is different, so it only fits a specific type of C90 and is NOT interchangeable with all the other types. I believe the CT uses engine with the points on the head, making it a lot less easy to find and interchange parts for this engine than for a regular C90. I am not 100% sure about this however, so I will check this for you. Oh yeah, the single seat that our Japanese bikes came with is awesome, very comfortable for me and I am 1,95 m.

About the fuel: check the pictures on the website and you will see two white plastic Acerbis 5 liter fuel tanks mounted on either side of the rear of the bikes. We used a motorboat primer and, a fuel filter and two 75cm ends of fuel line to pump fuel from the Acerbis tanks into the main tank underneath the seat. Takes about 2 minutes to fill the tank that way and provides a welcome break after hours of happy scootering (120 mpg, 1 gallon of fuel, 50 mph...you do the math!).

You can mail me on dirk -insert@here- honda50.cc for more info.

We did use stronger rear shocks and the front suspension (swing arm) sucks. But no matter what you do to it it doesn´t break, so it is just a matter of getting used to I guess. I have seen Cubs with Innova front forks with disc brakes (the Honda Biz setup), but it just seems like less fun to me. Takes away a lot of the charm of the bike.

Cuppa500: thnx for the free plug of the site.

Jade: Got a website? Would love to follow your trip.

Cheers,
Dirk
__________________
Everytime people see me it´s a KODAK moment!

Last edited by Dirk Taalman; 7 Jul 2006 at 00:16.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 7 Jul 2006
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lincolnshire UK
Posts: 50
Once again guys thanks for the posts, Cheers Dirk, all very useful advice. I think the square headlamp model is the one to go for, it’s not as pretty but looks are not important, I will take reliable and ugly any day (my ex-girlfriend would say something like that!)

Defiantly need to extend the fuel capacity, I will check out the Acerbis site to see what options are available.. I notice that neither of you used a screen why was this, do they effect front end stability. You also mentioned that you shipped your bike for 300 USD can I have the name or details of the firm that provided this service.

Thanks Jade for your post, that’s some trip, shame we are starting out from opposite sides of the planet!, you will love the TT though , I will send you a PM if that’s OK and we can chat, it may be possible to meet up, who knows, my plans are still very sketchy at the moment.

Thanks again to the people who have contributed to this thread. The more the merrier!



Greg
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 7 Jul 2006
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
Posts: 50
C90zz

Greg,

The C90 with the 'regular' engine is called the C90zz. Parts of the zz are interchangeable with ANY other Cub, 50, 70 or 90 (including the square headlight one). And with a whole bunch of Wave´s, Dreams and generic brand C90 ripoffs.

We mounted the Acerbis tanks on a stainles steel frame. This worked wel, but was a bit heavy. For my next trip I will use the same setup, but with a lighter frame. Maybe aluminium.

One last tip, but please don´t spread the word on this one, I am trying to keep this one for myself : the Yamaha Townmate T80. Basically a C90 with shaft drive! Talk about indestructible!

Happy trails,
Dirk
__________________
Everytime people see me it´s a KODAK moment!
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 12 Jul 2006
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: melbourne, VIC, Australia
Posts: 20
sorry didn't PM (havn't got my numbers up yet), give me 5mins. u could always fly over here to OZ! LOL if with be nice and warm!!! Summer!!!! they do cheap 99 pound one way flights from heathrow around xmas time (standby).
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 12 Jul 2006
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: melbourne, VIC, Australia
Posts: 20
sorry dirk, don't have a website yet. gotta work out how to make one. just learnt how to put some pics on the net.

me and some mates on a overnite ride last saturday. 10pm till 9am! had an absolute ball. 150+ bikes. we got lost sooo many times. but found some awesome roads in the process. oh, it was in victoria, Australia, organised by the BMW club, an annual event called the icicle ride. i have a yamaha R6 '03 at the mo which i absolutely love(only for another 2 weeks, as it almost sold). then i can buy my postie

Last edited by JADE; 16 Jul 2006 at 04:43.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 12 Jul 2006
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 31
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by JADE
when are u planning on taking off? sounds like i'm doing the same sort of trip as u. but i have decided on the postie bike (CT 110). started off as a joke one day with my mum and now i'm going through with it. i'm leaving OZ in jan 07 riding to london (IOM for the TT races end of may) through southeast asia, india, eastern europe etc. then if that goes well, who knows. its Me vs The World! probably head down through africa. would love some company if ur up 4 it!
Jade

Please keep us posted on your preparations and trip. I have heard OF people doing the trip by postie bike but not FROM someone doing the trip. It appeals to my warped sense of humour.

John
__________________
BTO APAW
One day I'm gunna......
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 12 Jul 2006
brclarke's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Victoria, BC, CA
Posts: 503
Talking Or fly to Mexico and buy one new!

You may be interested to learn that the C90 Cub is still sold NEW in Mexico...
http://www.honda.com.mx/honda2006/
Look at the section on "Motonetas Urbanas"
The price for a new one is about 20,000 MX$, or about $2000 US.

You can buy one of the more 'modern' C100 Waves for only 15,000 MX$; they're cheaper because they're made in China, where the labour costs are lower.
__________________
Bruce Clarke --- 2011 Kawasaki Ninja 250R (black)
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 14 Jul 2006
yuma simon's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Yuma, Arizona, USA
Posts: 456
I know that Honda stopped making the Trailbike CT70, CT90, etc. a few years ago, but it lives on in very cheap, Chinese replica form. I have seen one company's DAX 125cc even offered. I wouldn't consider going RTW on the C90 or the CT90 Trailbike, however, but might ride RTTown...
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 14 Jul 2006
Nigel Marx's Avatar
Super Moderator
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: South Island, New Zealand
Posts: 755
Not so.

They are still making the CT110. In NZ it is still a big seller, in two versions, the Postie version with 4 speeds, and the Farm version with the 4x2 gearbox. Still would be in my line-up, along with the more modern farm bikes like the Suzuki DF200 Trojan, and CT200 Honda, or Kawasaki KLX 250 Stockman, for a nobel RTW bike

Regards

Nigel in NZ
__________________
The mouth of a perfectly contented man is filled with . -- 2200 BC Egyptian inscription
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 14 Jul 2006
yuma simon's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Yuma, Arizona, USA
Posts: 456
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nigel Marx
They are still making the CT110. In NZ it is still a big seller, in two versions, the Postie version with 4 speeds, and the Farm version with the 4x2 gearbox. Still would be in my line-up, along with the more modern farm bikes like the Suzuki DF200 Trojan, and CT200 Honda, or Kawasaki KLX 250 Stockman, for a nobel RTW bike

Regards

Nigel in NZ
Nigel, do you have links to the "modern" CT's?
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 15 Jul 2006
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 1
Try this link

http://www.honda-motorcycles.co.nz/b...elID=126&type=

price new is NZ$4295, and secondhand price about half that for a 3-4 yr old model.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 15 Jul 2006
Nigel Marx's Avatar
Super Moderator
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: South Island, New Zealand
Posts: 755
And the Honda 200cc Farm bike is:
http://www.honda-motorcycles.co.nz/b...delID=99&type=
Regards

Nigel in NZ
__________________
The mouth of a perfectly contented man is filled with . -- 2200 BC Egyptian inscription
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 15 Jul 2006
yuma simon's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Yuma, Arizona, USA
Posts: 456
I remember there was a discussion about the 200 not too long ago. The CT is like the old mopeds from the 70's and 80's in the US. I was thinking about the mini-trail bikes. As a kid, I lusted after them, and owned one briefly in my teens. I think Honda stopped manufacturing them in 2000, and many Chinese companies produce replicas now, some with great quality.

http://www.atv-dirtbike.com/eec/dax50(110).html
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 16 Jul 2006
Wheelie's Avatar
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oslo, Norway
Posts: 457
My wife and I just got back from our African classic scooter adventure, you can read the blog here : http://www.gjolberg.com/capetown2nairobyblog.htm

First of all I see no problems riding on a 90 if you've got some kinky fetish for the bike. In my opinion you go with the bike you love and stick with her even if she is far from perfect.

If a BMW Dakar is the equivalent of a luxury hooker, then your Honda 90 is the equivalent of a high maintnance wife. If you choose to take the first one along on a vacation she will sure as hell show you a really good time, but you will never truely become a part of her life as she will never truely be yours. The second one you will have to love and cheerish or she will leave you stranded by the side of the road. Give her enough TLC and put up with all her flaws and ill temper, and she will not only take you to the moon and back, but you will get to be appart of her life. She will be yours as you have earned her, and you will cherish your moments with her far more than with the first option, promise! Choose your bike out of love! (Too bad we fall in love with trolls like Vespas and Honda 90's instead of bimmers and KTMs).

Financially the difference riding your Honda over a larger bike will only be negligble, even if you don't take into consideration the costs of traveling slower. If you want a bike with better performance, then put in some overtime a couple of weeks and buy it. There is no financial sound argument that favours the Honda...

As for a top speed of 55 mph, forget it. Fully loaded, some head wind, and some hills, can slow you down big time, especially if you want to preserve the engine by not pushing it to the limit... A top speed of 40-45 mph under average riding conditions is more like it (maybe even slower). The real killer in terms of making good time is your range, especially if you need to refill from jerry cans. Even if you hustle at fuel stops etc., don't expect an average of more than 25-35 mph in a days worth of riding, honest... So don't think you've got anything to gain by tuning your bike as your increased speed will be consumed by time wasted in refuling.

Sometimes it is nice to go slow through the scenery, but some times you can get a bit blasé. And, believe it or not, there will be lots of times where you will want to pass even slower trucks, etc. Personally I enjoyed the 75km/h cruising speeds of my Vespa (about 65 kmh im head wind, and even slower if combined with uphill). But there were times I wished for more power.

As for parts availability. Do you ever brake down next to a dealer? In todays day and age, with world wide courier coverage and web shops, you can get parts sendt anywhere if you have the time to wait for them (you might have to hitch a ride to the closest city to pick them up though). If you travel fast like me, with no time to waste, then you need to anticipate all probable bike problems and bring the tools, spares and knowledge to deal with them (I brought a total of 20 kg in spares/tools). In this case local availability doesn't matter. Whatever you do, try to source a great parts dealer or enthusiast willing to source and ship any part you need. Another option is to leave parts with a friend back home and have him send the part you will need... I brought spare shocks for instance, real bulky and heavy. Although they only have a small probability of braking, it does happen. Storing something like this at home and risk it not braking, could be a wise idea.

As for theft, your honda is still great for joy riding and is also easier to throw onto the back of a flat bed than a big touring bike for instance. I wouldn't choose a 90 in fear of theft.

As for trouble with officials etc, they harass pretty much everyone, rich or poor. But you may get friendly positive attention for your choice of vehicle, especially when you tell them how far you've gone and how far you are going. We got lots and lots of positive feedback I'm sure I never would have gotten from riding a bigger bike. So in this sence, it might help. But don't think you won't have to pay up because people don't think you have lots of money. You've got enough money for your own ride, no matter the type, you can pay what they are asking... as easy as that.

As I said, you will get lots of positive attention, but it is no chick magnet! One benefit I get from riding a Vespa is that there are clubs all over the world with people taking care of any need you might have. Vespa fans help eachother out, and as these must have been sold ten times over your honda 90, and virtually unchanged for 60 years (new parts fit old bikes and vice versa), parts and knowledge is readily available in all but a few places (like most of Africa). I have no idea if there is such a clan for your honda, but I would certainly check it out. It is not only great in time of technical need, but also for socialising. Come here with a Vespa and I will let you crash here for free few days...

Good luck
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 16 Jul 2006
Caminando's Avatar
Moderated Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: DogZone Country
Posts: 1,227
Smile Interesting

Wheelie,

A very thought-provoking post. I like it.

But you dont actually say if you've tried the Honda 90. So is this simply speculation or are your views based on fact/experience?

Good roads
Denis
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 7 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 7 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
honda transalp revýsýon ýn ýran,pakýstan... manumenen Southern Asia 5 9 Nov 2005 12:26
Honda Dealer - Baltics - Riga ghostridergary Repair Shops, Europe 0 8 Jul 2005 16:51
Honda Vigor Luggage Rack Tony Robson Honda Tech 0 17 Jun 2004 03:00
HONDA TRANSALP 650 BOND TRAVEL Bikes for Sale / Wanted 1 25 Mar 2003 20:25
Repair shop or Honda dealer in Barcelona Angeljim Repair Shops, Europe 0 12 Mar 2003 19:46

 
 



Renedian Adventures

HU DVD Summer Special!

Now that summer is here, get On the Road! Take 30% off the Achievable Dream - On the Road! 2-DVD set until August 31 only. Get On the Road! Learn the tips to staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure!

Our veteran travellers share their tips (and great stories) for staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure.

"A fantastic, informative and inspirational DVD."

"It's brilliant - thank you very much!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'ONTHEROAD' on your order when you checkout.

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 23:27.