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Poll: What make of travel bike do you ride ??
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What make of travel bike do you ride ??

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  #136  
Old 12 Nov 2010
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Originally Posted by colebatch View Post
KTM and BMW riders might rib each other all the time, but are currently (pretty much) the only 2 games in town for tough trips - if stats are anything to go by.
Your sample, of course, is biased by virtue of your location. Probably you'd draw the same conclusions in North Africa. In North, Central and South America I think you'd find more Kawasakis and Suzukis, much the same number of Yamahas, somewhat fewer BMW's and far fewer KTM's. This might explain the distribution in the poll results.....or not.

I'm sure not taking any sort of position on the very dodgy subject of which brand is more suited to what sort of journey. I'm just noticing how different my observations are from yours, perhaps because I've been traveling in different places.

Of course the next post will probably be from somewhere in South America by a rider who sees only BMW's and KTM's wherever he/she looks.

enjoy,

Mark
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  #137  
Old 13 Nov 2010
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Originally Posted by markharf View Post
Your sample, of course, is biased by virtue of your location.
Yes I did point that out ... that I suspected it was regionally biased.

Anywhere where Americans ride (like the Americas) I also suspect will feature more Japanese singles (particularly KLRs) and fewer European bikes.
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Last edited by colebatch; 13 Nov 2010 at 14:23.
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  #138  
Old 13 Nov 2010
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I totally agree that it's a regional thing.

Personally I've met lot of KTMs but mainly in Europe and a few in northern Africa (right now northern Africa is more or less limited to Morocco). I haven't seen many Suzukis but I've found the percentage of XTs higher in Africa then in Europe.
When it comes to Kawasaki I have hardly seen any but that's probably because my experience is mostly from Asia, Africa and Europe.
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  #139  
Old 13 Nov 2010
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Originally Posted by AliBaba View Post
When it comes to Kawasaki I have hardly seen any but that's probably because my experience is mostly from Asia, Africa and Europe.
Agree. They basically dont exist as a dual sport brand in Europe. When Europeans think of single cylinder Japanese dual sport bikes, they typically think of Suzuki DR/DRZs, Yamaha XTs or Honda XRs. I think the KLR never took off here because of the weight. They are 20kgs more than their peers.
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  #140  
Old 13 Nov 2010
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I think the choice of bike is governed more by market forces and price in the travellers country of origin rather than a carefully considered choice based on spec. or preconceptions about the terrain. GSes have a huge following in the UK and northern Europe. The vast majority have never seen an unpaved road but even so seeing them lined up in Tescos carpark has a significant influence on a prospective traveller looking to buy a bike for a RTW trip.

Those who are lucky enough to do a second trip are able to make a more considered choice based on experience, although it is interesting on Chris Scotts trip reports the number of people who say they would use the same bike again despite it downsides.
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  #141  
Old 13 Nov 2010
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Originally Posted by Magnon View Post
it is interesting on Chris Scotts trip reports the number of people who say they would use the same bike again despite it downsides.
If I were looking at another major trip, I'd be powerfully tempted to buy the same bike as the one I just finished wearing out simply because I've got several thousand dollars worth of transferable touring gear attached to it. Also: a stash of spare parts and a degree of familiarity with the bike with all its strengths and weaknesses. The last thing I want to do is spend loads of money and time accumulating all the stuff I've already got.

In North America, the choice in true dual sports is often viewed as BMW (expensive), KTM (expensive and not too common), Kawasaki KLR (common and cheap), Suzuki DR (common and somewhat more expensive), and sometimes Honda XR (less common and again somewhat more expensive). The big single Yamahas are seldom seen and generally unavailable.

Thus: most common once you get into Latin America and away from the pavement are probably Kawasaki, Suzuki and BMW, not necessarily in that order....and a high percentage of the BMW's are ridden by Europeans.

I am not trying to state a preference for one over the other, and I'm not addressing prejudices I might have about certain sorts of riders (and/or their branded accessories!). I merely meant to offer a possible explanation for those whose direct observations appeared to contradict the poll results.

The above is highly subjective, probably delusional, and should not be subjected to rigid statistical analysis of any sort.

Mark
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  #142  
Old 13 Nov 2010
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Originally Posted by markharf View Post
The above is highly subjective, probably delusional, and should not be subjected to rigid statistical analysis of any sort.
Great disclaimer
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  #143  
Old 25 Nov 2010
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Maybe we should leave it to Grant and MickyD .
Let them sort it out behind the scenes .
No need for a witch hunt and wayyyyyy.

[Now how can I cheat and make Norton the most popular bike in the poll ?]
Hi Dodger,
rest assured, you are not the only nortonian here.
Below a (dodgy) pic of us somewhere close to the White Highlands in Kenya, 1982.
Norton Mk3 Commando and BSA A65.
Still ride the same A65 and (another) Mk3.
Attached Thumbnails
What make of travel bike do you own ??-1982.jpg  

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  #144  
Old 25 Nov 2010
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I guess I like to visit odd places

http://www.our-site.me.uk/bike/larry/P1000186.JPG

and

http://www.our-site.me.uk/bike/larry/P1000230.JPG
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  #145  
Old 26 Nov 2010
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Paneuropean every time

I have had 3 Paneuropeans one 1100 2 1300s 98000 on the 1100 127000 on the 2004 pan
Now i have a 2009 pan rode Turkey north Africa Russia all europe never and probs good solid bike good on fuel not too hard on tyres first class touring bike..Mike
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  #146  
Old 21 Dec 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colebatch View Post
Yes I did point that out ... that I suspected it was regionally biased.

Anywhere where Americans ride (like the Americas) I also suspect will feature more Japanese singles (particularly KLRs) and fewer European bikes.

You're right, colebatch

Among my friends there are 6 KLRs and 1 XRL of the regular riders and we're all past 50.Because KLRs are available and inexpensive. I have three '92 KLRs , why? well who knows. They were all inexpensive . Why not have some back up? The three of them cost me less than $3000.00 in total.With $0 in V.A.T. Wouldn't you?
But I digress. The last time I took a multi thousand mile ride I rode my 1981 Yamaha XV 920. Purchased at at swapmeet {auto jumble} for $750.00 , it is low milage , low maintanance and if it gives trouble on the road, "walk awayable" no regrets.
I reject catagorization.
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Last edited by kbikey; 24 Dec 2010 at 18:23.
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  #147  
Old 23 Dec 2010
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For me familiarity bred contempt, and contempt turned into love-hate. On my last trip I swore down I would never touch an italian bike again but I have now aquired another overland bike that I am prepping for the next trip. It's a 1985 Cagiva, it's been raced and it's near totalled but it only cost 250 quid. I reckon it will cost about 400 to get fully prepped - most of the problems I had with the old one were with the air filter and electrics so I am replacing them all with a custom 'hand-made' loom and airbox and rebuidling the engine before I go anywhere. Whats the worst that can happen? (as I said that 'ironically' it shouldn't jinx me, in theory)

Bloody British weather, can't wait to get away!
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  #148  
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XT600e duh...
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  #149  
Old 9 May 2011
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  #150  
Old 13 May 2011
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Smile following fahion?

Like they always say, it's not what you have but how you use it!
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