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Route Planning Where to go, when, what are the interesting places to see
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  #1  
Old 23 Jan 2011
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1man1bike1world

Hello everyone,

My names Danny and as the title says, im planning on making a pilgrimage around the world sometime in 2013 me thinks

Since I don't really have much experience in "Adventure Motorcycling" so I thought I would write a little something something, to give you all ideas on where about I am with riding as well as planning;


So hi im Danny, I’ve been riding bikes for going on 4 years now and have been loving every minute of it. Years back I discovered the adventures of Ewan McGregor and Charlie Boorman in the Long Way Round, and I thought to myself ‘what a novel thought’. unknown to me at the time this little seed of adventure had been planted and awaited idle in my brain till the time it was needed.

Years Later and now with my bike (A Varadero XL125) I plan to take ‘my show on the road’ and have a damn good attempt at getting around the world (with a limited budget), naturally I wont be doing this on the Varadero, next month (February 2011) Ill be booking and hopefully passing my Module 2 Motorcycle test so I can finally remove those ugly L Plates and over the coming months ill be saving all my pennies and living like a Hermit so for my Birthday ill be able to afford my step up bike, im going GS oh yeh! (F800 to be exact) and spend the next year or so prepping myself and the bike ready for some ‘big’ adventures

I have a plan this year to do a nice 1300 mile trip from home to John O' Groats and back again to break in the GS as well as get myself reacquainted with camping, last time I camped out was in the Scouts... so its been a while.

From that I intend to maybe take a trip around Europe in 2012 to find myself in unfamiliar surroundings and then kick it big stylie for 2013 by trying to take on the world, route wise I have nothing planned, might end up going through all of Russia and not peaking out to Mongolia or Kazakhstan, but you never know, all I know is I want it to be a fun and memorable dream come true/trip


So yeh that about covers where im up to in life and where I intend to go from here onwards,, I know I have alot of reading and research ahead of me so any help is welcomed with open arms a hug and a cup of tea

Thank You all
Dan
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  #2  
Old 23 Jan 2011
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Sounds good Danny. I gave informal notice 2 weeks ago that I intend taking a years sabbatical for the same thing leaving UK on or around 1st September 2013 (to benefit from the tax rebate and to tie in with other personal stuff). This is my 55th birthday present to me. My plan is basically to get to Melbourne by spring of 2014, and then work out how to come back in time for restarting work in the July. I am currently considering taking my F650 Funduro although if I can't get to grips with the weight, I may have to downsize to a more appropriate DRZ400. I will keep a watch on your planning to make sure I don't miss anything

Deana

By the way, have you booked to go to Ripley in the spring. I went last year and it was invaluable
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Old 23 Jan 2011
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Hi and welcome to the HUBB, if you are planning on 'solo' trips what is wrong with using the 125 Honda? I have an aircooled GS R80 parked up in the garage and I am using a YBR 125 and lovin' it, I prefer nowadays 100+mpg than 100+mph.
So by using the Honda you will save on fuel, and Carnet costs against using a more expensive bike for the big trip.
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Old 23 Jan 2011
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Its funny you should mention that, I was thinking of trying to keep the Varadero as a "play thing"

In comparison fuel economy is about the same for the GS and the Vara both cracking out 200+ miles before complaining, i just really fancy the GS, its a stronger bike in comparison to the Vara, that bit taller and can take a drop better then anything else. its nothing like ooo BMW is a world beater etc, I just like the look of the bike and would be happy atop it for hours a day lol

I really am starting out at complete noob status, ill be checking out sorting a Carnet (in the future) as well as medical updates and injections (yay) as well as seeing if there is anything I can legally take with me i.e. a syringe and 2 sterile needles + whatever fluids needed


and thank you Deana ill be sure to keep an eye out as well in case you find any advice/kit that might be needed
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Old 23 Jan 2011
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You don't live in Walkley do you? Have seen a 125 Varadero buzzing about along South Road......

Are you really set on a GS? Once you're out of Europe there are massive benefits in having a simple, light weight Jap single (spares available most places and can be fixed without resorting to a computer). Also flying solo it's good having a bike that you can lift off yourself if it ends up on top of you - I learnt that the hard way.

I'd love an F800 R for Europe/UK road use but wouldn't go into the beyond onanything I wasn't totally happy dismantling and reassembling. Plus the cost of a GS is a lot of petrol and
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Old 23 Jan 2011
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Originally Posted by henryuk View Post
You don't live in Walkley do you? Have seen a 125 Varadero buzzing about along South Road......

Are you really set on a GS? Once you're out of Europe there are massive benefits in having a simple, light weight Jap single (spares available most places and can be fixed without resorting to a computer). Also flying solo it's good having a bike that you can lift off yourself if it ends up on top of you - I learnt that the hard way.

I'd love an F800 R for Europe/UK road use but wouldn't go into the beyond on anything I wasn't totally happy dismantling and reassembling. Plus the cost of a GS is a lot of petrol and
lol that's a Black one isnt it?? Nahh its not me but I know the rider on it,, he's had the bike about a month and dropped it 4 times,, and now he's bought a ZX6R (somehow) that he cant insure or ride yet (not even done theory test let alone MOD1 and MOD2), so that's going to rot....

Im more 'respectable' lol I have a Silver Varadero, usually with a Givi topbox and wearing all black Frank Thomas Gear, ill post up a pic shortly, its got some new 'street' styled graphics from my only off, thanks to the snow, but other then that all is good

and I hear what people are saying when it comes to choice of bike, my heart is set on the GS, I have 'some' technical knowledge and various sized hammers to sort out any problem, its all part of the journey, oh yeh ill end up b*tching and moaning about it but ill look back on it as the best time of my life
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Old 23 Jan 2011
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A factor lot's of people don't take into account is how much you 'like' a bike so good on you. As a Cagiva rider I can't really comment on reliability over 'soul'!

I would fully recommend going to Ripley if you can make it, good chance to see lots of bikes and get different perspectives on how to 'overland'.
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  #8  
Old 23 Jan 2011
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Ok I found afew pics on my Twitpic to moisten peoples appetites,, the last 3 are pretty 'graphic' but you will be happy to know im still alive, off was about 2 weeks ago

Fueled up ready for adventure first time out in nearly 2 w... on Twitpic

It was my ribs vs. A touring screen,,, who won?? on Twitpic
I like the new monster styling,,, very mean looking on Twitpic
The Honda Varadero, now with 'street' styled graphi... on Twitpic

Try to imagine, 10mph on a flat road (with snow) having survived steep hills up and down and horrid bends, pooting along when suddenly the bike slips out from under you,, somehow you are sky-rocketed forwards, hit the screen, keep going, break the screen, superman fly forwards, land on your left ankle and barrel roll onto your back 10 feet away....

That's pretty much what I remember and some lovely people helping me and the bike to my feet, thank god for RAC Break down, dont thank god for a 2 hour wait in the snow,, then thank god again for the thermal linings in my gear

Since the off im back to using the standard screen which for lack of better words "sucks" when it comes to wind protection

Ill have to have a look at Ripley and see if I can make it
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Old 23 Jan 2011
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Ah well, if you haven't binned a bike then you're not trying hard enough!
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Old 23 Jan 2011
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Ah well, if you haven't binned a bike then you're not trying hard enough!
I couldn't agree more,,, 1st purchase on next bike,, engine bars!
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  #11  
Old 23 Jan 2011
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Fantastic, congratulations on your decision to make the trip . Now the trick is to stay insane until departure .

IMO, the F800 is an excellent bike for the job. You have plenty of time to get to know your bike.

I'll be looking forward to your up dates .
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Old 23 Jan 2011
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Thank you Thomas and I agree staying insane is the hard part! I just need to get this test out of the way then I can refocus on buying and learning, also little trips like Ripley and JOG should be a good way to get used to riding for fun again
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Old 24 Jan 2011
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Old 24 Jan 2011
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Hi,

there are as many philosophies and ways to go about motorcycle adventuring as there are riders.. and then some more.

My reccomendation is to Purchase Chris Scott's book "Adventure Motorcycling Handbook", which is a great resource for planning. Then You should buy Emilio Scooto's book "The Longest Ride", which will not inspire you, but show you that it is possible to go RTW for 10 years, visiting every country in the world, with a bike that most would says wouldn't be up for the job, with no prior experience... and this after having been robbed for everything he owned the first day riding, including all his clothes and money, but fortunately not his bike. You could set out tomorrow if you had to.

My philosophy is this, if you have a working vehicle - regardless of what it is, it will get you there. Traveling on A vVespa like I do might be the equivalent of wiping ones ass with grass instead of luscious silky toilet paper equivalent of a BMW F 1200 GS Adventure - but at least one is wiping ones ass... so to speak. And frankly, I prefer the grass. It makes me feel like a real man

Also, the tighter your time restraints are over the distance planned, the more self reliant you must be. If you plan to travel a long way in a hurry, then you need more money at hand, more parts and tools, and more experience in turning a wrench than if you were traveling slow. If you travel slow, you can hail a tow to the nearest town where repair assistance can be offered, and you can wait for parts to be shipped in from the other end of the world. If you are traveling slow, there may be opportunities to stop to make some money, and to look out the cheapest means of self sustenance (food and shelter). Also, if you travel slow, you have time to sort out visas andd other paper requirements as you go along, a luxury which fast travelers don't have. There is an Italian who did a RTW on a classic Vespa, carrying nothing but a guitar.
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