Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Bicycles > Overland Bicycle Travel

Overland Bicycle Travel Overlanding questions for two wheels, no motor!
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11 Jul 2008
Matt Cartney's Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Edinburgh, Lothian, Scotland
Posts: 1,351
One day trip - How far?

Hi,

this isn't really a cycle touring question (as the trip will only be one day), I just thought I'd take the opportunity to ask the question of experienced long distance cyclists.

I'm hoping to do a 'sponsored cycle' in late september. It's not an organised mass event, just me on my lonesome. I was going to raise money for a charity by doing the Edinburgh marathon this year, but my dodgy hip and knee proved to be a bit too dodgy to complete the training.

So, I've decided to do a section of the Sustrans 'Route 7' that goes through the Highlands and I'm trying to decide how far would constitute a reasonable challenge. I was thinking either do 100 miles or 200km (124 miles).

I will doing it on my mountain bike (fitted with slicks and drop handlebars). It will be on roads and high quality cycle paths. I am currently what I would call 'averagely fit'. i.e. after injuring myself training for the marathon I have lost a lot of fitness, but can still fit into my 32" waist jeans (but not for long if I don't start exercising soon!). My intention is to 'cross train'. 1 40 minute run, 1 half hour swim and two cycles a week, for the next two months. One short cycle (half an hour or so) and one longer at the weekend (building up distance as I go). I am 36.

It's a long time since I did much more than cycle round my local mountain bike park at Glentress, so I'd be interested in what people think. I'd like to do the 200km as it sounds good! but will satisfy myself with 100 miles if necessary. How would cycling 200km compare with running a marathon, for instance, in terms of how physically exhausting and difficult it would be.

Thanks,

Matt
__________________
http://adventure-writing.blogspot.com

http://scotlandnepal.blogspot.com/

*Disclaimer* - I am not saying my bike is better than your bike. I am not saying my way is better than your way. I am not mocking your religion/politics/other belief system. When reading my post imagine me sitting behind a frothing pint of ale, smiling and offering you a bag of peanuts. This is the sentiment in which my post is made. Please accept it as such!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11 Jul 2008
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 1,037
Matt

If you push yourself hard on the training rides doing 200km on tarmac in a day should be fine. The South Downs way is a 120 mile off road race and a friend of mine has managed to do it both ways in a day (left his car at the start). Admittedly he is psycho-hard and was on the bike for 20 hours....

Eat stupid amounts of food for a few weeks before, start early and don't push hard early on. A long time at a nice leisurely pace will clock up more miles.

Given your dodgy hip and knee it might be worth seeing if you can borrow a recumbant, much much better for tarmac miles. Another friend took a recumbant to Beijing overland and was averaging about 250 miles a day and he reckoned that he wasn't having to try too hard (again he is some kind of super-hero)

I am MASSIVELY unfit and on my few and far between forays into the Peak I can normally manage about 50 kms in about 4 hours (off road though). If you assume an average speed of 30km/h then you could do the 200 in 7 hours which gives you a lot of leeway if you plan for a 14 hour day
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11 Jul 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 3,370
It's a good question Matt: you know in your heart of hearts that you can do it if you really want to.
Do you want to do the distance, and be reasonally fit to go home or do whatever, or do you want to do the distance and just collapse in a heap at the end, is one consideration.

The guys I know who road ride regularly think little of putting in 150+ mile round trips for a day out - not my cup of tea, but there you are, it is done regularly by the cycling clubs. When I was much younger and fitter I rode about 70 miles in a day and the chain came off the chainwheel every time I free-wheeled downhill - the moral is make sure that the pushbike is fit for purpose and you should have few problems.
__________________
Dave
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11 Jul 2008
Matt Cartney's Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Edinburgh, Lothian, Scotland
Posts: 1,351
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walkabout View Post
It's a good question Matt: you know in your heart of hearts that you can do it if you really want to.
.
Thanks for the replies folks. You've pretty much got it in a nutshell there, Walkabout. I just want to make sure I'm not setting myself an unrealistic challenge. From what you guys say, 200km should be doable as long as I buckle down and train.

Henry, you know some mad 'uns! Good tip re: the carbo-loading. I'd forgotten about that particular benefit of silly endurance challenges! Although whether my own take on carbo-loading (many pub burgers and pints of heavy) is the same as that of, say, the olympic team, is another thing.

Matt
__________________
http://adventure-writing.blogspot.com

http://scotlandnepal.blogspot.com/

*Disclaimer* - I am not saying my bike is better than your bike. I am not saying my way is better than your way. I am not mocking your religion/politics/other belief system. When reading my post imagine me sitting behind a frothing pint of ale, smiling and offering you a bag of peanuts. This is the sentiment in which my post is made. Please accept it as such!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11 Jul 2008
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 1,037
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Cartney View Post
Although whether my own take on carbo-loading (many pub burgers and pints of heavy) is the same as that of, say, the olympic team, is another thing.

Matt
I reckon lager would be better for carbo-loading, but can't stand the stuff.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11 Jul 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 3,370
Wink Guinness is good for you

Guinness, and only Guinness hits the spot for me!
__________________
Dave
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11 Jul 2008
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 1,037
ah but 'Guinness for Strength', surely this is more of an endurance event?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11 Jul 2008
mustaphapint's Avatar
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Hampshire, UK
Posts: 398
Good luck Matt. I have been a keen cyclist since I was about 12. Time trials, road racing and mountain biking. Always wanted to ride a 12 hour event, which I did when I was 40 (about 14 years ago) I managed just over 220 miles, which is relatively mediocre in competition and dropped from nearly 11 stone to just over 10 in 1 day. Although I still enjoy an occasional ride I've not done any serious riding since then.
If you're reasonably fit, used to sitting in the saddle and eat and drink enough 200k shouldn't be a problem.
__________________
If you think you are too small to make a difference you have never spent the night with a mosquito.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 31 Jul 2008
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 761
just back from 2 weeks cycling. I was doing around 50 miles every day (longest 75 miles), which was fairly easy spread over the whole day. I hadn't done any cycling beforehand. 200 km is achievable, I guess depending on the terrain and climbs. just like the marathon though, you need time in the saddle beforehand.

if your seat position and bar position are correct, then it's no more tiring than a motorbike ride for 6 hours. But if you are used to short rides you might not feel, or realise, if your saddle/bar position is correct. Spending a few long rides working this out will give you a better chance of success (well, without extreme pain).

doug
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 31 Jul 2008
Matt Cartney's Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Edinburgh, Lothian, Scotland
Posts: 1,351
Thanks Harleyrider. That is some effort, 220 miles in 12 hours! I was going to use two 1 litre bottles in cages and will have a small bag on a rack for energy foods: probably energy bars and bananas. Originally toying with using the camelback I use for mountain biking, but reckon it might chafe on such a long day, so reckon old fashioned bottle cages and rack might be a better bet.

How did your trip go Dougie? Hope you had good weather. I have a couple of different bar/saddle options available and am going to play until I find the right combination.

Matt
__________________
http://adventure-writing.blogspot.com

http://scotlandnepal.blogspot.com/

*Disclaimer* - I am not saying my bike is better than your bike. I am not saying my way is better than your way. I am not mocking your religion/politics/other belief system. When reading my post imagine me sitting behind a frothing pint of ale, smiling and offering you a bag of peanuts. This is the sentiment in which my post is made. Please accept it as such!
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 31 Jul 2008
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 761
I did about 600 miles over all. I was glad not to wear any rucksack, not only do you have the potential chaffing, you will also sweat a lot as there's no air getting to your back. I bungeed a couple of 1.5 litre bottles onto the rear rack when needed, as well as two bidons in the frame bottle cages. it got to about 30 degrees some days. It was a great trip though, good to see the difference to travelling by moto.

http://www.soogate.com/france/Pages/74.html

have you heard of the london-edinburgh-london? I think the next one is in 2009, if your knees could take it.

there's also this: Pedal for Scotland - Accept the Challenge if you (or any others) fancy this?
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Trip report of 4-monts trip thruogh south america burnout1 South America 6 22 May 2008 07:39
My trip so far. McGowan Europe 6 10 Dec 2007 19:27
Fun of trip planning vs. trip itself fatboyfraser Route Planning 9 16 Aug 2006 16:50
ME Trip ozhanu Middle East 12 25 Aug 2005 22:10
trip Mark Smith Travellers Seeking Travellers 0 11 Feb 2003 05:44

 
 



Renedian Adventures

HU DVD Summer Special!

Now that summer is here, get On the Road! Take 30% off the Achievable Dream - On the Road! 2-DVD set until August 31 only. Get On the Road! Learn the tips to staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure!

Our veteran travellers share their tips (and great stories) for staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure.

"A fantastic, informative and inspirational DVD."

"It's brilliant - thank you very much!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'ONTHEROAD' on your order when you checkout.

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:21.