Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Technical, Bike forums > Other Bikes Tech

Other Bikes Tech For Technical Questions on bikes not listed in the other forums. Questions comparing which bike is best etc go in the "Which Bike" forum.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 28 Nov 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Sax, Spain
Posts: 919
Home made Chain Oiler, 5 Euros!

OK, here it is! it was a doddle to make, and it works pretty good, more testing to be done in Daylight tomorrow.....
here are some pics of the various steps. took me less than 1 hour start to finish (ok I had a break for lunch to let the glue dry, but actual build time less than an Hour) enjoy!

bottle cable tied in position, awaiting addition of tubing, 250ml bottle, would prefer 150ml or 100ml

above: there is a piece of plastic lolly stick jammed between the cable ties to separate them and keep them firmly in the end of the tube, i am just enlarging the hole to allow better oil flow

here you can see the piece of brazing rod i used ( you could use copper wire or a bit of Coathanger)
this makes it easier to position the end "feeders", the inside edges of the "feeders, which are made from cable ties are grooved with a Stanley knife blade , 3 grooves lengthwise, to aid with the flow of oil to the tip


Above: the tap here is in the "ON" position, if the lever was straight up, it would be in the "OFF" position

In the above picture Inoticed the end was too near the sprocket so then adjusted it, that is why there is wire inside the tubing, so it can be bent and keeps its shape..... Note: Oil is visible just a drip, right on the very Tip, the grooves are working!
so far so good......... if anyone wants step by step instructions I will post all the pics ( about 35 and instructions) on instructables.com with a link


Above: Finished Installation.

cheers

Martyn

Last edited by Martynbiker; 28 Nov 2007 at 21:22. Reason: more info
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 28 Nov 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 3,337
Thumbs up

Nice work Martyn - you might remember this thread about the same topic:

http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hub...in-oiler-28074

So, one question - why do all of these systems go to the back sprocket and not the (nearer) front drive sproket?
__________________
Dave
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 28 Nov 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Ripley, Derbyshire
Posts: 375
If they were put on the front sproket you would have the oil splashing all over your engine block just after it hits the chain, causing that horrible smell and smoke.

Where as if it's on the rear then it just goes over your tires when your riding slowly, something you have to watch out for.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 28 Nov 2007
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 1,037
plus you want the oil to be driven into the chain from the sprocket by centrifugal force, putting the oil on the rear sprocket allows the chain to be in contact with the oily sprocket for longer - and if you mounted on the front you would have to get it onto the top of the sprocket for it to work at all, which would be logistically difficult.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 28 Nov 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Oxford UK
Posts: 1,013
My DIY oiler, that I posted about some time ago, originally went to the rear sprocket but from day one had a problem with oil dripping onto the tyre when the bike was parked.
I moved the outlet to the top of the front sprocket back in the summer and so far so good. There is a bit of overoiling splash but it drips onto the bashplate and away from the tyre
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 28 Nov 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Sax, Spain
Posts: 919
thats why this is here.........

Quote:
Originally Posted by backofbeyond View Post
from day one had a problem with oil dripping onto the tyre when the bike was parked.
Thats why I fitted this little tap!.....no more drips unless i forget to turn it off.......and knowing myself that will be 90% of the time!

Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 28 Nov 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Ripley, Derbyshire
Posts: 375
Back of Beyond, can you make it so that the oil line gets an air bubble in it while the bikes parked over night, just route the line above the oil reserviour the pressure difference will pull air into the line when your stopped.

That's what I've done that way the oil only starts to come out after about 5-7 minutes riding, only thing is slow riding through traffic or when stationary and the bikes running, then I normally get a few drips.

I've not checked since I put on my Touratech Chain Guide last week as I now have it running down into that first then going on the chain, I'm hoping it would stop some of the mess, I will check it once it's light again.

Hope that helps.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 28 Nov 2007
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 1,037
erm, is this a gravity fed system or is it powered off a manifold spigot?

If it is gravity fed then I'm afraid putting the resevoir lower would cause it to stop alltogether
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 29 Nov 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Oxford UK
Posts: 1,013
Quote:
Originally Posted by juddadredd View Post
Back of Beyond, can you make it so that the oil line gets an air bubble in it while the bikes parked over night, just route the line above the oil reserviour the pressure difference will pull air into the line when your stopped.

That's what I've done that way the oil only starts to come out after about 5-7 minutes riding, only thing is slow riding through traffic or when stationary and the bikes running, then I normally get a few drips.

Hope that helps.
I think drips are inherent in my design because of the long tube that goes from the reservoir to the sprocket. In martyn's design the tap is located close to the sprocket and will probably have minimal drip from the tube (if he remembers to turn it off!).
His bike has the stand on the same side as the chain so that when parked the sprocket leans away from the tyre and drips go on the floor, mine unfortunately has the chain on the other side so drips fall onto the tyre. The oil for these drips come from tube drainage and with a long tube going from the reservoir it takes a fair while to drain. Using one of martyn's taps would have been a good idea but I made the oiler out of scrap lying around in the garage and didn't find a tap.
I can see the principal behind your "block it with a bubble" idea, I'm just not clear on how I could make it work in practice.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 29 Nov 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Sax, Spain
Posts: 919
I need a rethink!

Quote:
Originally Posted by backofbeyond View Post
My DIY oiler, that I posted about some time ago, originally went to the rear sprocket but from day one had a problem with oil dripping onto the tyre when the bike was parked.
I moved the outlet to the top of the front sprocket back in the summer and so far so good. There is a bit of overoiling splash but it drips onto the bashplate and away from the tyre
Backof beyond, after todays run out, im going to change my design! to front sprocket oiling like yours........ Because..

1.) the oils oversplash on rear tyre caused some amazing sideways nearly brown trouser moments today!

2.) when I fiddled with the end of the tube to try to move it away from the sprocket it made the problem worse.

3.) I think I am going to go back to the drawing board, remove the lot and redesign with brackets rather than cable ties and a better oil delivery system. for safetys sake if nothing else!

Martyn
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 29 Nov 2007
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia
Posts: 1,366
Too much oil.

And possibly the wrong place?

On an old bike I had .. the oil was contained in the swing arm, a needle valve controlled the flow - both on and off and its rate. The flow was directed to the chain just before it contacted the rear sproket. I think this is the longest run of chain where it is most stable (whre it goes around teh sproket, so the oil has a chance not to be splashed off. As the chain/oil went around teh sproket the oil would be centrifically flug towards the outer surface of the chain - having been delivered to the inner surface - if did get good coverage. You don't need much oil at all, I used to leave it on for a cup of tea... may be a drop afterwards. The side stand was on the side with the chain so drops if they fell - fell away from the tyre.


Before you build it permant - experiment as to

1) rate of flow.
2) where to put the oil.

Good luck - and let us know how it goes.
__________________
---
Regards Frank Warner
motorcycles BMW R80 G/S 1981, BMW K11LT 1993, BMW K75 G/S
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 30 Nov 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Oxford UK
Posts: 1,013
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martynbiker View Post

I think I am going to go back to the drawing board, remove the lot and redesign with brackets rather than cable ties and a better oil delivery system. for safetys sake if nothing else!

Martyn
It's not clear from the pics but I can't see anything in your system that limits the rate at which the oil flows down the tube. I jammed a piece of plastic with a 2mm ? hole (mig welder liner) at the end of the clear tubing to limit the flow rate. This makes sure the oil doesn't flood out. The reservoir end also has a 3mm outlet to limit the flow rate down the tube. These holes are really too small for my normal 90 grade gear oil in the winter but fine in the summer. You're only looking for a drip a minute or so.

What it comes down to, I suppose, is how much time and effort you want to put into these things. I did consider knocking up a needle valve based control system on the lathe using carburettor jets / needles and calibrating it against temperature and oil viscosity but it would have been easier just to go and buy one - secondhand scottoilers come up regularly on ebay.

An electronically controlled pumped system is probably the way to go and there are several designs to crib on the internet (mainly in german for some reason), some of them looking like they cost more than the bike they are fitted to. I tried to convince my son that building one of them would be perfect for his gcse electronics project - particularly as he was doing german gcse as well, but I think he saw through the ploy.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 30 Nov 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Sax, Spain
Posts: 919
flow rate adjusters!!!! lol

Quote:
Originally Posted by backofbeyond View Post
It's not clear from the pics but I can't see anything in your system that limits the rate at which the oil flows down the tube. .
The little chrome "TAP" is actually an aquarium air-flow adjuster, used to adjust the rate of air flowing to an air-stone from a pump....... therefore it SHOULD also limit the flow of oil. I just need to practice how far to turn it.

Martyn
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 5 Dec 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: kuala lumpur
Posts: 219
Im interested!!

Hey Martyn,

please send the step by step guide. (is it completed yet?)
Im the type that likes to forget/lazy to oil my chain

Had my DID snapped in the midlle of a back road, during a 400km ride, Luckily I was still in the area where public buses & workshops were still
nearby.




Ride Safe/Save/Sober
__________________
Ride
Safe,
Sober,
& Save!
"man without beard is like porridge without salt": Ned Kelly
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 5 Dec 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Sax, Spain
Posts: 919
Step by step

Quote:
Originally Posted by Osama Radzi View Post
Hey Martyn,

please send the step by step guide. (is it completed yet?)
Im the type that likes to forget/lazy to oil my chain

Had my DID snapped in the midlle of a back road, during a 400km ride, Luckily I was still in the area where public buses & workshops were still
nearby.




Ride Safe/Save/Sober

Hiya Osama, still a few pics to add and some more revised instructions ( such as try using thicker oil if you value your ass/bike/sanity) will get it finished before the weekend, if you PM me your email addy I will send it off to you ASAP.

Martyn
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Homemade chain oiler Dodger Other Bikes Tech 12 1 Sep 2007 08:59
home made pannier severin Other Bikes Tech 5 22 May 2007 05:46
Home made top case - secure and lock? Wheelie Equipment Reviews 12 28 Feb 2006 17:08
Home made fuel filter usl Equipping the Bike - what's the best gear? 0 17 Jan 2003 02:23

 
 
 

NEW! HU 2015 Motorcycle Adventure Travel Calendar is now available! Get your copy now for some terrific travel inspiration!

HUGE, 11.5 x 16.5 inches, beautifully printed in Germany on top quality stock! Photos are the winning images from over 600 entries in the 9th Annual HU Photo Contest!

Horizons Unlimited 2015 Motorcycle Adventure Travel Calendar.

"The calendar is magnificent!"

"I just wanted to say how much I'm loving the new, larger calendar!"

We share the profit with the winning photographers. YOU could be in the HU Calendar too - enter here!


HU DVD Autumn Special!

Take 40% off Road Heroes Part 1 until October 31 only!

Road Heroes features tales of adventure, joy and sheer terror by veteran travellers Peter and Kay Forwood (193 countries two-up on a Harley); Dr. Greg Frazier (5 times RTW); Tiffany Coates (RTW solo female); and Rene Cormier (University of Gravel Roads).

The first in an exciting new series, Road Heroes features tales of adventure, joy and sheer terror by veteran travellers."Inspiring and hilarious!"

"I loved watching this DVD!"

"Lots of amazing stories and even more amazing photographs, it's great fun and very inspirational."

"Wonderful entertainment!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'HEROES' on your order when you checkout.



Scottoiler automatic chain oilers. The most important accessory for your next motorcycle adventure!


Renedian Adventures


Renedian Adventures

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 18:52.