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  #1  
Old 8 Jul 2005
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Converting KLR650 type C

Hello I am from the UK and was after the US spec model-A KLR650, however I am struggling to find one for sale in the UK. I was wondering if it is relatively easy to convert a type C (Eurp spec) to the Type A ie. bigger tank etc. Or otherwise does anyone know how much to import a type A model. ALso what is the luggage capacity on the type C KLR650 I heard it was just 3 kgs, will I be able to fit panniers or has anyone else done so on the type C.

Thank you

Ben
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  #2  
Old 24 Feb 2006
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Having both models standing around here:
You can fit almost everything onto the KL650C except the windshield which is frame mounted and needs a bracket to bolt onto the steering head.
The KL650A's wheels and rear suspension are a lot nicer (Aluminium rims and swingarm and easy preload adjustment of rear shock.
Not too sure if you can squeeze the KL650A's instrument with rev counter under the C's windshield but the A's instrument is steering mounted and it might work.
The luggage capcity refers to the C's hilarious speedo drying rack (I would not call it a luggage rack) which is rated 3kg max by a sticker next to it.
The A comes with a compound aluminium / polyamid carrier big and flat and with decent hooks to strap down a crate of with ease.
The A's tank fits onto the C's frame but I am not too sure if you also have to use the A#s seat. Just know that the mountings on the frame are identical. You also have to use the radiator covers matching the tank.
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  #3  
Old 27 Feb 2006
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You could order a rear sub-frame from the A-model from www.motorcycleframes.us. I would recommend a mounting hardware upgrade kit from www.dual-star.com to go with it. . The model-A tank or aftermarket larger tank would fit, however I don't know if the seat from the C-model would fit snugly against the tank. Corbin does make a seat for the KLR A-model, it is slightly lower than the stock seat.

[This message has been edited by ct_miller13 (edited 27 February 2006).]
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  #4  
Old 29 Mar 2006
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Hi There,
just came across your message,
havent been on this site for a while, I have used this help and hints site for converting my own klr 650c for a round-the-world-trip.
see also www.overland-solutions.com (the displayed klr is mine). Ernie converted and reinforced (incl. subframe) my bike completely. Also equipped with touratech panniers.

However: because changes in my life (married...), I will not use the bike for a round-the-world, Therefore the bike is for sale.
If you are interested or want more information on the changes I made on my bike please contact me:
gijswalenkamp@web.de

cheers,
gijs
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  #5  
Old 30 Mar 2006
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How much are you selling it for please.

Thank you

Ben
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  #6  
Old 21 Oct 2006
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Changing the KLR650 C to an A

Funny, here in the states I was looking to switch an "A" rear end to a "C" rear end for the Classic Kawi Tail look, hows come you want to change yours from the C to the A ? I really dig the c look
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  #7  
Old 24 Oct 2006
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Fat bum

Agree the A tail looks crap compared to the elegant C tail. My C's also never ate license plates :-) The C's "rack" is pathetic, more a beach towel holder. My bikes went out with tubular brackets for locally manufactured extra large Gearsack copies cabletied to the rack. Never had problems with that (typically carrying some 15kg of luggage behind the seat).
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  #8  
Old 16 Jan 2008
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conversion from 'A' to 'C' model KLR650.

I HAVE ACTUALLY COMPLETED A CONVERSION, SO HOPEFULLY THE BELOW INFO WILL BE OF HELP;
I started with an old 1988 KLR650 -A.
I had to fit a 'C' model sub-frame and rear inner wheel-arch. Apart from that, everything fits fine. The bolt holes all match up perfectly.
The front of the inner wheel arch does fit but has to be trimmed down a little on each side to fit the existing brackets.
The wiring is a straight swap (except you end up with 2 spare wires from the old 'A' number plate light - not needed on the 'C' model light).
The rear brake reservoir is simply moved onto the rear sub-frame (where it used to be bolted to the main frame. I cut the rubber supply pipe back about 2 inches, but apart from that, it fits fine.
I have kept the 'A' model headlight cowling, as to fit the 'C' model would have involved loads of replacement parts and I think it would not have looked as good as the old one either. It does not touch the new tank on full lock and the standard indicators can also be kept.
The 'C' sub-frame has 4 hooks (I pressume for luggage to be tied on), which I removed with an angle grinder as they have no use for me and look horrible (as well as frequently ripping your clothing I suspect).
The helmet lock can be moved onto the 'C' subframe, but you have to make one of the frame holes a little bigger to fit the lock.
Rear footrests can be fitted onto the 'C' frame (although in a different way) but is an easy thing to do.
The main exhaust is fitted differently, but with the aid of a longer bolt and a large rubber grommet - it now fits better than the original one ever did (with no alteration to the exhaust itself).
I am now in possession of an old 1988 'A' model, that looks exactly like a newer 2001 'C' model - at very little expence & effort.

As the bike (for me) is used purely for fun, it is a better choice for me (& it looks far nicer), but to swap the parts the other way (from 'C' to 'A') would be a little more awkward, as you would need to replace the sub-frame, re-mount the rear brake reservoir (no standard fittings left), replace the inner wheel-arch (it will be to narrow), add a little wiring (number plate light) & move the front indicators somewhere else (you may have to alter the 'C' headlight cowling if it touches the new tank) > as well as replacing all the bodywork (including both side panels). You may also have trouble with the fork stantions touching the tank on full lock.
If anyone is thinking of doing this, I hope this is of help.

I obviously have a load of 'A' model bits spare now (including a sub-frame), which if you ever need - let me know (but with the weight, I would imagine postage to be a bit expensive).
All the best, RAY.
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  #9  
Old 17 Jan 2008
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Nice one! Did you keep the A tank, or replace it with the smaller C tank? I presume you put on the C tank, as otherwise, the C seat would not match the C subframe, and the A tank!

Don't forget that in replacing the tank and subframe, you typically obsolete any engine bars / pannier racks that you have installed.. that what made me hum and haw about the conversion of my C! That stuff is expensive to replace.
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  #10  
Old 18 Jan 2008
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Thumbs up conversion from 'A' to 'C' model KLR650.

Colm,
Yes, I now have the smaller 'C' tank fitted with radiator shrouds on either side. I never had engine bars or panniers fitted, as the bike is purely for fun (although if I came across some engine bars I may fit them which should not be any problem).
Initially (before I got the 'C' sub-frame), I did fit the new tank and as you say, the new seat does not fit as there is then a gap between the 2 of about 4 inches (neither does any other 'c' panel fit without the sub-frame replacement).
The bike does look a lot smaller now and I would imagine it to be a little lighter as well. I don't think it would be an ideal bike if I were to do long distances, but I only really use it in the countryside around my home (hills, mountains, dirt tracks 'etc'). So I now have a bike which is easy to get most of the parts for, but if I dent or break any of the bodywork > it could be a replacement problem.
I intend to get another bike in the next year or so (I'm thinking of a harley V-rod), but will keep the KLR as well, as an 'everyday' sort of bike. Initially I bought the bike as it was very cheap and as I had not ridden for about 20 years, I thought it the best sort of bike to 'practice' on > but it is to much fun to dispose of it. Also, one of the previous messages mentions that the rack on the 'C' model is only good for a beach towel > well, thats perfect as that is all that is ever going to be put on it (i'm only 2km from the Mediterranean sea).
Have you got your KLR back on the road now.
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  #11  
Old 18 Jan 2008
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Yeah, my C is back up and running, with a non standard CDI unit (from Ignitech), cos the OEM Kawasaki unit was 290 GBP + VAT.. My starfish hurts just thinking about paying that! The only unusual thing I've noticed with the new CDI is that the default programming only allows the bike to start with the stand down, regardless of whether it's in gear, or where the clutch is at.. ie, thats different from the OEM.

Lucky you, with the Med right beside you. I used to live in Barcelona, and it's nothing like rainy London (or Dublin, for that matter)!
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  #12  
Old 21 Jan 2008
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Since the dollar is so weak

just pop over and buy an '08 for just over USD 5k.
http://www.kawasaki.com/Products/Detail.aspx?id=221
Has 6.1 GALLON tank,which is equal to 537 litres,I believe.
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I spent most of my money on fast cars,fast women and liquor.The rest I squandered.
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  #13  
Old 23 Jan 2008
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Sidestand ?

Colm,
I have not played around with the side-stand, but could you not either short out the 2 wires that go to it, or permanently separate them (the opposite of whatever way it is wired up now) > which would sort out your starting problems.
I take it the CDi was taken from the bike when it was stolen > with the price of them, you can understand why the bike was stolen now (although second-hand ones on e-bay seem to be a lot more affordable and as far as I am aware, the 3 models are the same).
Also, I may be right next to the med, but when you live in a place, you tend to ignore what is in your own back-yard (I rarely go down to the sea front now). The climate is a lot better than the UK though > I don't think i'll ever be returning on a permanent basis.
All the best, RAY.
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  #14  
Old 23 Jan 2008
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They (the local scumbag rodent pencil-neck excuses for kids that seem to infest where I live) shorted out the ignition wires to try to hot wire it, and blew the CDI.. I still have the unit, and it's a nice paperweight, but thats about its only use to me now..

I don't currently have the sidestand switch issues.. but I realised the importance of it when I had some problems with the bike in Trieste (a truly dead boring place to be stuck, in my humble opinion!). That time, I cleaned everything up, let it dry, inspected and re-fitted the switches, and my prob disappeared. Was probably just a loose connection on the side stand switch, i think.

I bought a non-runner Tengai just for parts, and it cost me 307 GBP on ebay.. if just the CDI worked, it pretty much would have paid for itself.. In the end, because I got the Ignitech CDI on the web, I didn't need to cannibalise the Tengai, so I got it running instead.. Some people would call that conniving to get a second bike, but I call it chance..

Never a truer word.. most people ignore whats in their own back yard. I'm guilty of that too.
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