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Equipping the Bike - what's the best gear? Anything to do with the bikes equipment, saddlebags, etc. Questions on repairs and maintenance of the bike itself belong in the Brand Specific Tech Forums.
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Giant Loop Motorcycle Saddlebags & Motorcycle Tank Bags: Panniers, Soft Luggage for Adventure & Sport Touring

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  #31  
Old 9 Feb 2010
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I Have the 150piece kit (not sure if its still available but the same gear), best toolkit i have ever bought!! Used the 3/8 ratchet to undo cylinder bolts with a 2foot bar on the end.. Very good quality and tuff
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  #32  
Old 21 Feb 2010
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Must have is: duct tape (buy good one! not cheap). You can put the duct tape on the handles of your tools to save space. I also carry a set or two of these:

Touratech Webshop

And they proved to be very usefull to keep the back of my frame attached to the rest of the bike after it broke. Probably they don't do miracles, but they definatly worth the buck.

Other aspects have been touched here.

Good luck!
Adrian
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  #33  
Old 21 Mar 2010
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I tend to keep the older bikes, for some reason Im stuck in the 80's so I try to standardise nuts and bolts so i can take minimun tools and all good quality. But you cant go past fencing wire and baling twine for tempory fixes, just ask any cocky and now keep some of each attached to the bike somewhere.
Ernie.
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  #34  
Old 21 Mar 2010
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Consider welding your wheel nut socket to one end of your tyre lever to create a kind of multi tool. Jim
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  #35  
Old 13 Oct 2010
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Tools for the trip

Call me over cautious, but I always carry a multi meter.
Good for tracking down electrical gremlins.
It doesn't take long to learn how to use one.
Cheers Errol
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  #36  
Old 13 Oct 2010
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Halfords Professional.....

Halfords Professional Mini socket set, top quality, small, compact, bullet proof and comes with a lifetime guarantee! Plus you will be able to ditch half of your standard tool kit. Supplement that with a pair of mole grips and decent puncture repair kit and you will be ready for almost anything.
The secret is not to take take useless heavy tools you will never use.
I know people who have ridden around the world using nothing more than the standard tool kit! Tools are available in most countries!!!!

Good luck
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  #37  
Old 13 Oct 2010
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Forgot to mention.....

The obvious...

WD40
Cable ties
Gaffa tape
Black electrical tape
Super glue
35mm film container of a) multi purpose grease b) swafega
Jubilee clips - various sizes
Solder
Lock wire
Araldite or similar
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  #38  
Old 13 Oct 2010
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Stainless lockwire is crucial, takes up zero space. I lost the clip on a split link fitted to the chain on my GSX-R1100 in the south of France. I wrapped a length of wire around the grove in one link pin, twisted it along its length, wrapped it around the other pin, few more twists & rode home to Oxford.

Personally I'm all for taking decent tools but only the ones applicable to the bike in question. I try to replace as many fasteners as possible with the same type to reduce the number of tools.

My girlfriend's currently in Chile on her DRZ, I made a puller for the front spindle & welded it in place. It can't be lost & reduces the size of the toolroll.
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  #39  
Old 20 Oct 2010
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For a long trip you need to carry tools for servicing and more major repairs that you can do yourself as well as tools and materials for makeshift repairs at the side of the road.

You don't need a complete socket set, just the sockets that fit your bike, usually 10,13 and 17mm suffice and 3/8 drive ratchet is heavy duty enough. Torx and allen keys can also be sockets spanners. I find a double ended ratchet ring spanner with 8, 10, 12 & 13 mm on it is very useful and lightweight.

For roadside, get you home repairs, obviously you have to carry everything you need to change and re-inflate a tube or tyre. Also carry a puncture repair kit as a back up or to repair punctured tubes when you have the time. Lockwire (and pliers) plus soft iron wire are very useful. Duct tape is multi purpose and much stronger than insulating tape which isn't very useful. Super glue (can be used as threadlock if the threads are clean) and epoxy are handy. Jubilee clips and various bits of radiator hose are good for patching burst hoses. A chain link extractor and a section of new chain with 2 split links is also a good idea although I would rely on replacing the chain before it is knackered.

For electrical repairs a bulb with two wires soldered to it for testing for bad connections and earths and a torch can easily be adapted to make a continuity tester and still serve as a torch. A selection of chocolate block screw connectors and a good length of insulated wire. Don't clutter things up with any of these if you don't understand electrics.
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  #40  
Old 31 Oct 2010
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I wouldnt bother with snap on, they're far to expensive. Cant fault the Halfords professional and advanced tools. We use them at work and never had any problems
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  #41  
Old 1 Nov 2010
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Yep don't wast money on Snap on, might look good in a big red shiny tool box, unless a bike mech you will still carry too many tools.

I would suggest you do the following get your tool role off your bike check the sizes then replace them with 1's from your tool box older 1s so if you do loose 1 or 2 don't it matter, would also suggest u take a couple adjustable spanners 10 or 12 ich I prefer to use open ended spanners, as I know the sizes i carry if not sure then a few ring spanners & metal glue of course the 2 must have are cable ties & some masking tape
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  #42  
Old 1 Nov 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pottsy View Post
bigger hammer... then yes, the REMF's would work wonders (or backload to 2nd line)!
Ha yes the good old Irish Spanner lol
I remember my 432 linkedge snapped once REME came along cut my antennae in half used that! lol worked
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  #43  
Old 2 Nov 2010
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I use Draper Tools, Sealey Tools, telescopic Ladders, Stanley tools, dewalt tools, shops in PVR Direct.co.uk for all my tools...i mostly have the draper expert sockets / spanners and pretty much every thing else. this website gives them too you half the price...cant complain at that now, can we???
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  #44  
Old 10 Dec 2012
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Smile Toolsfor RTW

Quote:
Originally Posted by ukiceman View Post
Hi Guys and Girls…

I’m planning a RTW for a couple years time, lots of saving to do so, if your life depended on it, what make tools would you carry. I know most of you will all shout SNAP ON at me. And yes, you’re all right. But what if I’m on a budget? Recon my tool money will be about £300
I have a 1200GS Adv. I only carry the tools that fit something on the bike. I have made the tool pouches out of thin silver nylon stuff, when opened & rolled out it also acts as a big"table cloth" so you don't loose things. One under the seat and the other in the pannier. Instead of a hammer I have a small axe fitted on the right side in front of the pannier. This serves as a hammer, anvil or a "Axe". I have also made two holders for 5 ltr plastic canister that slides over the rear foot pegs on both sides, one for 5 lt. water & one for 5 lt. fuel.

Last edited by mcgutt56; 10 Dec 2012 at 20:45. Reason: wrighting corrections
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  #45  
Old 10 Dec 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcgutt56 View Post
I only carry the tools that fit something on the bike.
This. Very much so.

Do your pre-trip servicing/prep with the tools you'll be taking. If you can't do something, you might need to add to your kit. If there's something in your kit that doesn't fit anything you are realistically going to fix yourself, then leave it behind.

Halfords Pro stuff is great. However the massive hundreds-of-pieces kits, unless they're on an extremely good discount, are a bit of a false economy - they will contain an enormous pile of stuff you will never use - all the stuff in imperial sizes for a start. I've bought quite a bit of Halfords Pro stuff, but most of it has been individual tools, or rails of sockets, etc. Not much of it is in my travel toolkit these days though.

After years of raiding my garage toolkit when I went away, a couple of years ago I sat down and built a proper dedicated one for the Tenere. The core of it is:

- Motion Pro spanner/tyre levers in 22 and 27mm (Tenere with a KTM front end)
- 3/8 drive adapter for the 27mm lever
- Motion Pro 'Trail tool'
- Gerber Suspension multitool (Cheap leatherman-type thing).

The Motion Pro stuff isn't cheap, but it is *really* good. They boast that with the 'Trail Tool' and a Leatherman-type multitool you can take most of your bike apart, and it's true.

I then added to that anything I found I couldn't do with the above while working on the bike. It's a surprisingly small pile - a few open-ended spanners for things like the chain adjusters, plug spanner, valve core extractor, pressure gauge, small bicycle pump, and a few other bits and bobs.

My toolkit, along with a spare front tube, fits in a Kriega US-5. I'd have a few extra spares for a long trip, but not a huge amount.
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