Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Technical, Bike forums > Equipping the Bike - what's the best gear?

Equipping the Bike - what's the best gear? Anything to do with the bikes equipment, saddlebags, etc. Questions on repairs and maintenance of the bike itself belong in the Brand Specific Tech Forums.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Giant Loop Motorcycle Saddlebags & Motorcycle Tank Bags: Panniers, Soft Luggage for Adventure & Sport Touring

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16  
Old 14 Jun 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Nantes, France
Posts: 397
Arrow

"I think the oil sold by Scott oil is expensive, so I tend to use gear oil."

It is pricey, although not extraordinarily so.

I believe that chain saw oil makes the best cheap replacement. It is very similar to scott oiler oil, both in weight and its anti-fling capacities. But whatever works for you...

Simon
__________________
Simon Kennedy
Around the world 2000-2004, on a 1993 Honda Transalp
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 14 Jun 2007
*Touring Ted*'s Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Wirral, England.
Posts: 4,383
I like the idea but as someone else posted, oiling your chain after a days ride gives you the excuse to check over the bike.

Iv had a scottoiler and I could never get the drip right. Either making a mess or not oiling enough.

They do drasitcally improve your chain life if your lazy on maintenance but not really neccessary.

Riding through dust and sand, an oily chain will ruin the chain.
__________________
www.TouringTed.com
1994 XR650L
2001 NX650 Dominator.

BMW Dealer Technician
Welder/Fabricator

Ushuaia - Colombia 2007/8
UK- South Africa 2010/11
India 2012
Yukon 2012
S.E Asia 2014
U.K - Magadan 2015
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 14 Jun 2007
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Cairo
Posts: 187
What's the viscosity of Scott oil?

I'm using the heavy oil at the moment (for hot places) and it's too thick (cos I'm currently in a cold place). I don't want to go through the hassle and expense of buying the real thing so I thought I'd go the chain oil option. Any idea of the right chainsaw oil I should use? or will it all do?

cheers
Brett
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 15 Jun 2007
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: watford england
Posts: 174
Fit and forget....

Although I think they make sense for use in your home environment, I would never use one on a trip. You get lulled in to a false sense of security and don't check the chain and sprockets. If I hadn't been lubing the chains every day I wouldn't have noticed the fact that my wifes new O-ring chain had stretched so much in one day that it had started to erode the engine casing, in the middle of Patagonia!!
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 16 Jun 2007
phoenix's Avatar
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: London / Dublin
Posts: 349
I have a dual injector Scotty on my KLR650, and i think it's great. The dual injector was a bit tricky to install (and I lost one nozzle to a sprocket bolt when reversing, on my first attempt at installation). I find that I watch the oiler and chain on a daily basis anyway, but the difference is that now, I just need to have a peek, and normally no other action is required (as oppopsed to actually having to oil on a daily basis). Every few days, I needed to top up the reservoir, which is a trivial task. If you need to re-prime the system (only required first time around, or if the reservoir runs dry) don't forget to reset the valve from "prime" afterwards though, or else the oiler will promptly dump the entire reservoir's contents all over the chain, rear wheel, and possibly the brake discs and pads! I did this (hey, I'm not perfect!), and it caused a big dirty mess that caused people to approach me to ask me if I knew that the bike had a serious oil leak!

I can understand why people doing dirt / sand routes don't use oilers.. that stands to reason.. sand + oil = nice abrasive paste.

For an O ring / X ring, oiling *is* recommended to keep the rubber o-rings soft. If the seals harden, the internal lubrication is lost, and chain life suffers. If the o-rings harden, it also causes a lot of resistance, which eats your mpg (kmpl) and your power.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 17 Jun 2007
Dodger's Avatar
Large Golden Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: BC, Canada
Posts: 1,098
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrettUAE View Post
I'm using the heavy oil at the moment (for hot places) and it's too thick (cos I'm currently in a cold place). I don't want to go through the hassle and expense of buying the real thing so I thought I'd go the chain oil option. Any idea of the right chainsaw oil I should use? or will it all do?

cheers
Brett
In Canada you can buy winter or summer grade chainsaw chain oil .
I generally use winter grade because it flows easily .
You could mix in some parrafin or diesel to thin yours out a bit and make it flow better .


Of the spray on chain lube ,I have found PJ1 to be much better than the others.
__________________
Blessed are the cracked, for they let in the light. - Spike Milligan
"When you come to a fork in the road ,take it ! When you come to a spoon in the road ,take that also ."

Last edited by Dodger; 17 Jun 2007 at 01:28. Reason: yabbadabbadoo !
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 12 Aug 2007
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Dundrum, Northern Ireland
Posts: 97
Hello Wesley

The answer is.........YES, DEFINITELY. I wouldn't have a bike without one. End of story. There is no debate to be had on this issue.

Chris
__________________


"Life is too short to drink cheap wine!"
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 12 Aug 2007
Nigel Marx's Avatar
Super Moderator
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: South Island, New Zealand
Posts: 755
No Debate?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris1200 View Post
The answer is.........YES, DEFINITELY. End of story. There is no debate to be had on this issue.

Chris
Hmmm, well I would say, by the fact that this thread is well on it's way into the second page, that there IS debate to be had on this issue. I actually would say that no, they are not worth the money, TO ME. My Loobman does a great job, some say better, some say not as good as the Scott, but at 1/4 the price.

Regards

Nigel in NZ
__________________
The mouth of a perfectly contented man is filled with . -- 2200 BC Egyptian inscription
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 13 Aug 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Langholm,Scotland,UK.
Posts: 155
Another vote for the 'Loobman' I got 30,000 miles from my 1200 Trophy chain and sprockets, using a Loobman, cost effective
Scotoilers are a good bit of kit, but way too expensive for what they are, a few pieces of rubber/plastic tubing and a plastic reservoir
Plus more to go wrong with all that plumbing, I have heard they are a PITA to bleed? But they are better than having nothing fitted, and relying on anal retentiveness

Trophymick
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 13 Aug 2007
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Bühl, Germany
Posts: 88
Scottoilers? Chains? What are those then?







(I'm surprised that no other BMW owners have posted something like that )
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 13 Aug 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Langholm,Scotland,UK.
Posts: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost Rider View Post
Scottoilers? Chains? What are those then?







(I'm surprised that no other BMW owners have posted something like that )


They are the things that make the back wheel go round and round
Instead of these oh nooooo its broken - ::. UKGS'er.com .::
and considerably less expensive in the event of a (re-occurring) seal/bearing failure The Japanese shaft drives didn't/don't seem to have many problems
Meeeeooowwww!


Trophymick
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 14 Aug 2007
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Bühl, Germany
Posts: 88
Maybe it's the lack of a Scottoiler that's causing them to break


I don't want to bring up the age old argument of chain vs. shaft, but I personally hate having to think about oiling a chain at the end of a long days ride through water and mud. If I had a chain driven bike, I would definitely fit a Scottoiler or something similar (My old BSA B40 had a primary drive with built-in total loss chain oiler - no, it didn't just leak oil, it was designed by the factory to do the job), although for sand, I know that this is not recommended.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 11 Sep 2007
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 1
Well I have two of the things, the one on my '91 Tenere works perfectly, I couldn't recommend it more highly; the one on my AT is a worst nightmare. It won't work, or works erratically and intermittently. So as I can't trust the thing I end up crawling around the ground, which is what its supposed to avoid, to see if its working and manually oiling the chain anyway...just in case.

Don't ask me!!!!!


I must say though that they are a bit Heath Robinson like!!and expensive as well.

Best excuse ever for a BM or a Deauville - only joking they are not as bad as that!!!
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 12 Sep 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Posts: 138
Hi,

We used a Scottoiler on the Vstrom for our UK to Aust trip, the first chain lubing system I have ever used on any bike I have owned, it worked a treat, highly recommended. I have never seen a loobman and didn't know they existed when I bought the Scottoiler, but if I had known probably would have given one a go and been happy - you gotta be happy with 1/4 the price.

I am sort of person that checks the bike over (quick walk around) at start of the day and at every fuel stop to check for any problems - ie anything loose, missing, broken, leaking etc. At this time I always look at the chain to see if its tentioned and properly lubed and at scottoiler to see if it needs toping up. The scottoiler is mounted where its easy to see at a glance and also easy to adjust/refill. If chain looks too dry, I simply give the flow rate a tweak up, and if quite oily and a little too much fling-off, tweak it down. Then at next stop check it again to see if its OK now. After initial set-up I have never used drops/minute, just tweak flow up or down depending on what I think it needs.

Its much harder to get the correct oils when travelling 3rd world countries, so I just used left over engine oil in scottoiler, probably not as good as scottoil/bar-oil/ gear-oil but it worked fine and no need to try to buy & carry a range of oils. Its hard enough 2-up with all your gear, no need to make it harder. I put new chain & sprockets on in Greece and we got home to Aus with same, now with over 35,000km on them. Front sprocket was quite worn but rear sprocket and chain still OK, so a few days ago I replaced the front 16t I have been running with the 17t spare I had carried all the way - gotta get some use out of it. I will be surprised if I don't get 50,000km before full replacement.

I find the oiler fling-off easier to clean up than the residue from spray-oil which usually needs lots of solvent as it seems to go solid when mixed with road muck. I often turn up the flow on the oiler when on dirt or particularly after dirt so it cleans the chain, a bit of extra fling-off, but cleans chain with no effort.

I am a convert to oilers....

Skillo
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 12 Sep 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Ripley, Derbyshire
Posts: 375
Read my review and see if a Scottoiler is for you,

F650 Ride the World - A journey of Global Proportions
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 7 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 7 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Running London Marathon to raise money for VSO CornishDeity Make a Difference 3 20 Apr 2007 15:18
Carrying money in West Africa tjvangee sub-Saharan Africa 3 4 Oct 2005 20:56
money, money, money,... jelvis Trip Paperwork 0 18 Aug 2005 02:44
Libretta - how much, and is it worth it? MattB South America 3 24 Feb 2005 16:38
Accessing money on the road Merv & Ruth Camping Equipment and all Clothing 6 25 Oct 2001 19:00

 
 



Renedian Adventures

HU DVD Summer Special!

Now that summer is here, get On the Road! Take 30% off the Achievable Dream - On the Road! 2-DVD set until August 31 only. Get On the Road! Learn the tips to staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure!

Our veteran travellers share their tips (and great stories) for staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure.

"A fantastic, informative and inspirational DVD."

"It's brilliant - thank you very much!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'ONTHEROAD' on your order when you checkout.

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:42.