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Camping Equipment and all Clothing Tents, sleeping bags, stoves etc. Riding clothing, boots, helmets, what to wear when not riding, etc.
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  #1  
Old 4 Aug 2009
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Question Looking after you kit in foul weather

Through luck rather than intent, we have camped mostly in dry conditions. Also, more recently our camping trips have been a night here, a night there, or a weekend away, so any time we get home, the tent, mats and s-bags get hung out to air and dry.

However, we are going for ten days camping in Estonia next week and I will be in Southern Sweden and Norway the week after. Rain is a distinct possibility.

So, how do you pack a wet tent?

Any differently to normal and how do you ensure that the inner does not let water in when packed against the wet outer?

As for biking and camping if you have little or no vestibule how do wet bike clothes get best treated without getting the rest soaked as well?

Thanks.
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Old 4 Aug 2009
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Maybe I'm dense, but when my tent is wet and it's raining I give it a good shake, roll it up and stuff it. The last thing I'm worried about is water migrating from outer surface to inner surface, and usually I'm in a foul mood by that time anyway and not prone to tending carefully to minor details.

Without a vestibule you're going to be sharing your sleeping space with wet clothing anyway, and the inside of your tent is going to be getting a bit soggy. And many, but not all, tents will collect condensate in damp weather, adding to the wet. Couple days of this you'll be wondering whatever possessed you to leave home in the first place.

You may note that I don't buy tents without vestibules anymore, whether for camping off my bike or otherwise. You might think about carrying a tarp to cover your tent and give a sheltered bit for wet gear.

I often elevate the hotel-to-camping ratio in wet weather. Hostels work for me, as do those cabins commonly available at campgounds in Europe.

Hope that helps.

Mark
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Old 4 Aug 2009
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I am sure things will be fine and certainly it will be a learning curve if the weather is poor - The fact is you dont seem to have the best tent for scandinavia you need to seperate sleeping and storage, however as you dont have this option I would very much consider buying a cheap nylon oversuit or jacket and pants, in the heavy rain these will keep the rest of your gear dry and the nylons can be shaken down and stored on the bike while your in the tent. As for your tent, you will just have to try to find the best way to keep it dry, if when you stop for lunch or coffee, try and get a dry time in the day and air you sleeping bag over the bike as often as you can if your staying on campsites then maybe if its really wet resort to a cheap hyter hut and dry everything that way or if your lucky some campsites have warm drying areas (The better ones in Norway) if your wild camping you really will have to work with nature and dry your gear when the wind is up and its not raining. It wont be a problem really just relax enjoy the scenery and rest a bit when the sun shines and spend an hour drying things out with a lovely view to boot.
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Old 5 Aug 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warthog View Post
...........
Any differently to normal and how do you ensure that the inner does not let water in when packed against the wet outer?............?

Thanks.
The inner will only get condensation. The outer is normally watertight if you have a tent less than 20 years old. The problem with inner touching outer, only existed when tents were 100% cotton.

First of all, get used to the fact that you can't dry anything in a moist climate.

Get a watertight bag for your tent, so it doesn't wet all your other clothes when its packed down during daytime.

If clothes get wet, change to dry when arrived in the evening and back to the wet in the morning. It isn't so bad as it sounds, as you have a lot of warmth in the body in the morning.

Be hysterical with not getting your sleeping bag wet.

If clothes are only humid, they can be dried in the sleeping bag during night but its much more comfartable to change to dry every evening.

If you are in camping grounds, clothes could be dried in a tumble drier in the campsites laundry.
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Old 5 Aug 2009
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If you haven't got a tent already consider one where the outer fly is erected before the inner it's a godsend in wet weather. That way your inner shouldn't get wet while you're fiddling with your erection. You can also just pop up the outer on its own as a rain shelter for lunch etc.

If you have got your tent already then the best you can do is pack your inner and outer seperately in bin bags or something.

I've also used a £2 mesh laundry bag like this.



I bung the damp stuff in it, bungy it somewhere with a bit of airflow and ride. It does flap, and billow and make a right racket, but it seems to get stuff dry in about 30 mins or so depending on your speed. I keep a bin bag handy to shove it in in case it comes on to rain.
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Old 5 Aug 2009
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Hmmm
Concensus so far: carry lots of bin bags and live with it!!

OK, folks. Good pointers: keep them coming!!
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Last edited by Warthog; 6 Aug 2009 at 09:40.
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Old 5 Aug 2009
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keep the wet stuff outside

may seem obvious, but just try not to bring anything wet into the tent. yep, that means a vestibule or leaving stuff in panniers, but the more water you bring in on your clothes, boots, or whatever, the more water you've got inside with you. that's to add to the condensation.

ventilate well! under-ventilating a tent will make you wet and cold. another thing to think about when you're siting and orienting your camp.

other solutions abound anyhow: under bridges, in dense fir forests, in disused (or just empty overnight) shelters for markets, construction sites etc. get inventive! heaps of fun... some suggestions:

Out for a spin: Free camping

or (they are different entries)

Out for a spin: Free camping

enjoy,
andy.
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Old 6 Aug 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warthog View Post
As for biking and camping if you have little or no vestibule how do wet bike clothes get best treated without getting the rest soaked as well?

Thanks.

Its at that point you'll be pleased that you bought a tent one size larger than you thought you needed!

Surveying the pile of soaking wet riding gear, boots, helmet etc that you dumped in the vestibule the night before - particularly if the sun is now shining and having to face the prospect of putting it back on is one of the experiences that makes me wonder how much I'd get for the bike on ebay.
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Old 6 Aug 2009
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Oh and a tarp is a good idea as you can see in THIS post, even if you do have a vestibule. In the past I've set mine up between trees and stood under it flapping tents about to shake off the water while it bucketed down, or set it up so I can get out of my rain-soaked stuff outside the tent without then getting soaking wet. The uses are endless really, but wel worth having.
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