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  #1  
Old 28 Dec 2006
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Bonneville or Scrambler

hello.
I've been visiting here, wanderlust raging...been watching the Scrambler leaning folk...I don't see it. Styling for market niche is different than real world use. a couple reasons I think the Bonneville is the better choice:
1. high pipes don't accept metal mule or any worthwhile carrying ability...while a Swiss Army knife does wonders, one really needs to carry more than that.
2. long distance requires a change of position...high pipes negate forward pegs...which in my case of horrible knees, is a luxury.
3.the high pipes make the right carb access impossible.
4. 270 firing is no answer to me when 360 is 98.5% of the question.

I just got rid of an 02 BMW RT in trade for this '07 T100. I know folks rave BMW...I didn't fall in love. too sophisticated for the boonies...too heavy...dealers suck...and I wasn't having fun changing 8 hydraulic brake circuits, and pulling it apart at 14K to see if the trans input spline was going out...only to find a weeping clutch slave...at 28K when the carbon buildup from too lean a mix became an issue, I had the last of that $17K "elite" machine. I understand the 05 dual spark fixed that issue, but I go by "fool me once, shame on you...twice, and you're fired"...bring me the liver with some fatha beans and a nice Chianti.

I did like the protection the RT offers, and the comfy...I hated the inacessability of full fairing to do any minor TB syncs ect...say a small stone gets into the throttle cable at the pulley...an impossible quick fix unless you do a tear down for a minor minor minor issue...how silly is that surrounded by cannibals at twilight with a gale approaching. travel should be pack light and live light...leave as many problems alone as possible.

"a man is rich in proportion to the things he can afford to leave alone"

here's the skid plate I just made up for the Bonneville that allows for all the up side of a Bonneville over the Scrambler.








I wanted to post here...because here is where apparently the hard core mc people lurk, and where my ideas belong.

and lastly, when you're far from the factory, wouldn't it make sense parts-wise to have a more popular model? I heard somewhere 3 out of 4 new Triumph sales are Bonnevilles. I've loved the Tiger from afar since '94 or so...even took a test ride...absolutely loved it...but it too is too sophisticated for repairs in the mud...which according to Hoyle is what's out there.

give me the simple, the fixable, the lightweight, and the workable...I'm not out to impress anymore...I just want to make it there and back safe and sound...with whatever is in my control.

when these tires wear, this will get some better dirt-ish tires.

my point is, if you're looking at a Scrambler, look again at the Bonneville.
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  #2  
Old 28 Dec 2006
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triumph tourer

Hi ,thats a good post.Been thinking of a scrambler for the future ,but i see your points.What are u doing about fuel range???like to see more photos.
well done Brian B
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  #3  
Old 29 Dec 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by outthere
What are u doing about fuel range???like to see more photos.
I was working on what I thought was a fresh idea, until I saw this posted just today somewhere...very close to what I had in mind:


they're WWII vintage English bike pannier racks someone saw on eBay...the beauty is you can strap on an attache, suitcase, spare tire, saxophone, or any odd shaped object that wouldn't fit in a store bought case...even the voluptuous metal mules...I can picture one metal mule pannier and top box and one of these on the other side with a 5 gal gerri can strapped on...which would up the 4.38 gal stock tank range to 9+ gal. that's as good as it gets...leave the stock tank alone...carry a refill.

years ago my brother did a 13,000 mile round the US trip on a R750/6 with a windjammer, home-made metal side cases and a 1 gal metal gas can.
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  #4  
Old 29 Dec 2006
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The T100 has to be the most versatile of the Bonnies , it has the powerful 360 degree engine and can be modified either way for mild off road or even for cafe racer style .
I was a little disapointed that the Bonnie Scrambler was not a bit more radical ,so if I was in the market for a bike of this type I would get the T100 which has an identical frame and forks to the Scrambler and modify it to suit myself , just as you are doing in fact .

But Scrambler , T100 or Standard it's nice to see some parrallel twins out there with Triumph badges on the tank !
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  #5  
Old 6 Jan 2007
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leany-back and rack

more experimenting:



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  #6  
Old 15 Mar 2007
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Brothers,

Love the way you're thinking with these Bonnie mods - in fact, I might be doing something similar myself.

Far as I can tell, there a couple of issues that need addressing with the Bonnie -

Pipes - too low for any water deeper than a puddle, but high pipes make luggage tricky. Solution? Dunno - maybe better heat-shields on high-pipes plus soft luggage?

Wheels - apparently dreadfully fragile and prone to rotting. The obvious solution is to lace on some saucy black Excel rims - 21'' would be better off-road, but would it mess with the geometry or snag on something I haven't spotted?

Springs - longer rear shocks are a no-brainer, but what about the front? Wonder if the front end of an old dirt bike could be used?

Any thoughts?

Suerte, Dan Walsh
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  #7  
Old 15 Mar 2007
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High pipes for Bonnies
http://www.newbonneville.com/html/shark_exhaust.htm - very sexy !
Norman Hyde High-Pipe System for the New Triumph Thruxton --- Norman-megabucks-Hyde chunky but cheerful .
Or have someone like Gazelle make up a custom system .

There is no reason that you couldn't put on a dirt bike front end , I 'm going to do that to my XS650 Yamaha , I imagine it will upset the geometry a bit .
However I will try it first . The biggest problem might be the very small dirt bike brake .So lacing 21" rim to an existing hub might be the way to go .
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Old 15 Mar 2007
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Those Sharks are gorgeous - maybe even nicer after 17 coats of black bbq paint

And maybe a 16" front sprocket...
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Last edited by Dan 23; 15 Mar 2007 at 21:50.
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  #9  
Old 15 Mar 2007
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I did another tasty comfort modification...dropped the operator's pegs 2", the shift 3 splines, and shaved a hair off the brake pedal return spring arm so the pedal can drop another bit without conflict to match the shift level.

VERY positive result is the old knees are in love again with the reduced angle ...so nice in fact the forward pegs were a luxury rather than absolute relief position yesterday after a 5 hour trial run...the increased distance between seat and pegs gives it much more of a vintage Brit dirt feel. In normal riding position, the feet can sit natural and tuck under the pedals. It's either closer to the old Triumph peg position. or my legs were shorter then. Before the peg drop the old legs just felt a bit wedged into a cafe position. The 2" drop is the single best modification yet IMO... I don't do 125mph curves, so I certainly don't need blood and guts peg positions they insist on marketing to Squids.

the mildly downside is in the sweepers you want to keep your feet on top of the pedals, but I have yet to scrape a peg...I did scrape a dangling boot in a parking lot much to my surprise.

I personally think this feet position thing is the deal clincher between Scrambler and Bonneville for any distance. if it's not comfort, then it becomes hell. Check out the skid plate above, and I'm thinking a couple 1-1/2" X 1/4" bars on end running back to the new lower pegs are enough protection for the low pipes even grinding over rocks if need be. The pipes would be visible for air cooling, but enclosed between the plate and the side rails, with reasonable bash potential.

I've been musing on a vintage tricycle looking solo seat to gently caress the hinder portions next. I don't need both feet flat at stops so I can raise the seat another inch or so to gain even more in the knees if need be...and I'm not sure the stock seat had my butt in mind to begin with.
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  #10  
Old 16 Mar 2007
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Bonny

I have thought for a while the standard bonneville would make a ideal low tech tourer It is more than capable, with a few modifications, and the right tyres. Maybe even man enough for prolonged two up touring
Interesting thread!

Is that THE Dan Walsh, of Bike Fame?

Trophymick
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  #11  
Old 16 Mar 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by modre View Post

I've been musing on a vintage tricycle looking solo seat to gently caress the hinder portions next. I don't need both feet flat at stops so I can raise the seat another inch or so to gain even more in the knees if need be...and I'm not sure the stock seat had my butt in mind to begin with.


They sell them for Enfields, nice sprung seat, a little extra shock absorber, maybe it would/could fit the Triumph


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  #12  
Old 16 Mar 2007
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Check out Aussie Dave's neat yet wide-load home-built luggage solution for the Scrambler, plus a couple of other useful mods.

DRF's new butt jewelery - Page 14 - ADVrider
(scroll down)

Suerte, Dan
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  #13  
Old 16 Mar 2007
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needed a bit of modifying but the most comfortable seat i've ever ridden on!
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  #14  
Old 17 Mar 2007
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Modre - I don't understand a word of yr posts. It's not big and it's not clever to admit, but I can barely fill the petrol tank, let alone contemplate attempting modifications to my Bonnie.

Which is why it seems to be the perfect bike for me. Simple and solid, as well as bold and beautiful (and British, which is nice too.)

Great to think another Bonnie will be out on some long roads soon.

--Mike
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  #15  
Old 6 Apr 2007
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if you're looking at a Scrambler, look again at the Bonneville.

Must say that was my conclusion too when I finally clapped eyes on the ugly Scambler - just a two-wheeled Chealsea tractor. What a lazy, missed opportunity that was.

So I am steering myself ever closer towards a new Bonnie for all the widely-agreed-on reasons: a low tech tourer with soul.

Bash plate looks neat, simple and essential but Dan, are the low pipes a problem as long as it keeps running through deep water? 4WDs manage fine with pipes at about the same, low height.

Needs alt rims as you say but I'd stick with a 19" front - better to humbly accept it's not an XT and retain the standard road manners/geometry. After all, this bloke managed alright!
http://www.mcqueenonline.com/bikerace6pic.htm
(is that a nitrous bottle behind his foot...?)

Feel the same way about raising the suspension - let the bashplate take the strain - although heavier duty all round would be a good idea. With a few functional exceptions, I plan to keep the Bonnie as it is.

Looking forward to more Bonnie Overland talk!

Chris S
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