Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Regional Forums > Northern Asia

Northern Asia Topics specific to Russia, Central Asia (also known as "the 'stans"), Mongolia, Japan and Korea
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Refreshing, funny, informative, thought provoking, honest, inspirational, infectious, budget overlanding. A handbook, a guidebook but ultimately a genuine traveller’s tale

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 21 Jun 2011
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: No fixed abode
Posts: 71
Uzbekistan: medical kits - WARNING

Apologies this is rather fierce and formal, but it’s important.

1. Don’t travel to Uzbekistan with codeine phosphate pills, and . . .

2. Don’t travel with prescription drugs without the original prescription and, ideally, a rubber-stamped letter from your doctor explaining why you need them

3. Pre-departure, check with the Uzbekistan embassy what the maximum quantity of any prescribed drug is, because on RESTRICTED DRUGS there are limits – if you exceed them, even by just one pill, you can be charged with smuggling narcotics and threatened with 10yrs jail (I kid you not)

4. Declare them on the customs form

5. The above may even apply to some over-the-counter drugs – I don’t know, but check – though standard antibiotics are fine

6. Some Paracetamol contain codeine phosphate – don’t bring them. Standard Paracetamol or Asprin are fine.


There has been much fruitful talk of the importance of declaring all your cash and electronics when entering Uzbekistan: what is not declared coming in, though is discovered on exiting, can be confiscated by customs officers. (Note: this obviously restricts any use of the black market for forex, the difference equivalent to around a third.)

The subject of medical kits, however, is even more important. What you might think as a perfectly innocent set of medicines could in fact be illegal and get you in a very, very serious pickle. So check it.

This is your responsibility, since doctor’s often don’t realise you’re taking the medicine travelling and so don’t warn you, or simply don’t know the risks of doing so. Neither does the Uzbekistan embassy or anyone else warn you.

If you have not brought along a prescription for a medicine you need and are already heading for Uzbekistan, get a friend back home to dig it out, or have a new doctor’s note written up: the precise quantity prescribed and why prescribed; signed and rubber-stamped (rubber stamps are very important in this part of the world – without one, the document is worthless). Have it scanned and emailed to you before you arrive at the border. Print it out, preferably in colour. A copy is better than nothing. If possible, have the original sent on to a place where you can collect it. DHL if necessary - it will save you money in the not-so-long run.

This is especially important with pills. For example: CODEINE PHOSPHATE. My downfall. This is a painkiller used to treat mild to moderate pain, though is more powerful than Paracetamol and is something that would be perfectly reasonable for a motorcyclist to carry in the event of an accident in a remote area. It requires a prescription to obtain in the UK and is legal, as it is in most countries.

In Uzbekistan, however, codeine phosphate is effectively illegal. They have 1-3 ranks of drug, 1 being prohibited, 2 and 3 restricted, with codeine phosphate falling into category 2. So Don’t Bring It. While you’re unlikely to find the word clearly stated even in the instruction leaflet, it contains morphine. Morphine derives from opium, as does heroin, and Uzbekistan is neighbour to the world’s largest supplier. Thus, in Uzbekistan, codeine phosphate is defined as a narcotic, regardless of how small the percentage of morphine might be.

Note: some Paracetamol contain codeine phosphate, so check them. If they contain it, I suggest you leave them behind.


CUSTOMS DECLATION FORM

If you do bring it and do not declare it in the rather fearsome-sounding box related to drugs on the customs form when entering Uzbekistan (because you assume it to be harmless) and/or don’t have a prescription and/or have over the permitted amount (apparently equivalent to 7 days worth the recommend dosage in the case of codeine phosphate, but double-check this) . . . and it’s then discovered by Uzbekistan customs, you will probably be detained in the nearest town until the issue is resolved (1-4 weeks).

This to customs is very black and white. One pill over the limit and you could be smuggling. The worse case outcome is 10 years in jail, though this is unlikely in the case of a foreigner. More likely is deportation, a stiff fine and your bike being permanently confiscated as party to the perceived crime. A major, major, boo-hoo. If you’re lucky, you may get away with a minor breach of customs regulations (though not before being threatened with jail) along with a fine, legal fees and your beloved bike returned . . . not to mention a decidedly strong and interesting experience. Which is why we travel, but anyway, let's keep to the point.

Last year a British girl was detained in Nukus (nearest city to the Xo’Jayli customs post, just over the border from Konye Urgench, Turkmenistan) for a whole month for carrying two sleeping pills over the permitted limit After going to court, she was fined and deported. Deportation means a filthy-looking stamp in your passport, which will not endear you to customs officers in any future country you visit and you will be forever haunted by the prospect of rubber gloves. At least until you get a new passport. An Italian couple suffered a similar fate just two weeks ago regarding another prescription drug.

The Uzbekistan Customs Declaration form is not a complicated form. On the first side, in addition to name etc, you detail the currencies you have, and below this are nine boxes to mark either Yes or No, including declaration of means of transport. The first relates to Weapons, ammunition, explosives, radioactive materials, and which lulls you into the wrong mindset – that everything that follows must be bad. The next is relates to Drugs, psycho tropic substances, poisonous, drastic and medicines. This is the precise wording. It is poorly worded and seems to suggest only illegal drugs. So, if you have anything on prescription, especially pills, it is advisable to ask the customs officers if you should check the Yes box. Show them your medical kit in the process and be totally open. He will probably say that you should declare it, along with providing details of the medicine in the appropriate space on the reverse side of the form – the same space in which you provide details of any electronic items you may be carrying.

That’s my understanding of it. But check everything. Take your time filling out the customs declaration form and resist the usual urge to race through things in order to be on your way and have the cool air flowing about your baking body. Be firm but patient with the customs officer if he/she is not giving you full attention. Alas, there’s also a cynical interpretation to any apparent lack of co-operation on their part, no matter how respectful your manner: that a border guard might reasonably wish for promotion back to the city and how else are they to be measured in how efficiently they’re doing their job if not catching dastardly smugglers?

Many motorcyclists, however, are waved through Uzbekistan customs without having any kit checked: as ever, it depends on the humour of customs on any given day, at any given hour, and if you travel long enough, sooner or later you meet a stinker. But you must be prepared for a full check, all kit out and scattered across the yard. Especially if crossing at the Xo’Jali post between Konye Urgench, Turkmenistan and Nukus, Uzbekistan . . . which is the post the cheery Turkmen insurance men at the Bajgiran border seem to want to direct tourists with vehicles, rather than the Dashoguz post a little further East (the latter being more convenient if heading on to Khiva). It’s the line they mark in biro on a map of Turkmenistan on the back of your insurance document which determines your route and especially your exit point.

Re. medical kits in general, I think this is a good discipline wherever you might be travelling to. Stay on top of your medical kit. Keep it simple. Keep it up to date.

Finally – if approaching Turkmenistan/Uzbekistan from Iran, beware of jinn (aka djinn or genies) in the desert between Yazd and Shahrud, because I’m sure that’s where I caught the eye of the little devil who’s been giving me merry hell at the last two borders . . . though yesterday it must have been napping, since Sariosiyo (Uzbekistan to Tajikistan) was thankfully a breeze.

Still, odd though it may sound, I’m grateful to it; for without the rough there is no smooth and oh how sweet is freedom now I have my bike once more. What has become a rather expensive bike, despite all the rattles and leaks.

Anon!

Bob
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 22 Jun 2011
Knight of the Holy Graal's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Mantova, Italy
Posts: 560
I'm astonished.

Will enter UZB early July, thanks for informing!
__________________
Nick and his 2010 Yamaha XT1200Z Super Ténéré
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 22 Jun 2011
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: No fixed abode
Posts: 71
re Uzbekistan Medical kits.

You're most welcome, Sir Knight.

I was astonished, too.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 22 Jun 2011
Contributing Member
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Bucharest
Posts: 56
Hello,
Thanks for the update and the important info

I plan to take that route next year and I'm on pills for diabetics. Do any of you know anything in this regard? Specifically I'm on Actos and Siofor, but the names might depend in each country.

Any info related to diabetics and any possible problems at the border would be much appreciated.

Thanks
Adrian
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 22 Jun 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Dreaming of travelling and riding bikes in general..
Posts: 449
This is very topical. I've just come through Krygiz and Tajik from Uzbekistan and sure enough the travellers I met in Khiva told of one of their friends who has been arrested and is awaiting sentencing in jail for codeine phosphate.

As a precaution I binned any dodgy looking tablets from my first aid kit (you can get what you need in-country by and large). We were questioned about firstaid kit in Uzbekistan and waved through Tajik border but at the Kyrgiz border they checked EVERYTHING. Down to the writing on the water purifier tablets. So it can happen.
__________________
Find out details of my 2011 trip to Siberia on a lightweight dirtbike:
www.brighton2expeditions.co.uk
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 22 Jun 2011
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: No fixed abode
Posts: 71
re pills for diabetes

I have no information for you re pills for diabetes. Sorry. Hopefully a hubber with direct experience will answer.

In the meantime, I recommend you check with the respective embassies of the countries you intend to travel through, just to be on the safe side.

And, in addition to carrying your original prescription, get an extra letter from your doctor, including your name, date of birth, explaining that you're diabetic, describing exactly the medicine you require, that it's legal in your country of domicile, along with the daily dosage your require - as precise as possible. And anything else you think relevant.

Make sure this is on doctor's letter head, signed and rubber stamped. Carry the original and make copies of it.

All the best,
Bob
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 23 Jun 2011
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 1,037
I had no idea at all, I took a fair amount of straight codiene into UZ and wasn't asked about my first aid kit at all. Was in fact one of the easiest blorder crossings ever, had a few cups of tea with them and a chat, they let me take a few photos and on I went.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 24 Jun 2011
Knight of the Holy Graal's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Mantova, Italy
Posts: 560
I just took a look to the compositions of all the medicines ready to follow me inside my motorcycle from this afternoon: no codeine phosphate detected, but found only one containing Paracetamol (it's a drug very similar to aspirine that I use in case of headache).

I hope they will not bother me for 10 pills of these...
__________________
Nick and his 2010 Yamaha XT1200Z Super Ténéré
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 24 Jun 2011
Contributing Member
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Italy
Posts: 31
Uzbekistan

Hi guys,
I crossed 3 times Uzbekistan (2007-2008-2010) and had no problem with that, exactly same thing as Henryuk
cheers
H.R.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 24 Jun 2011
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: No fixed abode
Posts: 71
re pills in Uzbekistan

Hi Honey Rider,

I think most bikers, and tourists in general, cross into Uzkekistan without any problems whatsoever. You smile broadly and everything goes smoothly. The last thing I wish to be is alarmist. It's a beautiful country with warm people.

As for potentially encountering problems at the border with prescription medicines: it can happen, and has happened, and appears to be happening more frequently. And when it does, it's time consuming and expensive.

Forewarned is forearmed, that's all.

All the very best,

Bob
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 25 Jun 2011
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Huntsville, AL USA
Posts: 115
I just crossed from Turkmen to Uzbek last nite (why do the TM's at entry tell you you have till midnite to cross, & the border post closes at 6pm?)
(this is at the Farap border)

anyhow, the UZ side was painless, very easy, nothing like entering TM. All I have in my kit is some stomach stuff (immodium) and some aspirin, still on the blister packs, nothing with any coediene or script drugs.

Should that be ok? or should I toss it in the trash?

Doug
__________________
www.motosapiens.org

My Motorcycle Hotel/Cafe in Bulgaria
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 25 Jun 2011
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: No fixed abode
Posts: 71
re acceptable pills

Hi Doug,

You shouldn't have any problem carrying standard Aspirin (as long as it doesn't contain codeine phosphate for extra oomph), or Immodium. I think the pills they look out for are certain prescription ones whose side-effects may include hallucinations.

Codeine phosphate is clear cut to the Uzbek customs men because it contains morphine. When they inspected my medical kit they picked it out immediately. They knew what they were looking for.

As mentioned in the original message, sleeping pills were an issue for an English girl a year earlier. I have also just heard of a couple of French cyclists who were recently held up for two weeks, apparently because of codeine phosphate again.

Re the rest of my medical kit, the customs men were not interested in Immodium, Senekot (constipation), Tinidazole pills (for giardia/amoebic dysentry), Doxycyline (antibiotics), or Paracetamol.

Cheers,

Bob
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 26 Jun 2011
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Denver, CO, USA
Posts: 63
Last year we crossed from Turkmenistan to Uzbekistan just North of Urgench and they were also VERY interested in our first aid kit and they did compare everything we had with some list they had. I did have codeine, not sure what kind. In the end no problems, but the first aid kit is really the only thing they took completley apart. As Luckro mentioned all the general purpose meds were not an issue. In general I think it helped I had a complete list of everything I had which I showed them righ away. I asked them what to declare from that list on their forms, so I did not forget something they could give me a hard time about later. Although thorough and time consuming in the end they were OK to deal with.

FWIW

KP
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 26 Jun 2011
Contributing Member
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: wirral
Posts: 71
bob not in jail then

Hi bob so they didn`t throw you in jail then!!!
we are in Bishkek at the moment , we got stuck in Tashkent for 10 long days waiting for paperwork to catch up with us , the info about the panjikent crossing was right we tride there first but it was closed ,when you leave tajiki if you dont have the customs form for the bike with a bit of haggling they will exept your insurance form, watch the customs coming into Kyrgyzstan mate we had to strip everthing off the bike (think they just wanted to look at our kit ) there`s a 20km plus gap between the border posts all down hill and muddy kYRGY HAS ROADS MADE OF TARMAC
zebb www.motoloco.eu (we met in Nukus)
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 26 Jun 2011
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: No fixed abode
Posts: 71
re pills in Uzbekistan

Hi there Zebb,

Glad to hear all’s well with you and Henry. Thanks for the tips.

No, they didn’t throw me in jail. But at one point it was a very real risk, incredible and surreal though that may sound.

Two weeks of tiresome meetings at Internal Affairs working through a translator way into the evening hours . . . blood and urine tests, Monty-Python-like neurological tests (Ministry of Silly Walks) and even a psychological test, though God knows how I passed the latter . . . culminated in a court appearance before a judge and public
prosecutor under a criminal charge for smuggling narcotics (for carrying 30 pills without a prescription). The same Article (Article 246, Part 1) which includes trading in arms, explosives and radioactive materials and, just for good measure, propaganda in religious extremism. I actually laughed when I got to read the translation for the first time.

The court appearance, however, ended up being a relatively civilised affair, given the judge was in a jovial mood. The charge was softened, my bike returned to me once not-too-steep a fine was paid, and I was allowed to continue my journey without deportation. Usually, once your bike is impounded you’re unlikely to get it back.

And while I value what was a strong experience, navigating your way through all of that, in a town where no trusted local lawyer speaks English (I eventually got one through a Tashkent firm), wasn't simple. Very fine lines. There was relatively little the British Embassy could do to help, other than recommend a lawyer, though I was grateful for that.

So that’s the short version. And don’t forget to cast a fog over the affair, because nothing at any stage was clear. Regardless of how innocent you think you are, or how absurd the misunderstanding might be, or how respectful your manner (though, of course, this matters) – you have technically broken the law and anything is possible.

Khpostma: you did well, my friend, to get away with the codeine. I too had an itemised list of all kit (which is an excellent idea), but events got ahead of it. Again, it’s all down to the mood of the moment. And I suspect they’re getting stricter.

Serendipity is a wonderful thing when travelling, but in these matters, the more prepared the better.

All the best,

Bob
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
First Aid Kits Bazza Staying Healthy on the Road 30 31 Dec 2013 00:11
tool kits...which tools..? jeff akins Kawasaki 15 3 Mar 2008 04:02
jack up kits WBS-UK Equipment Reviews 4 25 Sep 2006 21:32
First Aid Kits roamingyak.org 4WD Overland Tech 12 10 Oct 2003 14:21
Medical Kits with needles? richardb Staying Healthy on the Road 2 8 Jul 2003 01:12

 
 


HU DVD Summer Special!

Now that summer is here, get On the Road! Take 30% off the Achievable Dream - On the Road! 2-DVD set until August 31 only. Get On the Road! Learn the tips to staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure!

Our veteran travellers share their tips (and great stories) for staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure.

"A fantastic, informative and inspirational DVD."

"It's brilliant - thank you very much!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'ONTHEROAD' on your order when you checkout.


Renedian Adventures


Renedian Adventures

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 00:58.