Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Equipment, Travel > Camping Equipment and all Clothing

Camping Equipment and all Clothing Tents, sleeping bags, stoves etc. Riding clothing, boots, helmets, what to wear when not riding, etc.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 30 Mar 2001
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 71
The Minimalist View?

Right, the bike has been sourced with all the various hardware and add-ons, the wife convinced she wants to come on the RTW etc.

Now it comes to what kit to take? Now having traveled around Australia with only a sleeping bag and "swag" (bivvy bag) and stayed on bitumen I realise a RTW needs to be taken rather seriously, however, I want to keep the weight down for the obvious handling of the panzer (r1150gs + 2 panniers and top box).

The itinenary (sp?) is as follows, Africa (S-N)- Europe (up to North Cape) - UK - North America. Now getting to the question, is there a minimum list of essentials to take for such an adventure, ie clothing, camping & bike spares.

I realise that this question is like "how long is a piece of string?" but, it may give me some idea on what to start with and adjust the load to finally suit us.

Cheers
Macca
__________________
Macca & Lynda
Tiger955i
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 30 Mar 2001
John Ferris's Avatar
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Reno,NV,USA
Posts: 564
All the usual disclaimers and in my humble opinion. Riding suits: BMW Kalahari or Savanna, these are uninsulated with seperate Gore-Tex liners. In hot weather wear silks underneath, in cool or rainy weather put the liners in. This keeps your walking arround clothes separate from your riding gear. 1 (ONE) bag each for clothes, She gets the right side (bigger bag). Suit liners can go in the tank bag with rain gear, gloves, totes. Top box: light stuff, fleeces, hats, firstaid kit. Important no clothing overflow into bags or top box. We don't camp but if you do I would secure that gear on top of the bags with a lockable wire net. My experience is road trips up to a month. See www.geocities.com/widebmw/


[This message has been edited by John Ferris (edited 29 March 2001).]

[This message has been edited by John Ferris (edited 29 March 2001).]
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 2 Apr 2001
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Posts: 15
The question of what is a minimum requirement in terms or equipment is a perennial problem that most likely has no definitive answer. Instead I can offer some guidelines based on over 20 years personal experience (mostly trial and error!) on trips ranging from heavy and slow (Africa N-S in 12 months) to light and fast (Brisbane to Broome and back in 12 days).
Perhaps the most important things to consider are (a) what you want out of the trip and (b) your budget. If your thing is to travel slowly, comfortably, and with lots of opportunity to meet the locals then work on the “more is better” principle. My preference is “less is best” ie. less gear means less time wasted on getting unbogged / welding repairs / packing & unpacking each day and more time for enjoying the trip. How far you take this will probably be determined by one’s budget. Even on the trans-Africa leg of the trip a great deal of your kit could probably be obtained locally (or posted on) as and when required. This includes, for example, clothing and sleeping gear for the differences in climate you are likely to encounter (hot/wet to dry/v.cold) as well as wear-out parts (chain, tyres etc) for the bike.
If you favour the minimalist approach (and your budget will stretch to it) check out the specialist adventure/camping stores. I don’t worry too much about clothing from these places (T-shirts etc can be bought and thrown away on the road) but I do rely on lightweight, compact, quality gear such as sleeping bag, tent, petrol stove, and cooking gear (you will probably have to fix up most of your own food in Africa – and it’s always best to boil water before drinking it if you are unsure of its source).
A good place to start with equipment checklists is Chris Scott’s Adventure Motorcycling Handbook (Compass Star Publications). If you’ve got all your gear together and are wondering how it’s all going to fit on the bike you may wish to consider the routine I use personally to whittle it all down. First, sort all the gear into 2 piles. In the left pile put all the “essential” stuff and in the right pile put all the “maybe” stuff. Next, keep moving items from the LHS to the RHS until the pile on the RHS is twice as big as the pile on the LHS. Select ONE item only from the pile on the RHS as your personal token of indulgent luxury and throw everything else in this pile away . . . . . immediately!
Now go back to the pile of stuff on the LHS. Still too much? You really don’t need that socket set / lump hammer / spare rear tyre (?) etc. Still too much?? Take a closer look - quite often gear is duplicated . . . . try counting how many knives you have (not forgetting the Leatherman, the food preparation knife, food eating knife etc). Likewise, gear is often redundant . . . . have a look at all that white space on the back of your maps – you don’t really need that additional diary / notebook do you?
Slowly and carefully checking each item of equipment for duplication and/or redundancy may turn up some surprises. It will almost certainly indicate stuff you could jettison – preferably before you set off. If you are still having difficulty deciding what to take, or if you would like to see the checklist I use for major trips you can email me at woodi@pasminco.com.au for further info.
Best wishes for your big adventure.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 2 Apr 2001
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 71
Cheers John & Ian, I tend to mirror your philosphy Ian with "less is best" and that the way it's going to be, (having done it around Oz, no use changing now). It's a matter now of identifying the cooking equipment as I wan't even considering that, now that's minimalist

Catch you on the road.

Cheers & s
Macca
r1150gs "the Panzer"
__________________
Macca & Lynda
Tiger955i
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 18 Apr 2001
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia
Posts: 14
I also subscribe to the 'less is best' philosophy. After doing 2 trips around Oz it has surprised me on how little you actually need to get by. Obviously a RTW trip would need a little more gear then just riding around the one country....but not much. Personally I wouldn't worry too much about the 'specialist' riding gear, why bother carrying 'liners' when the one jumper or pair of track pants in your bag will do the same job. Bike boots go the same way, a pair of Military style 'GP' Boots make pretty acceptable bike boots, and are comfortable enough for those walking treks without having to carry another pair of boots/shoes. My suggestion...be frugle. A mate of mine used the ystem where he marked everything he used on a trip with a dot of white paint, yellow paint for the next trip...and so on. I think he widdled it down to a multi-colored toothbrush and a Visa Card. :-)

------------------
Stay Upright,

Andy D.
__________________
Stay Upright,

Andy D.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 20 Apr 2001
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 71
Yep Andy, I concur with your thoughts, I've just recieved Chris Scott's book on Adventure Motorcycling Handbook and going to sift through that and see what Chris reckons. I don't think my GP's are up to it anymore, but still will probably wear lace up steel-caps (done it before around OZ)



------------------
Cheers & s
Mark & Lynda
R1150GS
__________________
Macca & Lynda
Tiger955i
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 6 Jan 2002
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 943
Keep in mind that you can always send unwanted items back to yourself by parcel post - I think I mailed about 10 pounds of unwanted stuff (that I had previously thought was essential) back to myself when I was touring Europe this summer.

The price of the slowest parcel post service is usually not too high, and most post offices sell small boxes that can be used to package the items you don't want.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 6 Jan 2002
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Cairo, Egypt
Posts: 456
God it’s hard traveling with a motorcycle again after a couple of years traveling with a Jeep!!!!

------------------
A.B.
www.ShortWheelbase.com
__________________
A.B.
OasisPhoto.com – Images from the Magical Sahara.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


 
 
 

NEW! HU 2015 Motorcycle Adventure Travel Calendar is now available! Get your copy now for some terrific travel inspiration!

HUGE, 11.5 x 16.5 inches, beautifully printed in Germany on top quality stock! Photos are the winning images from over 600 entries in the 9th Annual HU Photo Contest!

Horizons Unlimited 2015 Motorcycle Adventure Travel Calendar.

"The calendar is magnificent!"

"I just wanted to say how much I'm loving the new, larger calendar!"

We share the profit with the winning photographers. YOU could be in the HU Calendar too - enter here!


HU DVD Autumn Special!

Take 40% off Road Heroes Part 1 until October 31 only!

Road Heroes features tales of adventure, joy and sheer terror by veteran travellers Peter and Kay Forwood (193 countries two-up on a Harley); Dr. Greg Frazier (5 times RTW); Tiffany Coates (RTW solo female); and Rene Cormier (University of Gravel Roads).

The first in an exciting new series, Road Heroes features tales of adventure, joy and sheer terror by veteran travellers."Inspiring and hilarious!"

"I loved watching this DVD!"

"Lots of amazing stories and even more amazing photographs, it's great fun and very inspirational."

"Wonderful entertainment!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'HEROES' on your order when you checkout.



Scottoiler automatic chain oilers. The most important accessory for your next motorcycle adventure!


Renedian Adventures


Renedian Adventures

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 13:03.