Hello and welcome to my blog.The start!

I'm Gail Baillargeon, I retired from the US Navy (EOD) on 01 April 2013 and am now embarking on a life's ambition of traveling around the world on a motorcycle. No set destinations or time schedule, just want to see the world.

My journey started in Lyndon, VT on 23 April 13 with Ushuaia, Argentina and all points in between as the first leg of the adventure. I'm riding a 2012 BMW R1200GSA with camping gear, med kit, tools and a few spare parts.

The Adventure Has Begun!

My SPOT link: http://bit.ly/GailsRTW

- End of the Line, The Traveling Wilburys

October 18, 2014 GMT
Uruguay Oct 14-18, 2014

It's been slow going since I've entered Uruguay due to thunder storms and rain showers. I've done some short day rides however the sky doesn't want to stay clear for long. Even though I've been weather bound, Uruguay is a great place to hold up.
After a night of severe thunder storms I was once again on the trail. Decided against attempting this crossing:

From Uruguay

The back roads are kept in very good conditions and after some rain it's difficult not to try tearing them up!

From Uruguay

Cattle and sheep country:

From Uruguay

From Uruguay

From Uruguay

From Uruguay

From Uruguay

From Uruguay

From Uruguay
From Uruguay

October 18, 2014:
Got an early start from Tacuarembo after having been stopped short the day before due to storms. The weather wasn't looking to promising but I was planning on riding into Argentina.

From Uruguay

Rhea, raised for feathers, skins and meat. It's native to South America however the numbers in the wild are few.

From Uruguay

From Uruguay

Seems to be the latest fashion in sheep wear:

From Uruguay

From Uruguay

Well the weather closed in on me around 1:00 pm when I arrived in Salto so I decided to lay up and cross the border tomorrow. Processing through customs when you're soaking wet is never fun. Great couple days of riding!

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 07:06 PM GMT
October 13, 2014 GMT
Brazil to Uruguay

October 11, 2014:
May last ride day in Brazil from Rio Grande to Chuy, Uruguay was a bit wet in the begining. I got break in the afternoon and it turned out to be a great day.
At a school bus stop putting in rain gear:

From Brazil to Uruguay

These Brazilian capybara are about 1/3 again largrer than the ones I saw in Venezuela.
From Brazil to Uruguay

From Brazil to Uruguay

This guy was in the middle of the road so I stopped to put him over the bank, he wasn't happy about it. I did manage to get a quick photo before chasing after him again. Turtles can be so ungrateful.
From Brazil to Uruguay

The Uruguay immigration and customs office is one kilometer inside Uruguay south of Chuy. The town of Chuy is actually on the border, Chui, Brazil and Chuy, Uruguay with the main street being the actual border line. After processing myself and the moto into Uruguay I ended up finding a place to stay on the the Brazil side of main street.
From Brazil to Uruguay

October 12, 2013:
From what I've been told, the northern part of Uruguay is the most scenic so the plan is to ride this area and then cross into Argentina.
Not the best weather for riding however it was still a great day!:

From Brazil to Uruguay

From Brazil to Uruguay

These trees reminded me of the ones in the movie, The Wizard of Oz:
From Brazil to Uruguay

Very rural area consisting mostly of small homes and cattle farms:
From Brazil to Uruguay

Lunch and weather break:
From Brazil to Uruguay

Uruguay seem to be horse country. Every pasture or paddock has a couple in it.
From Brazil to Uruguay

I stopped and visited with some people that were gathered around a few horses. It turned out that they had just completed a 90 kilometer cross country race. From what they told me these type races are very popular in this area. The average time to complete the race is about four hours. From the best I could understand it be can be quite challenging with the terrain and water crossing.
It's a bad photo however you can just make out the IV bracket mounted on the horses back. It had two bottles with lines going into each side of the horses neck, three other horses were receiving IV's as well. There were about a half dozen Vets present monitoring and checking the animals before allowing them to be transported. A Thorough Breed in the fore ground and an Arabian.
From Brazil to Uruguay

It does look like a nice place to ride:

From Brazil to Uruguay

I really enjoyed Brazil however it's nice to be in a Spanish speaking country again. I've only been in here a two days but I like Uruguay. The country side is beautiful and the people are very nice. I'm in the small village of Treinta y Tres (33, strange name for a town) today and will stay here until the weather is nicer. Uruguay is small so I won't be here long and I want to enjoy my ride.

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 08:17 PM GMT
October 09, 2014 GMT
October 08-09, 2014

October 08, 2014:
Spent the night on the Ilha de Santa Catarina (island of) in the beach village of Barra da Lagoa. It's a bit early for the beach crowds and many of the business's weren't open for the season. Finding something to eat was a bit of a challenge, ended up buying some items from a market.
Arriving Barra da Lagoa:

From October 9, 2014

While I was out looking for something to eat:

From October 9, 2014

From October 9, 2014

October 09, 2014:
After I departed the, Ilha de Santa Catarina I noticed some mountains to the west and decided to take a ride out to the area. I'm glad I did! The area around Sao Martinho and Rio Fortuna was one of the nicest places I've been. Dirt roads rambling through the hills with lots of small farms. The area has a lot of German influence and everything is well kept and clean.

From October 9, 2014

From October 9, 2014

From October 9, 2014

From October 9, 2014

From October 9, 2014

Most of the farms have a small herd of dairy cows, some sheep, pigs and a fish pond along with a saw mill.
From October 9, 2014

From October 9, 2014

From October 9, 2014

From October 9, 2014

Spending the night in Torres, found a place that has a real shower!
Entering Torres:

From October 9, 2014

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 11:45 PM GMT
October 08, 2014 GMT
Back on the coast

Ocotber 04, 2014:
Headed south to the coastal village of Paraty. It's an old fishing village that now mostly exists from tourism.
Arriving in Paraty:

From Back on the coast

From Back on the coast

From Back on the coast

From Back on the coast

From Back on the coast

Back on the road:

From Back on the coast

Lots of banana plantation in Southern Brazil:

From Back on the coast

Near the village of Eldorado:

From Back on the coast

Eldorado:

From Back on the coast

It's been a fairly uneventful time since my last blog post. Now that spring has arrived down here I'll be riding a lot more working my way south. I'm going to make a run through Uruguay and then on into Argentina.

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 09:29 PM GMT
The Interior

Departed Lencois on the 25th and headed SW to Janauba before working my way back towards the coast. This area of the interior is hot and dry with not much scenery.
Many small basic houses scattered throughout the country side:

From Brazil Interior

From Brazil Interior

Song of the Day: Ring of Fire, Johnny Cash (heard this while stopped in front of a store)

I did manage to find some good dirt roads!

From Brazil Interior

It was a bit dusty, however I had them mostly to myself!

From Brazil Interior

From Brazil Interior

From Brazil Interior

As I got closer to the coast the weather changed to overcast with scattered rain.

From Brazil Interior

From Brazil Interior

I arrived in Rio de Janeiro on the 1st of October with the plan of staying couple days and hitting the beaches. Didn't work out quite as planned, I stayed for two days however it was windy or rainy most of the time. I did manage a trip up to the famous statue during a clear period.

From Brazil Interior

From Brazil Interior

From Brazil Interior

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 09:09 PM GMT
September 25, 2014 GMT
Riding inland Brazil

September 25, 2014:
Back on the trail again! For the past two months I've been taking it easy due to an ankle injury that happened in Uyuni, Bolivia. I flopped the moto over in some sand and did a pretty descent job of spraining it. It's been slow in healing and it's been difficult getting around however, I'm doing much better now. I had attempted to see a doctor in Porto Seguro, Brazil but after six hours in a waiting room and many people ahead of me, I decided I'd live with it. I did manage to see a doctor in Itacare at the local hospital. The receptionist went outside, hollered up the hill for someone and then I waited. In about twenty minutes a guy showed up, wearing a doctors smock and those funny rubber shoes. He looked like a doctor, young, dark hair, you know the ones you see on a soap opera. I explained, well rather demonstrated what happened to me and he never said a word. He pointed to an exam room and I followed. He then motioned for me to take off my shoe and sock, he moved my ankle around some and then gave me a thumbs up. He never made a sound, hell he could have been a local surf instructor for all I know. It's strange but it I did feel better after getting the thumbs up from him.

While in Itacare I met up with Andi and Ellen, (Two Moto Kiwi's) again. They had just come from Lencois, where I was heading.
TMK's departing:

From September 25, 2014

On the way Lencois. For now, I'm a bit gun shy when it comes to sand but the road was good.

From September 25, 2014

Lencois:

From September 25, 2014

From September 25, 2014

From September 25, 2014

From September 25, 2014

From September 25, 2014

Rode a few kilometers out of town to a look out point:
From September 25, 2014

From September 25, 2014

From September 25, 2014

I met a fellow rider from Germany in Lencois and we had rode out together:

From September 25, 2014

Lencois was actually a very nice place to hold up. I wasn't able to update my blog, poor internet, and the power went out a few times but the people were there were great and I had some books to read.
Tonight I'm stain in the village of Brumado and will head south west tomorrow. This part of Brazil is very similar to parts of South Africa I've been. I'm going to slowly work my way towards Rio de Janeiro and then further south along the coast.

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 11:42 PM GMT
September 08, 2014 GMT
Continuing up the coast

September 01, 2014:

Took a short ride up the coast to the village of Arraial d' Ajuda. I was only planning on staying the night however a storm front came in so I stayed put for the week. I found a street vendor selling used books who had a good selection of ones in English.

The town is well kept and the people very friendly:

From September 7, 2014

Everyone seems particularly proud of this church:

From September 7, 2014

Behind the church there's a fence that people tie wrist band ribbons to. The bands have something to do with the peoples pride of the town I believe.

From September 7, 2014

September 06, 2014:
Some light rain but I was ready to move on so headed north for the coastal village of Itacare.

Ferry to Porto Seguro:

From September 7, 2014

Notice how quickly the sky changed:

From September 7, 2014

After a few rain stops I finally got grounded just south of Mascote. The sky was getting darker and the rain squawls more frequent.
Found a rest area with fuel, restaurant and hotel. There are many places along the roads like this and the hotels are inexpensive and nice. Many are in or near a town and seem to be a meeting place for the locals.

From my balcony:

From September 7, 2014

September 07, 2014:
The landscape in this part of Brazil is actually quite nice. Lots of hills with big trees and jungle along with lots of ponds a rivers.

Along the way to Itacare:

From September 7, 2014

From September 7, 2014

From September 7, 2014

Now this my friends, is a BOOM box! Let's get this party started!

From September 7, 2014

Itacare:

From September 7, 2014

From September 7, 2014

From September 7, 2014

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 06:30 PM GMT
September 06, 2014 GMT
Along the Brazil coast

August 26-30, 2014:

I've been continuing up the coast, visiting many of the small beach villages along the way. Not much exciting has happened in the past few days however, the weather has been great for riding, other than some rain.

Conceicao da Barro:

From August 23-31, 2014

Water stop:

From August 23-31, 2014

Song of the Day: All Summer Long, The Rock Heroes (Kidd Rock)

Housing on a banana plantation:

From August 23-31, 2014

Much of the land in this area is used for tree farming. Lots of paper mills along with their smell:

From August 23-31, 2014

Predo, a very popular beach during the summer however, not much going on this time of year. A local told me in two months the town will be full of tourists.

From August 23-31, 2014

Whale skull:

From August 23-31, 2014

Road to Ponta do Corumbau:

From August 23-31, 2014

From August 23-31, 2014

Song of the Day: Just What I Needed, The Cars

Ponta do Corumbau:

From August 23-31, 2014

From August 23-31, 2014

From August 23-31, 2014

From August 23-31, 2014

My home in Corumbau for a few days. Got held up due to rain. Not much going on here either:

From August 23-31, 2014

All is going really good! Internet has been a bit difficult sometimes and the rain is keeping my process slow but hey, I've lived without internet most of my life and I really don't need to be anywhere in particular. The people are very friendly and every time I stop someone wants to talk. When I tell them I don't speak Portuguese they look confused for a moment and then go right back to talking. It's quite fun actually.

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 11:04 PM GMT
August 24, 2014 GMT
I'm back in Brazil!

August 15, 2014:
Crossed into Brazil and worked my northeast towards the coast. The first couple days were cold and a bit rainy. Did a stop in Ribeiro Preto and changed the oil along the way. The area so far has been pretty much sugar cane fields and other agriculture. The people are friendly and It's very clean and modern.

Song of the Day: How Bizzare, OMC

Lunch stop:

From Brazil

August 20, 2014
Ouro Preto:

From Brazil

From Brazil

From Brazil

From Brazil

Song of the Day: Ramble On, Led Zeppelin

August 20, 2014:
Somewhere along the way:

From Brazil

August 24, 2014:
I'm currently in Conceicao da Barro and will stay here a few days and decide on a riding plan. I was going to ride up the coast but now I'm not so sure. The coast scenery hasn't been anything special and I'm not sure how far I want to continue up it.
Conceicao da Barro:

From Brazil

From Brazil

Life is Good!

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 06:55 PM GMT
Bolivia to Paraguay

August 03, 2014:
After a few days in Sucre it was time to head north back to Santa Cruz. While in Sucre a fellow rider told me about a dirt road from Villa Serrano to El Trigal that's part of the famous Che Guevara route. Che is still very popular in Central & South America. The route twists through valleys and mountains, the scenery was great but it was slow rough going, lots of sharp rocks.

Water stop along the Che route:

From August 03-09, 2014

From August 03-09, 2014

Along the route I stayed one night in Pucara:

From August 03-09, 2014

Not much going on in Pucara once the sun goes down:

From August 03-09, 2014

Near Samiapata:

From August 03-09, 2014

I spent a few days in Santa Cruz, obtaining a Visa for Paraguay and that's where I realized I had over stayed my, Temporary Import Permit (TIP) for the moto. I was told I could extend it however, this has to be done before it expires. Not good. I wasn't sure what the fine or penalty was but one local rider told me they can confiscate the moto and the fine for getting it back, is the value of the moto. Change of plans. I was going to head east into Brazil however I wanted to find a more remote and maybe a bit less controlled border to exit Bolivia. Plan, head south to Villamonte and then east into Paraguay. From what I could find out, the immigration and customs offices for both Bolivia and Paraguay are a few miles apart.

August 08, 2014:
Headed south and spent the night in Villamonte and the next morning I headed for Paraguay. The first obstacle was getting past a military control point. They checked my passport and then the TIP, never noticing the expired date. Luckily the man in charge was training a younger soldier and I don't think the younger guy knew what he was looking at. They did a search of the bags, looking mostly for marijuana, a couple photos with the moto and then was told to proceed two hundred meters to Immigration.

From August 03-09, 2014

Immigration is in there somewhere:

From August 03-09, 2014

There it is:

From August 03-09, 2014

Sometimes Immigration will ask to see the moto permit but this guy didn't . Passport stamped, Salida, so far so good.

Next obstacle, customs. It was a about a 40 minute ride to the customs office for Bolivia and the one for Paraguay. A Bolivia agent asked for my TIP and instantly noticed the expired date. I had a couple good stories lined up depending on which way it went but the first plan was to shut up and act like everything was fine. Another agent was consulted and then I was told to wait. After about 20 minutes one of the agents asked if I had gotten my exit stamp in my passport. Yes. Another few minutes of waiting and then I was asked if I planned on returning to Bolivia, Me, no. Agent, are you sure? Me, no never, I'm riding around the world and will not return. Agent, ok leave, don't come back. Both agents were actually very good about the whole thing and wished me a good journey.

The Paraguay Customs office was within walking distance and everything went fine. He wanted a copy of my TIP with exit stamp from Bolivia before he would do the Paraguay TIP but when I told him I didn't have one he proceeded without it. Someone had shot a couple deer, very small deer, and they were dressing them out behind the office and he wanted to get back to it. They wouldn't let me take any photos.
The Paraguay Immigration office is in Mariscal Jose Felix Estigarribia, a good six hour or more ride, and was told I had a day or two to get my passport entry stamp, all is good!

Paraguay:

From August 03-09, 2014

Didn't spend much time or do much of anything in Paraguay. There's not much along the Trans Chaco and the city of Asuncion is nice but I didn't see much to hang around for. Heading for Brazil.

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 06:01 PM GMT
July 28, 2014 GMT
Salar de Uyuni

July 26, 2014:
Against the advice of some local riders at the BMW dealership, I departed Santa Cruz and rode west to Cochabamba and then south to Uyuni to visit the salt flats. I was told it's going to be very cold and windy and that it would be better to visit later in the year. Well they were correct, the closer I got to Uyuni the colder it got and the wind got stronger. It was pretty much survival riding from Oruro to Uyuni. When I arrived in Uyuni on the 25th there was a sand storm going through and the village of Uyuni was not visible until I entered it. It was brutally cold.
I found a place to stay easy enough and then went out for some dinner. I put on every piece cold weather clothing I had and was still freezing. People in the restaurants were dressed like they were on an expedition to the South Pole. People were eating with gloves on. It was a long cold night.
The next morning it was clear sunny day with little wind so I headed out to the flats. At 08:00 when I started the moto it was 19 deg F but felt a lot warmer than it was in the room.
I rode out to the flats, 14 miles from town, and quickly realized I hadn't calculated how large an area they covered. Distances a very deceiving here and I figured I should get more gas and a good meal, so I headed back into town. While in town I met up with an Italian guy, Stefano, on a Yamaha 250 doing a RTW journey. We filled up on food and fuel and headed out.

From July 26, 2014

From July 26, 2014

Stefano running the flats:

From July 26, 2014

We found a spot were someone had chopped through the salt to expose the water.

From July 26, 2014

I dropped a piece of salt in an watched it sink about a meter and half before disappearing:

From July 26, 2014

From July 26, 2014

From July 26, 2014

Cactus Island: A tourist stop with a restaurant, small store and a few buildings that people can sleep in.

From July 26, 2014

A bit of celebration:

From July 26, 2014

It was 4:30 when I decided to head back to town. All total, I rode 148 miles on the flats. It was really a lot of fun!

After another brutally cold night I decided to head east to warmer weather. A quick stop at the famous train cemetery south of town and then onto Sucre.

From July 26, 2014

Somewhere north of Potosi:

From July 26, 2014

There are a few more places I would like to visit in SE Bolivia but not during this time of year. Middle of the Andes in the middle of winter is not the best combination.
I'm in Sucre now and will start riding my way east to Brazil and Paraguay in a day or two.

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 10:54 PM GMT
July 19, 2014 GMT
La Paz to Santa Cruz via Trinidad

July 11, 2014:
The TMK's and myself departed La Paz on the 11th headed back to the "Death Road" in hopes of better weather. Didn't work out that way but it was a good ride just the same.

From July 18, 2014

From July 18, 2014

We decided to ride together up Ruta 3 to Trinidad and then down into Santa Cruz. It was great meeting up with Andi & Ellen again and heading into the Amazon region sounded like a good break from the cold and altitude. It was a six day ride, an extra day in Trinidad, mostly due to rough roads and construction delays however it was a great run!

The three of us agreed that the section of road from Coroico to Caranavi is the new "Death Road". The road was narrow, muddy and it was every man, woman and child for themselves.

From July 18, 2014

We managed to squeeze through even though he wasn't going to give us an inch.

From July 18, 2014

A bit of a delay:

From July 18, 2014

From July 18, 2014

From July 18, 2014

Lunch break:

From July 18, 2014

Somewhere along the route:

From July 18, 2014

Once in the basin things dried out some and it was quite nice:

From July 18, 2014

From July 18, 2014

From July 18, 2014

Couple ferry crossings just before entering Trinidad:

From July 18, 2014

From July 18, 2014

From July 18, 2014

From July 18, 2014

July 18. 2014:
Andi & Ellen headed for Paraguay this morning and I'll be heading west in a day or two to see more of Bolivia before going there myself.
Good times!

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 12:48 AM GMT
July 18, 2014 GMT
July 06 & 09, 2014

July 06, 2014:
Spent a couple days in La Paz and then headed for Coroico to ride the famous "Death Road". There really isn't much of the original road in use now and what there is used by tourists, mostly for a mountain bike run.

From July 06, 2014

From July 06, 2014

From July 06, 2014

From July 06, 2014

It's a short ride, an hour or more along the dirt section to Coroico. Views from my hotel room:

From July 06, 2014

From July 06, 2014

One of the main street in Coroico:

From July 06, 2014

There were a lot of mountain bikers along the Death Road so I planned on getting up early the next morning and riding it again however it was raining so I just hung out. On the 8th I was packed up and riding out of town when I was stopped by a couple riders I had met on the boat crossing from Panama to Colombia, Andi & Ellen, Two Moto Kiwis. I checked back in to the hotel and we spent the day catching up.

July 09, 2014:
Headed out to ride the Death Road in hopes of good weather however it didn't work out so well.
Departing Coroico:

From July 06, 2014

Weather wasn't cooperating so we rode into La Paz to wait it out.

From July 06, 2014

Getting an internet connection or a reliable connection has been difficult to find. Even in La Paz things haven't worked well.

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 11:52 PM GMT
July 04, 2014 GMT
Onward to Bolivia!

July 01, 2014:
Rode to the Bolivian village of Cocacabana just over the border on the south end of Lake TIticaca. Checking out of Peru was quick and clearing the moto and myself into Bolivia was easy, not much going on. The border personnel see quite a few motos coming through and were friendly and efficient.
Along the road to Bolivia:

From July 4, 2014

From July 4, 2014

July 02, 2014:
I'd heard from other travelers that Cocacabana which is located on the south shore of the lake is a nice place to hang out for a day. It's a tourist stop over spot however it's a nice village:
On the north side of town there's a hill, Cerro Calvario that has great views of the town and lake. It's only 400' elevation climb however you start at 12,650'.

From July 4, 2014

It's truly amazing how big Lake Titicaca really is.

From July 4, 2014

Some religious shrines at the top, there was also some along the trail and people were stopping at each one to say a prayer:

From July 4, 2014

July 03, 2014:
Headed into La Paz. It's cold here and along with the wind, the ride into the city was, burrrr. Didn't take many photos.
Cocacabana is located on a peninsula separated from the main part of Bolivia.
Ferry in Tiquina:

From July 4, 2014

From July 4, 2014

July 04, 2014:
Independence Day!
Decided to stay in La Paz for a day and watch some world cup. Heading out now to watch Brazil vs Colombia.

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 08:53 PM GMT
June 30, 2014 GMT
Around Puno

June 28, 2014:
Saturday, market day:

From June 30, 2014

These moto-tricycles are the main taxis in most villages:

From June 30, 2014

These two came running out of their produce stand all excited asking me to take their photo. Once I showed it to them on the camera the both demanded money from me. They went from cute to scammers very quickly:

From June 30, 2014

From June 30, 2014

Most of the people, especially the women don't appreciate having their picture taken so I had to be as quick about it as I could:

From June 30, 2014

Plaza de Armas, city center. Every village & city in Peru I've visited names the center, Plaza de Armas:

From June 30, 2014

Took a boat trip out to the floating islands where the Uros people have lived for centuries. Visiting the islands was on the "Bucket List". When I was young I watched an episode of "The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau" The Legend of Lake Titicaca, where him and his crew dove the lake and visited these islands. It's been on the list a long time.
The Uros supposedly started living in this manner centuries ago in order to isolate themselves from the aggressive Collas and Incas. There are 85 floating islands with four to six families on each. Tourism is their sole source of income and really existence now. It was still really interesting, they pretty much live the same way.
Meaning of Titicaca, Titi - Puma and caca - grey or stone.

They build this type of boat for the tourists. I heard a couple locals call them, Mercedes Benz:

From June 30, 2014

From June 30, 2014

Typical island:

From June 30, 2014

From June 30, 2014

Every island has a small tower on it that is used for commenting, either yelling and having it passed on or waving something. Not sure how much they use this system though, despite trying to keep them discrete, I saw cell phones.

From June 30, 2014

The islands are anchored so as to keep from drifting off however they do sometimes move the island depending on water depth. Each week the inhabitants need to add more reeds as the lower layer decays:

From June 30, 2014

From June 30, 2014

A traditional style boat that many islanders still use.

From June 30, 2014

From June 30, 2014

From June 30, 2014

From June 30, 2014

From June 30, 2014

A few of the islands have wooden structures on them.

From June 30, 2014

The Yavari, the ship was built in England and then shipped in 2,766 pieces to Lake Titicaca for the Peruvian Navy. It was hauled over the Andes by mule, taking six years, and then reassembled and launched in 1870. It's now a museum.

From June 30, 2014

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 08:25 PM GMT
June 27, 2014 GMT
Lake Titicaca

June 26, 2014:
It's a short ride from Putina to Puno so I decided to take short detour to the Northeast corner of Lake Titicaca. It was a great day and there was very little traffic. Amazing views!

From June 27, 2014

From June 27, 2014

From

From June 27, 2014

From June 27, 2014

From June 27, 2014

June 27, 2014


I'm gong to hang out in Puno a few days and plan out my strategy for the first few days in Bolivia. I initially intended on spending more time in Peru however, I'm at the border now.

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 09:10 PM GMT
La Rinconada June 25, 2014

June 25, 2014:
One of the items on my "Bucket List" was to visit the town of La Rinconada. I don't remember when or how I learned about this place but it's on the list. The town was built and exists because of the gold mining in the area. It's supposedly the highest permanently inhabited town in the world. Depending on the source of information the towns altitude is from 16,700' to over 17,700'.
I spent the night in Putina and the ride up to La Rinconada was only 45 miles. The road is paved most of the way to Ananea and from there to La Rinconada, 12 miles, it's good dirt road.

La Rinconada in the distance:

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

Entering the village of Ananea:

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

A mile or so from La Rinconada, trash everywhere and it's starting to smell bad:

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

Welcome :)

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

The town has NO, garbage, potable water or sewage systems. In recent years the growth has increased so rapidly that most housing and shops are these tin sheds. (I don't know how I got the snow effect in the photo, it just happened when I went to attach it??)

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

Most of the streets are steep and in very bad condition:

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

City center, I was told there was another center however I didn't want to ride the moto through the streets to get there:

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

The people seemed very skeptical of me and weren't very friendly. I don't think they get many tourist here and I don't think they want them either. When I took my camera out I heard people mention it and many went inside the shops or turned away.

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

This is why I didn't ride around the place. Many of the streets were just open waste water pits or they were just thick mud from the waste water.

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

There are a few permanent buildings, I saw a couple hotels. I was told that when you check in they supply you with a bucket:

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

Miners:

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

I didn't have my GPS with me, however my SPOT has my highest point at 16'122'. It's amazing how much trash is here and how bad the living conditions are: Between the altitude and the stench it was very difficult to breath:

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

Aside from this town and the mining, it's a beautiful place:

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

I didn't ask however I got the feeling no one was interested in taking a photo of me so here's a self:

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

I liked this place, second story with balcony. Not much of a view though. I didn't see any Real Estate signs so I figure new construction is probably your best option:

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

Just outside of Ananea on the way to La Rinconada there's a check point and you're required to show ID and vehicle documentation to proceed any further, I didn't have any of it. Left everything in the hotel room in Putina. I explained everything to one of the guards and he wasn't sure what to do. Finally he said if I bought him a big bottle of Sprite in La Rinconada for him I could enter. It wasn't a problem to go back and get the documents but soda is cheap and it was a good trade.
When I returned with the Sprite he wanted me to take a photo of him and his partner with the moto:

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

Heading back to Putina:

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

I've seen a few of these shrines throughout Peru, normally near or at a pass. People stop to give an offering usually alcohol or a food item and maybe light a candle. The only issue is the areas become a trash pile of empty bottles and containers.

From La Rinconada June 25, 2014

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 08:32 PM GMT
June 23-24, 2014

June 23, 2014:
The days plan was to ride to the Canyon del Colca, second deepest canyon in the world and home to some Andian Condors.

The pass before descending into the village of Chivay, 16,018':

From June 23-24, 2014

From June 23-24, 2014

Chivay in the valley:

From June 23-24, 2014

On the road form Chivay to Colca:

From June 23-24, 2014

From June 23-24, 2014

From June 23-24, 2014

From June 23-24, 2014

Canyon del Colca and the Condor lookout point:

From June 23-24, 2014

From June 23-24, 2014

Condors feeding:
From June 23-24, 2014

From June 23-24, 2014

Rode back to Chivay and got settled in. This is a view from my window of the volcano Ampato coughing:

From June 23-24, 2014

June 24, 2014:
Chivay to Putina:
Riding back over the pass I noticed volcano Ampato was still coughing:

From June 23-24, 2014

Stopped for breakfast and to warm up and a view of Mt. El Misti

From June 23-24, 2014

From June 23-24, 2014

From June 23-24, 2014

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 07:17 PM GMT
Cusco, Nazca, Lima, Arequipa

June 15, 2014:
Departed Cusco on the 14th and rode back to Abancay for the evening. Woke up early on the 15th and headed for Nazca. Around ten miles out of Abancay the road started to climb up to a height of above 14,000' and staying there for 140 miles with a couple points above 14, 900'. It was cold and desolate.
There had been a recent dusting of snow:

From June 15-21, 2014

Just a few small adobe villages along the way:

From June 15-21, 2014

It was cold and barren, however it's a beautiful ride:

From June 15-21, 2014

From June 15-21, 2014

From June 15-21, 2014

Descending out of the high plains towards the desert coast:

From June 15-21, 2014

From June 15-21, 2014

June 16, 2014:
The ride to Lima was pretty boring and dismal really. It was a grey overcast day with a lot of wet fog. The road is good however the scenery leaves much to be desired, it's desert, trash and trash fires. Lima is a mad house on on motorcycle however it didn't take long to find the dealership and get settled.

June 20, 2014:
Took a bit more time to get everything done with the moto however all is good. It felt good to get on the road and head out of Lima. Departed the hotel just before day break to get ahead of the traffic. All along the highway heading south out of the city there were trash fires, some next to bus stops. It seemed strange after all the beautiful clean villages I've seen in the mountains.

Near the village of Ica there's the small oasis village of Huacachina. It's a popular place for playing in the sand dunes, lots of sand boarding. I stopped for lunch and then was on my way back to Nazca:

From June 15-21, 2014

From June 15-21, 2014

June 21, 2014:
Plan, ride to Arequipa, 347 miles. It started out as a very grey overcast day, not much visibility. Just south of Nazca the road follows the coast down to the village of Camana. The temperature was in the mid 50's however with the cold wind coming off the ocean, it was a very cold ride.

Around 1pm the sun poked through a couple times:

From June 15-21, 2014

From June 15-21, 2014

From June 15-21, 2014

A late lunch just before Camana. Grey sky coming back in:

From June 15-21, 2014

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 06:45 PM GMT
June 14, 2014 GMT
Back to Cusco

June 13, 2014:
The ride back to Cusco was fun despite the overcast weather. Traffic was light and I was pleasantly surprised how few animals there were this time.

From June 12, 2014

It really wasn't that steep:

From June 12, 2014

When I arrived in Cusco many of the streets were blocked or closed due to dance parades. During the month of June there's some sort of celebration everyday. Something to do with the Inkas and the sun, best I could figure out

From June 12, 2014

From June 12, 2014

June 14, 2014:
I'm now back in Abanacay for the night, I'm working my way towards Lima to get the moto serviced and put some new hiking shoes on her.

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 11:00 PM GMT
Machu Picchu

June 12, 2014:
Woke up early in Santa Teresa and took a minibus to Hidroelectrica where I caught a train to Aguas Calientes, (Machu Picchu Peublo) :30 min ride. It was a bit cloudy but it looked to be a good day.

Train to AC:

From June 12, 2014

The main plaza in AC, from here I took a bus up to MP:

From June 12, 2014

Song of the Day: Feel so Close, Calvin Harris (heard while having coffee in AC)

From June 12, 2014

From June 12, 2014

From June 12, 2014

From June 12, 2014

From June 12, 2014

From June 12, 2014

From June 12, 2014

From June 12, 2014

Back in AC catching the train back to Santa Teresa:

From June 12, 2014

From June 12, 2014

A very good day! :)

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 10:30 PM GMT
Cusco to Santa Teresa

June 11, 2014
One of the bests rides I've done! The road runs through the Sacred Valley to Phiri and then north into the mountains over the Malaga pass to Santa Maria. It's good paved road from Cusco to Santa Maria however it's slow going due to animals and curves. From Santa Maria to Santa Teresa (14 miles) its good dirt with a couple easy water crossings, just a bit dusty.

Sacred Valley, descending into Pisac:

From June 11, 2014

Song of the Day: Wild Ones, Flo Rida (stopped for fuel in Pisac and heard this playing)

From June 11, 2014

From June 11, 2014

Climbing out of Phiri to Malaga Pass:

From June 11, 2014

Just over the pass:

From June 11, 2014

Road from Santa Maria to Santa Teresa:

From June 11, 2014

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 10:01 PM GMT
June 13, 2014 GMT
Onward to Cusco

June 08, 2014, Ayacucho to Andauaylas

Very nice paved road, going is slow due to curves and obstacles however it's a great ride. Road runs along the top of the Andes and the altitude keeps around 13,500'+.
Lunch break:

From June 10, 2014

Incredible views:

From June 10, 2014

I wonder if there's anything around this corner?:

From June 10, 2014

Yup, another rock:

From June 10, 2014

From June 10, 2014

June 09, 2014, Andahualyas to Abancay, 104 miles:
The road is paved about half way and then it turned to dirt, dust and rocks, three hours of it, however, more amazing views!

From June 10, 2014

From June 10, 2014

From June 10, 2014

Abancay in the distance, an hour and a half more:

From June 10, 2014

From June 10, 2014


June 10, 2014:
Great ride from Abancay to Cuscos, twisty mountain road and only one construction stop.
GPS started mapping, road climbing out of Abancay:

From June 10, 2014

From June 10, 2014

From June 10, 2014

Lunch stop:

From June 10, 2014

Song of the Day: Sussudio, Phil Collins (this played while I was eating lunch)

Arriving Cusco, Plaza de Armas:

From June 10, 2014

From June 10, 2014

From June 10, 2014

When I first saw Cusco I was a bit concerned about navigating and finding a place to stay however it went great. Asked directions to the Plaza de Armas twice and then a policeman directed me to a Hostal with parking. Within 15-20 minutes I was settled.
Wondered around the plaza and found a pub, Norton's Rat, motorcycle themed place and hung out there. It's tourist central however, I met a lot of fun people. Life is Good!

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 11:48 PM GMT
June 08, 2014 GMT
Concepcion to Ayacucho

Jun 06, 2014:
The road from Concepcion to Ayacucho is paved for most the way, narrow mountain side road with lots of sharp corners. Luckily traffic was fairly light and even though the going was slow it was a great ride.

Another cable box crossing:

From June 6, 2014

I liked the mock piece of ordnance, nice touch:

From June 6, 2014

From June 6, 2014

From June 6, 2014

A Toyata truck can get through keeping all tires on pavement, but anything bigger is hanging on the edge. Most spots were even narrower and the corners sharper, it just wasn't safe to stop and take a photo.

From June 6, 2014

I did hit a construction area and had to wait an hour and then the road turned to dust and sharp rocks. Traffic had backed up and when we got moving again I got dusted out. By the time I reached Ayacucho it was 5pm and I was filthy.
The village of Ayacucho is beautiful and the people are very friendly. Got settled in fairly quickly near the town center and then went out to find Mamma Mia Pizza. The guy was right, cold beer and good pizza, very nice place.

June 07,2014:
Decided to take the day off from riding and do some domestic chores. I sent the cloths out to laundry and then washed my riding gear, helmet to boots. Hadn't done that since Venezuela, things were bad.

Ayacucho is a great place to stop if you're ever riding through. The plan now, ride to Andahuaylas tomorrow and then onto Cusco the next day. Everyone I've talked to here has recommended it.

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 12:40 AM GMT
June 07, 2014 GMT
Lunahuana to Concepcion

June 05, 2014:
Woke up to a beautiful day and got an early start on 22 to back to Concepcion.

I had seen this coffee stand yesterday and planned on stopping here this morning if it was open, it was. The owner recommended his organic coffee with a squeeze of lime, very good! He was a pretty interesting fellow, had traveled a lot in Peru and had lived in Brazil for five years. I told him my planned route for the next few days and he recommended a pizza restaurant in Ayacucho that's a must, Mamma Mia Pizza.

From June 5, 2014

The walk bridge looked safe enough I guess, but the climb up the cliff didn't look good at all.

From June 5, 2014

From June 5, 2014

From June 5, 2014

Much of the road was posted at 3.2 meters wide. I heeled to toe it at one spot and it was just over ten boot lengths from cliff to ledge. Full buses and tractor trailers run this thing.

From June 5, 2014

Mining cave:

From June 5, 2014

Got the bright idea of putting on a headlamp and hiking into this one, first two steps and I was six inches deep in fowl smelling mud. Ok, bad idea.

From June 5, 2014

Stopped for a drink of water and met this guy, he's got small farm with parts on both sides of the river:

From June 5, 2014

That's his house, lived there most of his life:

From June 5, 2014

His cable box to get across the river:

From June 5, 2014

He told me he has a rope in the house that he uses to throw and snag the box.

From June 5, 2014

He asked a lot of questions about my moto and then insisted I look at his and take a photo. A Chinese made 125, he was sure proud of that moto, good on him.

From June 5, 2014

Stopped here just to get a gallon of "that feels better" gas.

From June 5, 2014

The woman had come out of one of the buildings and was very friendly and even joked that I looked like a spaceman. I asked if she had 90 octane, she did and started pouring from a big plastic jug into the gallon metal can. I noticed the gas seemed very dark in color and I asked if it was 90, the 90 I have seen was either light green or clear. As soon I a mentioned the color she got a bit testy with me. You want 90, I sell you 90, I have many tourist buy my gas, I guarantee my gas. She was actually quite upset and I had to apologize many times to get her to shut up. When the guy was pouring the gas in he told me that 90 comes in about four different colors depending on the company. He seemed to be afraid of the old woman and didn't speak very loud. Once the woman calmed down she was back to being her friendly self and was smiling and wanted to visit.

From June 5, 2014

I asked about this building and man told me they had dug into the ledge and then built the face. Not sure how deep or big the inside is.

From June 5, 2014

One of the few towns along the way:

From June 5, 2014

From June 5, 2014

Getting near the summit:

From June 5, 2014

These things are everywhere however they seem to be quite shy and get out of the way quickly: I haven't asked yet, but I believe the ribbon/yarn in the ears is identify ownership:

From June 5, 2014

Farm:

From June 5, 2014

There are lots of these stone structures scattered throughout the landscape, some have make shift roofs. I stopped and spoke with this woman and she said they are wind breaks and used when eating or just waiting for someone. Her husband was out with his horse doing something and would be back in a few hours. She pointed out some of the locations of the houses and were many of their animals would be.

From June 5, 2014

The people in Peru are very friendly and hospitable. They enjoy visiting and having their pictures taken and always wish me a safe and happy journey.

From June 5, 2014

From June 5, 2014

From June 5, 2014

The views in this country are amazing:

From June 5, 2014

I've been playing with the GoPro some and was able to upload a short clip on youtubeof some cows and getting caught up in their heat of passion. The GoPro is a work in progress, it's a bit challenging taking a movie when you're not looking through a lens.

YouTube: Peru cattle (I forgot to copy the link once it was downloaded)

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 11:41 PM GMT
June 06, 2014 GMT
June 04, 2014

June 03, 2014:
It was a short ride day, didn't sleep good in La Oroya due to the elevation, 12,500' and I was also quite dehydrated. I rode to the Village of Concepcion which is at 10,500' (couple k makes a big difference) and spent the day resting and rehydrating.

June 04, 2014:
Ah that's better! Felt great and headed west along road 22 or 24, (GPS listed each at different times, no listing on map) towards Tomas with Lunahuana as my destination. I was told by a few Peruvians this is a great run on a motorcycle, good road, rivers, lakes and small villages. It was a little heck tick getting through Huancayo but once on 22 it was back to animals and light traffic.

From June 4, 2014

Lots of interesting side trails and roads to follow out:

From June 4, 2014

House under construction. What I found interesting was the size of the mud blocks and the fact that some had been made in place while some had been made and then placed. No one was around to ask how they placed the blocks.

From June 4, 2014

Looking back at the road climbing up towards the pass:

From June 4, 2014

A few of the lakes at higher altitudes were utilized as trout farms:

From June 4, 2014

These things were about the size of a Lesser Canadians. The eggs seem to be just starting to hatch as most birds were still sitting and I only saw a few goslings. Not sure what type of bird it is.

From June 4, 2014

The pass is at an altitude of 15,570:

From June 4, 2014

Canyon just south of Tomas:

From June 4, 2014

From June 4, 2014

From June 4, 2014

It's a great ride and will go on the "must do if your ever in Peru" ride list. I had gotten a bit of a late start and didn't spend as much time exploring as I'd wanted. Arrived in Lunhuana just after 4pm, that's about as late as I like to ride.

Great ride day!

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 01:14 AM GMT
June 03, 2014 GMT
Tarma to La Oroya

June 02, 2014:
Departed Tarma and rode north to Lake Junin, the lake is at 13,400' and supposedly has flamingos living there.
Stopped along the way for breakfast:

From June 2, 2014

Song of the Day: Winchester Cathedral, The New Vaudeville Band
(Heard a traffic policeman in Tarma whistling this)

Lake Junin:

From June 2, 2014

There they are:

From June 2, 2014

Rode into La Oroya and then west towards Lima to the Toclio Pass:

From June 2, 2014

This is supposedly the highest paved road in the world:

From June 2, 2014

The map list the altitude as 15,793':

From June 2, 2014

There are pigs running loose everywhere in Peru:

From June 2, 2014

Saw a trail leading up into the hills so I took it:

From June 2, 2014

From June 2, 2014

This is the highest I've ever been on land:

From June 2, 2014

From June 2, 2014

Rode back into La Oroya and found a place to stay. It's amazing that people live at these altitudes. It's cold all the time here and the houses don't have heat.

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 03:09 AM GMT
Villa Rica to Tarma

June 1, 2014:
Decided to make it an easy ride day and ride to Oxapamapa, a Greman Village and then decide from there. The weather was great and the road was good.
Along the rode to Oxapamapa there are a few bridges for pedestrians and motos to use when the water is high or you just don't want to go through the water. I went through.

From June 1, 2014

From June 1, 2014

Oxapampa:

From June 1, 2014

There was a mountain bike race happening and I arrived for the start. It's a nice village however it was early and I just felt like riding.

From June 1, 2014

Water stop:

From June 1, 2014

Decided to head into Tarma for the night;

From June 1, 2014

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 02:26 AM GMT
Pucallpa to Villa Rica

June 31, 2014:
Decided I'd ride back to Von Humboldt (one hour) and then ride south through the jungle to Villa Rica. Looked good on the map and I'd been told it's a good road, pavement dirt mix. I hadn't seen much wildlife since I entered the Amazonia here and was hoping to see some birds and a maybe a few monkeys. Got some breakfast in Von Humboldt and headed south. The road was good and cutting straight through the jungle.

Water stop:

From May 31, 2014

There is power lines however I was told the electric it comes from a generator and not often. I didn't see any power lines along the road.

From May 31, 2014

From May 31, 2014


Six and half hours into the ride, 1:00 pm the road started getting worse, all dirt, washouts and mud. Then I came to this at 1:24 pm. When I arrived I was the only one and then two guys on a small moto showed up shortly after. We all looked at the ditch and then they asked me to help get their moto through. It took the three of us but it went fairly good. It's was way more challenging than the pictures show. We got the moto through:

From May 31, 2014

Once we took a break they said, ok, let's get yours through now. No way, it's not going to make it. The moto is to long to make the corner on the path and the incline coming out is way to steep. If it falls over it's going to be upside down in the water. The older guy asked if I wanted to turn around or keep going, I was more than half way and after this the road would be good. Some how they convinced me. I took off the bags and down in the ditch we went. Once in the bottom it was apparent that maybe it wasn't such a good idea. The ground was giving way and the back tire slide into the ditch. I could barely reach the handle bars and keep the clutch, the ground was giving way under my feet. Some how those two guys got the back wheel back on the path and we got the moto pointed straight up the bank, no joke, 50 deg,. incline for ten feet. The older guy was in the rear ready to push and the young one in front pulling, I was hanging of the handlebars loosing footing. The older guy said, ok when I say go, you go and don't stop. It was magic, that big beast came out of there like a rocket. It spun some but somehow the rear tire grabbed and took us out of there.
Getting the bags across. In the photo it doesn't look that bad, I wish I had a photo of us in the middle, it was challenging.

From May 31, 2014

After a few hand shacks, pats on the back we drank the last of my water and finished packing up. I asked why someone had not fixed it or at least made a diversion around it. The older guy then said, there is a way around it, back up the road there is a turn to the left that goes around this and comes out one kilometer further down. I started laughing and they looked at me like I was crazy. How long does it take to go around, I asked? About 20 minutes. I took us about 30 minutes to get two motos and gear across.
They told me I had five more hours to ride.

From May 31, 2014

Looking down what we came up:

From May 31, 2014

Song of the Day: Dirty Work, Steely Dan (not sure why this song came into my head)

The road was ok, however it didn't look like it was going to be good.
Climbing back into the jungle mountains. The road was mostly mud with lots of small brook crossings:

From May 31, 2014

The water crossing got wider and deeper as I went along. Lots of round river rocks. Met this guy half way through one crossing, luckily he stopped me and told me it was to deep for me to go the way he did and to go up river and take the bridge:

From May 31, 2014

The bridge:

From May 31, 2014

Stopped and walked in for three meters and everything looked good. First gear and went for it. I dropped into the main part and the cylinders went under and the exhaust was gurgling. The bottom was good however and other than flooded boots I was fine. For a couple seconds I thought I was going to flood the intake.

From May 31, 2014

Went through this and the guy in the truck told me the worst was over. Just a few more crossing and some mud holes but all would be good.

From May 31, 2014

Good they're building a bridge however I would have chosen a couple other places to start building:

From May 31, 2014

I still had a lot of riding to do in order to make it to Villa Rica before dark. My ass was whooped.

Great riding day!

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 01:58 AM GMT
Huanuco to Pucallpa

May 30, 2014:
Departed Huanuco for Pucallpa on the 29th however I rode as far as Tingo Maria and decided I'd call it an early day rather than arrive late. The ride out was a bit overcast once I passed over the mountain and started dropping into the Amazon region. It rained some but it was a nice ride all the same

Settled in for the night in Tingo:

From May 30 2014

The 30th looked much better weather wise and I took my time riding to Pucallpa.

Typical jungle home:

From May 30 2014

The road was pretty good with exception of a few washouts, sometimes becoming one lane:

From May 30 2014

Small village:

From May 30 2014

Where ever there was a construction stop, there was women selling something to eat and drink:

From May 30 2014

The women always seem to enjoy flirting. The one on the right joked that she wanted to have a gringo baby. When I asked what her husband would think about that, she said she didn't like him so it's ok.

From May 30 2014

Tourist spot ahead, some small waterfalls:

From May 30 2014

Another photo secession:

From May 30 2014

I'd been seeing log trucks and sheets of wood and then came across a mill that was producing the sheets. They use a giant lath to peel off sheets about 1/3 in. thick.

From May 30 2014

From May 30 2014

If it really needs to be cut, use a Stihl:

From May 30 2014

It was interesting how they centered the log in the lath with a forklift to get the most out of it.

From May 30 2014

From May 30 2014

Arriving in Pucallpa, Rio Pucallpa: People running up to me from every direction wanting to load me onto a boat and take me somewhere. Competition is fierce on the rivers for cargo and a gringo on a moto is prime cargo. It doesn't take long before word spreads that I don't need passage and I'm left alone.

From May 30 2014

From May 30 2014

This port services the villages for 125 miles up and down the river from what I was told. One guy told me they take some passengers and cargo up river to connecting boats that reach the Amazon River.

From May 30 2014

Everyone is interested in the moto and my story and they always ask before sitting on the moto. Amazing how many parents show up with their kids.

From May 30 2014

Relaxing with a beer:

From May 30 2014

Posted by Gail Baillargeon at 12:45 AM GMT
 
 

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Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!

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Editors note: We accept no responsibility for any of the above information in any way whatsoever. You are reminded to do your own research. Any commentary is strictly a personal opinion of the person supplying the information and is not to be construed as an endorsement of any kind.

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