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Yamaha Tech Originally the Yamaha XT600 Tech Forum, due to demand it now includes all Yamaha's technical / mechanical / repair / preparation questions.
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  #46  
Old 15 Sep 2011
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I brought mine in to get new tires mounted for Tunisia (Tourance -> TKC80) and got a call a few minutes ago that after only 4.500kms my rear rubber shock absorbers (pic) are completely gone and need to get replaced. I knew they were a weak point but less than 5k seems a bit weak, doesn't it? Anyone else had that problem before?
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  #47  
Old 15 Sep 2011
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Hi, i had to replace them at 8K miles on my first XT660Z. My current XT660Z has covered 11K and they are fine. i see from your photo that the replacements are red (non Yamaha i assume), are these better than the originals. Andy
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  #48  
Old 15 Sep 2011
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Those aren't mine, I just took a random picture for those who don't know what they are

8,000 miles is ok but 4,500 kms / 2,600 miles? Seems ridiculous. I'm getting mine replaced on warranty (bike's not even a year old) so they'll be the original ones for sure. Which means that after Tunisia I'll need new ones again. At that pace I'll work through three more sets before I'm out of warranty
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  #49  
Old 15 Sep 2011
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The recognised quick and easy (and free!) fix for this problem is to pack them out with old inner tubes; makes them good as new and only takes a few minutes. I agree though, they shouldn't wear as fast as they do; but for an otherwise damn fine bike, it is a minor and easily remedied issue.
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  #50  
Old 15 Sep 2011
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I'm aware of that bodge and will certainly "fix" it that way once I'm out of warranty. It simply surprised me that it happened so fast. I wasn't expecting it for at least another 5,000 km.
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  #51  
Old 15 Sep 2011
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Hello mj. Have you had any problems with your regulator/rectifier? Mine seems fine, but I am tempted to do one of the "fixes" before the big trip just in case.
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  #52  
Old 15 Sep 2011
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A Jap bike with a reg/rect problem? I used to replace all my Ducati ones with Jap ones - where do Italian bike owners go if the Jap ones are blowing up??
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  #53  
Old 15 Sep 2011
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Haven't had any problems yet.
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  #54  
Old 15 Sep 2011
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ive had both 2008 tenere and i have a 34l tenere currently,the newer bike sits on motorways without a drama,has good tank range,good fuel consumption,is comfortable and does as well as can be expected off road given its weight,front suspension is a little on soft side and im only 11 stone or so..my one was completly reliable in time i had it,some of fasteners could have bin better finished but thats the nature of most bikes now..
its not an enduro bike but is probably more capable as a trail bike than most of people that ride them..
im pretty new to a 34l tenere but its probably more capable off road than any modern bike of this type despite crude forks and a tank that stops you getting forward to corner correctly,its comfortable,has huge tank range but a little limited in its motorway cruising speed..
it can do anything the newer bikes can and some things it even a bit better at,id rather take one of these somewhere a bit snotty than some of newer generation of 200kg monsters..but its still no enduro bike,but probably the nicer for it...
the only downside is if you cant spanner a bit and have to pay someone elso to it may not be a cheap bike,potentialy costing a fair way towards something newer,i was lucky with mine the rims were not rot under rim tapes but con rod was shagged,3rd gear noisy,and had an issue with oil system..
no matter how much electronic shit and crap and rider aids the newer bikes have its never gonna change the fact they are a 200kg bike thats going to take a huge amount of effort when the going gets grim..
i think certain brands maybe trying to brain wash people that you need abs,traction control,electronic stuff to adjust your suspension and so on..
if i had the spare cash i would have another newer model 660 tenere without hesitation....
right im off to change a leaking clutch cover gasket on a 34l!!!!!
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  #55  
Old 28 Nov 2011
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Just reviewing your XT660Z experiences and opinions for the book and I think we've all managed to convince ourselves that the new Tenere is as good as ever, all things considered.

On release I think they pitched it just right: cheap enough to attract the majority who just wanted the AM-look (like the bloke I bought mine off @ 400 miles). While for us the minority who actually do what they show in the advertising, it [was] a bargain platform to build up an overlander, with lots of ways to lose weight and height, add poke and so on, if you want that.

Crazy rrp now alas (because it's made in Italy? that may account for some issues, too), but for what it cost when it came out we imported XR650L dinosaurs nearly ten years ago.

I think the only reason this thread sinks among all the air-cooled chat, is that they're all constantly asking for help to keep their ancient Teneres running, same as any bike of that era. New one's not perfect, neither were the 600s. But out of the shop it needs a lot less doing to it than most for a big trip - that's why we like them.

Chris

Last edited by Chris Scott; 28 Nov 2011 at 13:26.
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  #56  
Old 28 Nov 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysr6 View Post
Hi, i will take a wild guess that Dick didn't like his Tenere, well i love mine. i am now on my second xt660z and have covered 16K including about 2K off road in 23 different countries. i will try and give a honest assessment of the bike and reply to Dick's points.
  • Bulid quality; nuts & bolts are poor and also cush drive rubbers, i did have to change them at 8K. Engine, suspension, brakes, frame etc are very good and very reliable. Some early bikes did have some problems but is that not the norm for any new model of bike / car.
  • Too Heavy; yes it is heavy but it is also very strong, the sub frame is steel and alone weights about 1/2 a ton but i have not heard of any breaking can BMW or KTM say that. this is not a light weight enduro bike but i am willing to accept weight if it means greater reliablity.
  • Too tall; yes, i fit a lowering kit.
  • Twin disks; brakes can never be too good.
  • Screen; will give you buffeting and noise, take it off for instant cure.
  • Dull Engine; what do you expect from 45bhp, it gives a top speed of 115mph, will cruise all day at 90mph and cruising at 65mph can return over 60mpg. i like it.
  • No Charisma; obviously a personnel choice and you can guess my view. Andy
It would be interesting to hear how much height can be lost, easily, from this bike, preferably by lowering the suspension rather than cutting the seat down until it is a plank.
(Yam say that the standard height is 895mm).
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  #57  
Old 28 Nov 2011
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lowering kit

Hi, the Metalmule lowering kit drops the back about 25mm allowing most people to get the both feet on the ground (maybe not totally flat down). Cheers Andy
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  #58  
Old 29 Nov 2011
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Originally Posted by Andysr6 View Post
Hi, the Metalmule lowering kit drops the back about 25mm allowing most people to get the both feet on the ground (maybe not totally flat down). Cheers Andy
Hmmm, thanks for that 25mm info Andy, but I would need at least 3" = 75mm off the 895mm seat height.
Preferably more, like a seat height of about 800mm.

Does anyone know of a way of doing this?
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  #59  
Old 29 Nov 2011
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You can also get a lower seat from OFF-THE-ROAD | Seat modification XT-660 Z | buy online which will also drop the height by 25mm (not cheap though). Only another 25mm to go and you're there. Platform boots? Have you tried sitting on one? It's not as bad as the spec sheet says.
Great bike, by the way.
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  #60  
Old 30 Nov 2011
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2009 model, did 15000 km during summer from Norway to UB Mongolia and then through Thailand etc to Jakarta.

Bike never missed a beat even allowing for being dropped and asked to run on 80 ron fuel. Mods included Ohlins front and back and the other standard stuff like bash plate, heated grips etc.

Doing a trip, I can certainly say it did everything that I needed with capacity to spare.

I have just over 31 000 km now and have no intention to sell.

Chris
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