Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Technical, Bike forums > Yamaha Tech

Yamaha Tech Originally the Yamaha XT600 Tech Forum, due to demand it now includes all Yamaha's technical / mechanical / repair / preparation questions.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Calendar Contest Voting is now CLOSED. Results to be posted shortly.


Like Tree2Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16  
Old 11 Mar 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: North Lakes - UK
Posts: 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick View Post
But anyway, it's all bollix 'cause state of mind is all that matters for adventurous travel and any bike will do, ,


Gotta agree with your closing line.....

Tim - I don't think you'll find one. As Yamaha (1200 Ten?), Triumph and BMW have shown they now cater for the 'big boys and toys', expensive bikes that tick lots of boxes. I think the current 660 Tenere is probably the last of the new old school bikes. By that I mean the 2011 660 Tenere has an ABS option in the UK, next year my guess is that it will be only an ABS option. Bike manufacturers are being pushed into developing stuff that fits with regulations, regulations that are plain stupid in places (think of the CAT in a bike - Heavy, costly and no real benefit, heck it's not even tested in the UK!)

To be great at something you have to be crap at another, the current Tenere sit's in the middle, and is good at everything (commute, road, distance, rough, trails, globtrotting, reliability), but great at nothing (there are bettter commuters, better tourers, better trials etc), as I've said.

I'm repeating myself here, suns out, works sucks so a couple of hours reminding myself why I work seams a good start to the day

Last edited by GasUp; 11 Mar 2011 at 09:36.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 11 Mar 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Denmark
Posts: 1,003
In this world, in theese times, the tenere would have been a total failure if it was build just the way people wanted it. You would end up with a bmw pricetag, and the bike would suit less people.

The yamaha xt series has allways been about a lot of bike, in a cheap package. I know people love their old bikes, because they have soul. But spec wise they arent better, evento many of us try to tell ourselves just that.

Some loose things I noticed...

Complaint about no power at 3000rpm, that goes the same for a 640 lc4.

Plastic not-so-fantastic tenere.... yeah sure, but try crashing your old tenere at see what that cost ya, thoose gastankas arent cheap are they

Early bike problems, that goes for the early xt600 series aswell, the oilpump was upgraded 2 times, and other things were fixed due to running too hot.

The old tenere's and even the never xt600e's have bad suspension aswell, with little or no adjustement.

If you really want a lighter "tenere", how about buing the "x" or "r" model, and build to you're needs?

I wuld love a xt660 in a lc4 frame, but I sure as hell wouldn't pay for it, im too cheap. The people that really want that stuff, the make it themselves, or shoehorn som better suspension on the bike, and put it on a diet.

Its nice to hear both sides of the story, but if ones world is so coluoured that he makes his own realyty, what could other people possible benefit from that?
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 11 Mar 2011
steved1969's Avatar
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Yorkshire UK
Posts: 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by GasUp View Post
I'm repeating myself here, suns out, works sucks so a couple of hours reminding myself why I work seams a good start to the day
Hah - Sunshine in the Lake District, who are you trying to kid
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 11 Mar 2011
wuming's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: london
Posts: 255
Thanks for all the replies so far.
BruceP: my current bike is a Peg Trail. I love it to bits, but have had a few electrical issues recently which make me wary of it as a RTW bike; also the smallish tank. Great engine though IMO. I am basically after a Peg Trail with a longer range and better more reliable electrics. The Ten seems to fit that description? JMo's heavily modified / upgraded Ten is up for sale. Very tempting. Anybody got £7000 they can lend me?? I'll pay it back.................eventually!
Keep the opinions on the Ten coming. Cheers.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 11 Mar 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: North Lakes - UK
Posts: 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by steved1969 View Post
Hah - Sunshine in the Lake District, who are you trying to kid
or - Usually.....

But today


or, as we say up here, if it's not raining - it's going to!
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 11 Mar 2011
*Touring Ted*'s Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Wirral, England.
Posts: 4,284
If Yamaha built the new Tenere just how WE would like it, it would be slammed down by the biking press and most of its owners for being overpriced and too dedicated.

The reality is, the people who buy these bikes very rarely do any real overland travel on it. They like it to "look" overland and for to do okay on a farmers track when they go camping at the weekend and be well behaved and reliable for some biking holidays.... That's the real market !!

Make it more hardcore and capable for hardcore over landing and it just wouldn't sell because it would be too expensive.

Like Dick says, it would be a dream if they released different versions with better suspension, lighter components etc but again, it's too expensive because only about 10 people would buy it. The REAL overland market is still far too small...

In the motorcycle industry, if you want a a bike to ride off-road you buy a dirt bike, if you want a bike to go road touring on, you buy one of those !

I think the 660 Tenere is a good bike and probably the closest thing to an "out of the crate" overland bike there is at the moment.. You can't have it all in one package !!
__________________
www.TouringTed.com
1994 XR650L
2001 NX650 Dominator.

BMW Dealer Technician
Welder/Fabricator

Ushuaia - Colombia 2007/8
UK- South Africa 2010/11
India 2012
Yukon 2012
South America 2014
U.K - Magadan 2015
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 11 Mar 2011
wuming's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: london
Posts: 255
As Touring Ted and Tim Cullis say: "out the crate" it is as close as there is for a RTW bike, so less work to do to get it set up as I would ideally like. The 660 engine is as much power as I need for my purposes and I am used to and like that particular engine. Leaning more towards buying one, but still time to be dissuaded or persuaded. Cheers.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 16 Mar 2011
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: England
Posts: 5
I’m glad I stumbled across this thread. I’m soon going to be shelling out for an xt660z. I flogged my TT600 last year and the time has come to go and get myself another trailie. Large tank, fairing and single cylinder are my only main criteria. I was a bit spooked when the new Tenere came out as top of the ‘off-the-shelf’ choices. I was kinda hoping a KTM Adventure would have sneaked onto the list – but they’re all big, lardy twins these days like the beemers and most other trailies now they’ve rebranded themselves as ‘adventure sports’ bikes – something that used to be scribed on the sides of 90’s 650 Africa Twins. So no 640 Adventure, but a 660 Tenere. Dicks first reply was, I thought, a truthful but fairly harsh assessment of the bike and pleasing to see someone who’d actually owned one come up with a list containing most of the question marks I’d had myself over the new Tenere. But I’ve got to say, his criticism has only made me more confident that it’s the bike for me.
(1) Low build quality – definitely, but then so is just about everything you buy these days and I didn’t expect anything more, and (2), made from cheese – that doesn’t surprise me either. (3) Low quality spenders – I’d be replacing them anyway. (4) Zero charisma? Nah, when I bought my original back in ’89 people didn't think it was charismatic - but now they would? (5) Too heavy – yeah but hopefully solid – and anyway being lighter would mean even more cost. Also I’ll probably ditch the front-end and standard exhausts, which should help. (6) Too tall – doesn’t really bother me. (7) Twin discs – Yep, didn’t like that but will probably change the front-end. (8) Heavy wheels – see above, + I’d whack on Excel rims, heavy duty spokes and maybe an 18inch rear. (9) Electric issues – This was one that really concerned me, but it does seem to be an issue on some early bikes, so hopefully if I get a 2010 or newer bike it won’t be a prob. Definitely my number-one concern though. (10) Cush drive issues – Weird one. Shouldn’t happen, but does, although there are bodges to sort it. And I do like a bit of bodging. (11) Buffeting – not really an issue and easily sorted with some more bodging and gaffa tape. (12) Don’t want a centre stand and will fit my own brushguards once I’ve fitted whatever bars I decide on. (13) Daft exhaust – Agreed, but now design happens on computers we’ve gotta accept crap like this. I’ll change ‘em and get rid of the heavy cat anyway. (14) Dull engine – It’s a 600 single and I’m after reliable plodder with good mpg anyway.
I am still tempted by getting another 3AJ. I rode one across Africa 20 years ago, came home and despatched it around London, racking up over 90,000 miles. But as much as an old git as I am, I do think a new Tenere is worth a punt as it does seem to be the best “out of the crate” RTW bike. A few mods and it should be spot-on, I just hope the electrical issues were just a problem with a few early machines. Just like when digital cameras first came out and I thought it weren’t a real photo unless it was shot on film, I’ll have to get over it and stop thinking it ain’t a real Tenere unless it’s an air-cooled single.
I’ll bloody well resist a sat-nav though. Paper maps that get wet and torn in the wind. Suits you sir.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 16 Mar 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 258
recalls

Hey Folks,

I've an '08 model and am currently rebuilding/modding/sorting out ready for a trip, my question is does anyone know what mods have been done to correct the issues from the original 2008 model to the newer models, nothing seems to be advertised as such. I've checked out XT660.com but no luck with no definate answers
I'd like to, if possible upgrade what dilemmas there were on my bike with the newer mods.

Any ideas will be appreciated.
__________________
Geoffshing

'Security is a product of one's own imagination, it does not exist in nature as a rule, life is either a daring adventure or nothing.'
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 16 Mar 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: North Lakes - UK
Posts: 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by geoffshing View Post
does anyone know what mods have been done to correct the issues from the original 2008 model to the newer models,


It's all there on XT660....

in a nutshell,

Regulator; This wasn't so much a fault as an assebly error. There is a new loom with an improved connector, but the difference is very subtle. unplugg your regulator from the connector, it should look like new inside, if not replace both to be safe. When you reconnect it together take the normal precautions you take for waterproofing a bike for a trip and seal the connector with grease/water inhibitor. Make sure it's put back together right, the problem has been that it wasn't put together rigt, and wasn't picked up at PDI

Oil Breather; there is a new expansion box on the engine. Mos tpeople have had it replaced under warrenty. My 2008 bike is fine, and I don't mind the breather pipe filling up, it always looks worse than it really is.

Cush Rubbers - nothing, no upgrade, change, but you can pack them with inner tube to increase life.

Wiring Harness; these were a little tight on the early bikes. just make sure the cable ties are slackened off a little to stop it rubbing against the frame and it will be fine.

The rear spring will sag after 20,000 miles - a new Hyperpro progressive spring will cost about £80 and will improve the bike. Change the front and it's a new bike all together.

Other than that......
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 16 Mar 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 736
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neil67 View Post
But as much as an old git as I am, I do think a new Tenere is worth a punt as it does seem to be the best “out of the crate” RTW bike. A few mods and it should be spot-on, I just hope the electrical issues were just a problem with a few early machines. Just like when digital cameras first came out and I thought it weren’t a real photo unless it was shot on film, I’ll have to get over it and stop thinking it ain’t a real Tenere unless it’s an air-cooled single.
I’ll bloody well resist a sat-nav though. Paper maps that get wet and torn in the wind. Suits you sir.
Hey Neil,

Good to hear that you are going to give it a try. Great looking bike, no doubt you'll have a blast, I almost convinced myself to bid on one based in the UK this spring.

Not to be be too picky about the details, but I think the description of the bike in this thread has morphed from Tim's original description as out of the crate "off road tourer" to Ted's description as out of the crate "overland bike" to Wuming's description as a out of the crate "RTW bike".

To me at least, there's a big difference between off road tourer and overland or RTW bike.

For off road touring, there are a lot of bikes that fall into that category and it all depends on you and your intended ride as to which is the best fit. I tend to think they are small to medium sized, but that is personal preference.

For RTW, there are even more bikes that can be used for that purpose as not only are there off-road orientated dual sports but also more road orientated dual sports, among many others. Again it all depends on you and your intended ride which is the best fit. I tend to think that these are medium to large sized bikes, but again that is personal preference.

The world is changing and roads are improving every year. With the paving of the transiberian highway last year you can now ride east-west completely around the world without having to leave pavement.

Out of the crate readiness is good, but almost all of the bikes I've seen are modified in very personalized ways so how any bike comes already might save you some time and money in set up, or it may not.

Anyways, at one point I thought that there would be a bike that would be the best or ideal but I have since come to the conclusion that there are too many individual preferences and riding destinations to have just one. In each class or category, there are at least three or four bikes that are perfectly acceptable and only each rider can weigh the pros and cons to find the best fit for them.

Have fun on the bike and let us know how it compares to your previous bikes.

P.S. Totally agree that paper maps are more fun and better to see the whole layout. GPS can be good though to find direct routes in big cities to important places like pubs so they can be useful to have as a backup
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 17 Mar 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 258

The rear spring will sag after 20,000 miles - a new Hyperpro progressive spring will cost about £80 and will improve the bike. Change the front and it's a new bike all together.

Cheers mate!
I do have a sagging spring... it sucks and was going to get an Ohlins but here's a question....Can I simply swap the spring on the original shock with a Hyperpro..? Does the original allow to come off and if so..how?

Much appreciated!
__________________
Geoffshing

'Security is a product of one's own imagination, it does not exist in nature as a rule, life is either a daring adventure or nothing.'
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 17 Mar 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: North Lakes - UK
Posts: 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by geoffshing View Post
was going to get an Ohlins but here's a question....Can I simply swap the spring on the original shock with a Hyperpro..? Does the original allow to come off and if so..how?
It's a direct replacement, take the shock off, compress the spring and remove the locking plates at the bottom. Then compress the new spring, put it onto the shock and replace the lockng plates, un-compress the spring.

It takes longer to get the shock assembly out and back in than it does to swap the spring. I would use ths as a good opportunity to service the linkages too. Some bikes have found a real lack of grease down there.

The main problems with this bike aren't down to cheap components (on the whole) but slapdash assembly. The Regulator is down to assembly, the wiring loom rubbing is assembly....... And, althought he rear sags, you won't notice until you replace it, and it's only 15mm maybe.

So a good PDI/Service before you go is a must, but then it should be on any bike you are going to venture far away from home on!

IF, you go for the front Hyperpro's (and it's cheaper to by a front & rear kit, than buy front then rear) you get full setup instructions, new oil the lot... and it makes a huge difference to the bike, it sits higher and it's almost impossible to get it to bottom out. The front upgrade also improves the front end grip as you would expect. Under some conditions, the front wheel can wash out on slippery dirt, but with the HyperPro front end upgrade it's much more stable and focussed.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 17 Mar 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 258
Done

Amazon is a great thing...LOL! Spring compressors for less than £9.00 And a Spring kit ordered from Calsports. They'll be delivered in a few days. I'm stuck in the Middle East so there's no rush!

Thanks!
__________________
Geoffshing

'Security is a product of one's own imagination, it does not exist in nature as a rule, life is either a daring adventure or nothing.'
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 18 Mar 2011
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: England
Posts: 5
Mountain man,

I see what you're saying, but I didn't even notice that the original description of 'outta da box' had morphed into different things. I guess from my angle I'm with the 'off-road tourer' description. Sure you can ride RTW on anything, but from my point of view I do enjoy a bit of off-road that takes me somewhere quiet. So from that point of view I reckon with a few mods the new Tenere will be right up my street. Err, I mean piste.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 22 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 22 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Wanted: top case for Yamaha XT660Z Tenere (2008), Belgium or vicinity Effix TRAVEL Equipment for Sale / Wanted 0 27 Nov 2009 16:07
Wanted: Yamaha XT660Z Tenere 2008 Jami TRAVEL Bikes for Sale / Wanted 0 15 Jan 2009 09:23
2008 Yahama xt660z Tenere (pimped out) ATWR Which Bike? 2 19 Aug 2008 17:22
Rear Rack for 3AJ Tenere & XT660Z Tenere SAME? GeoffE Yamaha Tech 2 23 Oct 2003 16:38

 
 



HU DVD Spring Special!

Buy the Achievable Dream Collectors Set and get Road Heroes Part 1 FREE!

Achievable Dream - The Whole Enchilada!

Cooped up indoors in crap weather? Binge watch over 20 hours of inspiring, informative and entertaining stories and tips from 150 travellers! Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to order them both and use Coupon Code 'BoxSet+' on your order when you checkout.


What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders


contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!




New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.



Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!






All times are GMT +1. The time now is 16:45.