Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Technical, Bike forums > Yamaha Tech

Yamaha Tech Originally the Yamaha XT600 Tech Forum, due to demand it now includes all Yamaha's technical / mechanical / repair / preparation questions.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11 May 2007
bikerfromsark's Avatar
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 201
Tubeless rims to rims?

Hey
After getting four flats in one day I have had enough of my tubeless rims! (and tubeless tyres) I understand that new rims are expensive. So I was thinking of machining off the 'lip' that makes getting the tyre off so dammed hard! Has anyone tryed this? one method, maybe a tad crude would be to fit the wheel with no tyre on it back on the bike, with the bike in first gear proped up and file/grind it off! Any opions on my idea would be great.
Cheers George
(I am sure it does't matter but it is a TT600RE (04) )
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11 May 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: sunny England
Posts: 789
forgive my ignorance but shouldnt a TT600 have tubes in the tyres?
__________________
dave
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11 May 2007
*Touring Ted*'s Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Wirral, England.
Posts: 4,420
Having tubed tyres doesnt really make it any easier.

The lip your talking about is mostly there to hold the tyre bead. Tubed or tubless.

Repairing or replacing an inner tube is far less of a hassal though.
__________________
www.TouringTed.com
1994 XR650L
2001 NX650 Dominator.

BMW Dealer Technician
Welder/Fabricator

Ushuaia - Colombia 2007/8
UK- South Africa 2010/11
India 2012
Yukon 2012
S.E Asia 2014
U.K - Magadan 2015
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11 May 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 998
It's much easier to fix a tubless flat than one with an inner tube.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12 May 2007
Mr. Ron's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Vancouver, BC, for now...
Posts: 798
Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by bikerfromsark View Post
Hey
After getting four flats in one day I have had enough of my tubeless rims! (and tubeless tyres) I understand that new rims are expensive. So I was thinking of machining off the 'lip' that makes getting the tyre off so dammed hard! Has anyone tryed this? one method, maybe a tad crude would be to fit the wheel with no tyre on it back on the bike, with the bike in first gear proped up and file/grind it off! Any opions on my idea would be great.
Cheers George
(I am sure it does't matter but it is a TT600RE (04) )
Just to clarify, are you running tubes in your tubeless tires? As far as shaving down the safety bead, well i guess it would depend on the rim and it's structure. But before you do something drastic like altering the rim, do you use soap or grease when you change or remove your tires? Using a lubricant makes a HUGE difference in getting tires on and off the rims. It also helps pop the bead with tubeless. I also carry a wire brush to scrum the rubber from the rim. This helps too. Personally, i prefer tubeless. It's really easy to plug a tire on the road, and if done properly should last for the life of the tire.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12 May 2007
bikerfromsark's Avatar
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 201
Hey
I am running tubes in my tube less. But I will soon be on regular tyres. Because of the 'safety lip' it is very difficult to get the tyre into the center of the wheel to remove and refit the tyre. Looking at it, removing this bead of metal, to make the rim like a normal rim, and hence alot easyer to remove.
Cheers George
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 14 May 2007
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: watford england
Posts: 174
TT600RE's should have tube tyres, standard fitment is pirelli MT70 90/90 21" front, 130/70 18" rear. I have never had a problem changing tubes with 200mm tyre levers. Changing tyres can be awkward but perseverence pays.
Are you sure you are pushing the bead in to the well on the opposite side of the wheel, if not it can be bloody hard to get the tyre back on the rim.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 15 May 2007
bikerfromsark's Avatar
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 201
Hi Leigh
What I am finding is that the lip on the edge before the center/well of the wheel makes it very hard to get the tyre into the center. I have been told a normal rim does not have this lump, hence making it alot easyer to get the tyre into the center and off/on. The little black bump ilistrated in my terriable drawing of a cross section of my rim is what I am thinking of removing, because I am told a regular/non safety rim does not have this. My question is, is doing so going to weaked the rim?
Or am I gravely mistaken and there is nothing wrong with my rim!
Cheers again for all your help.
George

Last edited by bikerfromsark; 26 Jan 2009 at 20:27.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 16 May 2007
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: watford england
Posts: 174
Assuming your rim is standard fitment the same as my 2 TTRE's, there is nothing wrong with it. Just practice, a warm tyre is easier, kneeling on the tyre should push it in to the well easier. Consult the puncture repair diagrams in the Adventure Motorcycling Handbook for nice pictures.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 16 May 2007
Matt Cartney's Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Edinburgh, Lothian, Scotland
Posts: 1,351
Standard rims have this bead too (or at least the tube-type rims on my XT have them). I sympathise though, I just took a Bridgestone standard equipment semi-trailly off the back wheel and it took about 89 swearwords I'd use in front of my mother, 68 I'd use in front of a pretty girl and 28 I'd only use in front of a sailor with a criminal record.
__________________
http://adventure-writing.blogspot.com

http://scotlandnepal.blogspot.com/

*Disclaimer* - I am not saying my bike is better than your bike. I am not saying my way is better than your way. I am not mocking your religion/politics/other belief system. When reading my post imagine me sitting behind a frothing pint of ale, smiling and offering you a bag of peanuts. This is the sentiment in which my post is made. Please accept it as such!
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 16 May 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Cape Town / South Africa
Posts: 223
I don't know if this will help but make sure you have one long tyre lever, about 12inches is normally good enough. The second lever can be small and you use this to hold the tire to prevent it from slipping back. The long lever you use for the hard work to lever with and once the tyre is over the rim put the small right next to the big one and move the big one up about two inches and repeat the process.
To get the bead of the rim into the centre, I find using the levers is useless.
The technique I use is to place the wheel flat on the ground or floor with something to protect the rim and hub like a rag or piece of cardboard. I then use my 100+kilo body weight to step on the side of the tire and sometimes you need to rock your body weight to increase the pressure but I have always been very successful doing it in this way.
For the lightweights I guess the only advice I have is that you have to eat your porridge in the morning.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 23 May 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Cape Town / South Africa
Posts: 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsworkshop View Post
To get the bead of the rim into the centre, I find using the levers is useless.
I have to correct myself here as I try to remove a Michelin Desert using this method yesterday.
When I put all my weight on the tire the first thought is that it was still inflated. This tyre have the sidewalls of a truck tire and would not budge for nothing. I fetched my tire levers each about 18 inches long and it was incredible how easy it was when you have some leverage.
I think the biggest problem with changing tires is the size of the tire lever. So as they say size does count and I can clearly remember taking of a tire using the BMW provided 6 inch lever and eventually having to give up with badly bruised hands from applying as much pressure as I could.
Long levers will make all the difference and the longer the better, only problem is where to stow the buggers as they can get long and heavy.
You will get away using a combination of long and short together so you can save on weight but for the long I would recommend carrying one as long as what can fit in your pannier box.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 23 May 2007
*Touring Ted*'s Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Wirral, England.
Posts: 4,420
The biggest factor I find when trying to break the bead on a tyre is size of the lip/curve/point etc the end of the lever.

You have to get that initial movement which is almost impossible with large levers. Very thin narrow levers are good for this. I carry one for this very task and bigger ones for actual removal.

I have even bent the end of a flat blade screwdriver and eased it under the bead with lots of lube before. That almost always works.
__________________
www.TouringTed.com
1994 XR650L
2001 NX650 Dominator.

BMW Dealer Technician
Welder/Fabricator

Ushuaia - Colombia 2007/8
UK- South Africa 2010/11
India 2012
Yukon 2012
S.E Asia 2014
U.K - Magadan 2015
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 24 May 2007
bikerfromsark's Avatar
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 201
Hi
Thanks for all your replys. I think I will get hold a longer leaver and also a small thiner one too. So am I mistaken about rims with out this raised lip, in Chris Scotts book he calls this 'locating lip' on safety rims, are rims avaliable with out this extra lip? Beacuse it does make getting the tyre into the center harder
Cheers again George
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 24 May 2007
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: watford england
Posts: 174
H.U. Meeting

George, I will be at the meeting with either my TTR or TTRE, I can chat with you about TTR related issues. I have only ever needed to use 200mm levers, but I know I wouldn't be able to with a desert!
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Problems with the new Behr Rims Giles4060 KTM Tech 1 27 Aug 2006 09:42
Tubed tyres on tubeless rims? parkie Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else 5 4 Mar 2004 23:31
Tubeless Tyres and Autoboxes. tony johnston 4WD Overland Tech 1 3 Jan 2004 15:21
rims - steel vs magnesium vs other cabron Yamaha Tech 0 16 Apr 2002 19:41
Tubed tyres on tubeless rims Andy Booth Equipment Reviews 6 19 Mar 2002 01:36

 
 


HU DVD Summer Special!

Now that summer is here, get On the Road! Take 30% off the Achievable Dream - On the Road! 2-DVD set until August 31 only. Get On the Road! Learn the tips to staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure!

Our veteran travellers share their tips (and great stories) for staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure.

"A fantastic, informative and inspirational DVD."

"It's brilliant - thank you very much!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'ONTHEROAD' on your order when you checkout.


Renedian Adventures


Renedian Adventures

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:29.