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-   -   Can you swap a XT600E 1992 carb for a 2003 (http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hubb/yamaha-tech/can-you-swap-xt600e-1992-a-32608)

jrm 25 Jan 2008 10:21

Can you swap a XT600E 1992 carb for a 2003
 
Hello,

Will the carb from a XT600E 2003 work on a XT600E 1992?

Cheers
JRM

aukeboss 25 Jan 2008 10:56

Yes
 
It will work.
Check that the connecting rubbers airbox - carb and carb - cil head are the same. If not, you'll have to do some 'engineering'.

But the bike wil certainly run with it.

Auke

cyberzar 25 Jan 2008 13:43

Carb
 
One more thing, there can be small differencies due to antipollution laws, in general a newer (more recent) carb could reduce your power... just in case, you should check and replace (if different) a few parts.

Basically the two fuel JET, the two needles, and the min rpm jet.

Martynbiker 25 Jan 2008 15:50

due to less wear?
 
may one ask WHY you are replacing the carb? is it for more power/economy/ or just cos the old one is not running right?

Personally ~ I would rebuild old carb with new jets/needles/needle valves and diaframs ( spelling?) unless you can get a newer model carb cheap.
check the diafram on the carbs before you discard them as quite often that causes a lot of headaches.

email me if you have problems, i will see what i can do!

zardonikus@gmail.com

Malc

zap2504 25 Jan 2008 19:52

One thing that has been mentioned here on the HUBB (and I am looking for myself) is that the dual-carb setup from the Yamaha Raptor 660 will fit the XT600E intake manifolds (but you need to construct a different carb-to-aircleaner box setup). Advantage is that the Raptor carbs are identical CV carbs that both open at the same time, unlike the OEM XT600E primary/secondary carbs. Just a thought... It really depends what "problem" you are trying to fix.

tomwest 26 Jan 2008 04:39

Fuel economy with Raptor carbs?
 
Does anyone know what milage you get with the Raptor carbs? I have heard that they give some improvement in midrange.But I have no idea if this is true?

Martynbiker 26 Jan 2008 14:12

so does...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by tomwest (Post 170985)
Does anyone know what milage you get with the Raptor carbs? I have heard that they give some improvement in midrange.But I have no idea if this is true?

try dropping a tooth on front sprocket instead it much cheaper:thumbup1:

tomwest 28 Jan 2008 06:49

yea but...
 
how fun is simple and cheap? :cool4:

bruken 31 Jan 2008 10:23

Quote:

Originally Posted by tomwest (Post 170985)
Does anyone know what milage you get with the Raptor carbs? I have heard that they give some improvement in midrange.But I have no idea if this is true?

from here: CVK40



CV or SLIDE CARB - The Great Compromise

Both the CV and conventional slide carbs are classified as variable venturi carbs. The slide on a conventional carb is directly connected to the throttle cable. Twist the throttle grip and the slide is raised in the venturi. On a CV carb the throttle cable is connected to a butterfly valve that varies the volume through the venturi. It's not the throttle, it's the pressure difference from the venturi to the outside atmosphere that moves the slide.

So which type is better? That depends on what you want to do. The manufacturers will tell you the CV is the next best thing to electronic fuel injection. It does feed a precise amount of mixture to smooth out throttle response, reduce pollution, and stretch your fuel budget and gas tank range.

This is great for tarmac cruising and feeling warm and fuzzy about doing your part to reduce global warming while pocketing some spare change. It sure makes it easier for the manufacturers to get the EPA approval stamp on the bike.

But what if you feel that no matter how much you hop up your little beast, you're never going to match the belching of that cager in the gas guzzling V-12 ? What if you don't mind spending more for gas, and when you go off-road you want a burst of power to blip over obstacles or steer through a wash without fanning your clutch while waiting for the vacuum to build in the venturi? If you can discipline yourself to control the throttle so that you don't bog your engine, then you want a conventional slide carb.

Martynbiker 31 Jan 2008 10:33

i do agree with most of what you said but.....
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by bruken

if you can discipline yourself to control the throttle so that you don't bog your engine, then you want a conventional slide carb.

So what did we do before CV carbs then?? :eek3:

Martyn

bruken 31 Jan 2008 14:20

are you for real?

CD Slide.

have a look here if it floats your boat

Amal (motorcycle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)


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